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Discussion Starter #1
My Redhawk is having light strikes just often enough to be a pain. I've ordered the Bowen lengthened pin and extra weight springs just in case. Has anyone else experienced light strikes in double action and went this route?
Thanks!
Jason
 

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It is a not-uncommon occurrence in the Reds.
On my Red & my Super red, and three Blackhawks, I didn't wait for it to become a problem & just had the Bowen pins installed early on.

None of those are range toys, all MUST function reliably with any primer made.
For me, worth every penny.
Denis
 

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Here is an article, if you have not come across it, on Bowen's website:

+ Bowen Classic Arms + News

Scroll down to Dec. 11, 2011. He brings up the thought about the transfer bar on later Redhawks. Some years back I had a Redhawk that had been tuned and had a number of FTF's in double action (due to reduced weight springs). I installed the reduced power 14 pound spring, had a Bowen extended firing pin installed with firing pin protrusion at 0.055" and the head space measured 0.063". The gun then fired reliably in double action WW, Remington, Federal primers. Never tried CCI.

I would try first the extended firing pin and reducing if it is not already the headspace to near the minimum and check endshake to see that it is acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the link! I had read that but need to read it again, as a lot of info is presented. The transfer bar cover just over half of the pin. It seems , to the eyeball measuring device employed, to cover the same surface area as the T.B. on my old model Birdshead vaquero. I am hoping that the extended pin will cure the ills, and I won't need to use the 30 lbs heavy spring. The trigger, in DA, on this redhawk is as nice as my GP 100 and just as nice and smooth as the trigger on my traded away 625. I'd hate to stiffen it up.
Here to fore, all the light strikes have cost me is time on an IPSC stage and a bit of frustration, but this revolvers intended purpose is as a Perfect Packin' Pistol, any time, anywhere on Earth....
Not til it goes bang every time!
No light strikes here... but the reloads were sticky... had it lightly chamfered and they smoothed up... I did have light strikes before the chamfering so that's not the cause.

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=889111301113885&l=9163335872026415310
Jason
 

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From Iowegen's posts: "The fix is quite simple .... just grind about .020" from the top step of the hammer. This will place more energy on the firing pin and less on the frame. Make sure your hammer fits "square" in the frame slot. Sometimes Ruger leaves a bit of metal in the corners, which limits hammer contact with the transfer bar. In other words, the top step face of the hammer should fit flush with the frame. I usually round the side edges of the hammer's top step just a little to make sure the corners clear."
 

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There is also another method that Sarge in his article on the "Repatriated GP100" mentioned. It involves filing the frame of the gun where the recoil shield is on the hammer side IF there is additional travel for the firing pin available. Bowen, in his out of print book, mentioned that there were limits to working only with hammer to increase firing pin protrusion. I guess selection of method is a function of how much the firing pin protrusion would need to be increased.
 

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ArisinWind, Thanks for quoting my previous post. Ruger uses the same exact design in all their SA and DA revolvers and many people don't understand how a transfer bar hammer system works. Here's how it works: The bottom step of the hammer is what strikes the transfer bar and in turn strikes the firing pin. The hammer has plenty of kinetic energy to detonate primers and there is plenty of firing pin protrusion, however much of that energy is dissipated when the top step of the hammer strikes the frame, leaving less energy available when the lower step strikes the transfer bar. Simple mechanics ... if you remove about .020" from the top step, less energy will be dissipated on the frame and more energy will be applied to the transfer bar and firing pin, thus ending weak primer hits.

Replacing the firing pin with a longer one does NOT increase the energy applied to the firing pin ... it merely drives the firing pin a bit farther. In most cases, this is enough to get deeper dents in primers and will usually detonate most primers. Replacing firing pins is NOT an easy task and usually ends up with cosmetic damage to the frame. You have to drive the skinny cross pin out of the frame in order to remove the firing pin bushing (AKA recoil plate), which often results in damage to the frame. After replacing the firing pin, getting the recoil plate lined up so the cross pin will align is quite a challenge. In all, it's just not worth the cost of a new firing pin and the potential damage to the frame when there is a much cheaper and simpler solution.

As noted in the quote of ArisinWind's post, it is very common to see a hammer channel where the corners are not squared. With the hammer spring removed, push the hammer fully forward and see if there is a gap between the hammer's top step and the frame. If so, you can either file the corners of the frame or grind a slight taper on both outer edges of the hammer. Just a caution ... hammers are easily replaced ... frames are not, so it's always wiser to take metal off the hammer. By eliminating the gap between the hammer's top step and the frame, the hammer will actually travel a few thousands farther, which puts more energy on the transfer bar and firing pin and less on the frame. In many cases, this is enough to get positive primers hits.

If you use a reduced power spring, chances are you will have to take a little metal off the face of the hammer's top step. This is quite easy ... measure the top step using the hammer spur as a reference point. Start by removing just .010" from the face of the top step. Note: as the hammer moves forward in an arc, the angle of the top step changes slightly so you need to compensate for that change. Here's a photo below showing how I do hammers. First, I drill a hole in a board the same size as the hammer pivot pin and use the drill bit as a pivot pin. By adjusting the position of the hammer where it starts out flush with the belt sander, as you push the hammer forward, it will automatically correct for the change in angle as it removes metal. After removing about .010" (and tapering the top step edges), reassemble the revolver and try operating the gun. I recommend using the DA mode because the hammer isn't back quite as far as when in the SA mode. Further, use the hardest primers you can find ... which would be a magnum primer ... CCIs tend to be the hardest to detonate. If the gun works OK ... you're done .. if you still get light strikes, you can remove as much as .020" total from the top step. If you remove too much, the trigger won't reset but that's not the end of the world ... just remove a few thousandths from the rear surface of the transfer bar to compensate. I've been using this technique on all Ruger DA revolvers for at least 20 years and never found a instance where it didn't work perfect.

Here a photo of a GP100 hammer ... basically the same as a Redhawk hammer. Note the difference in the top step versus the lower step (face).



Here's the setup with a belt sander:



Here's a close-up of the set-up:

 
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