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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Single Six from the 80's and the finish on the grip frame has quite a few chips in it. What is the best way to refinish it, strip and spray with Aluma-Hyde (the gun not me) or what the experts here.

Steve.......
 

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I have used AlumaHyde, and while tougher than Krylon, is nowhere near as durable as Cerakote. I am somewhat biased towards Cerakote as I am set up to blast and spray myself ( the guns, not me) so the cost is very low. If you would have to take it to someone to have it done, it would be more expensive, but would hold up better in the long run. Cerakote has a hardener mixed in when you are ready to apply,, and is then baked on. Brownell's also makes a spray can finish that is bakeable, and more durable than their air dry spray. Cerakote goes on much thinner, and can be used on moving parts, triggers, hammers, etc. with out affecting tolerances. The Cerakote itself is easy enough to apply, a small air compressor set on 25 PSI, with a moisture filter in line. I use a small touch up gun form Brownell's that cost $25.
For just doing a frame, the Brownells's bake on would be fine, just do a couple light coats instead of a heavy one so you don't get any runs. I would imagine it would adhere better if a light media blast was done to the frame before spraying. Cerakote requires a blast with 100 grit aluminum oxide for best adhesion, and of course, dipping/scrubbing with Acetone, then baking the bare part in the oven to drive out any hidden oils in the metal, and use powder free nitrile gloves to keep you fingers off the parts, then hang with a wire for spraying and putting in the oven.
 

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I'm unsure if the OP still needs help but prep for refinishing any firearm with a spray-on finish is always the same.

Have the gun media-blasted (only REAL way for it to be abrasive resistant) and clean it with some degreaser. After that, a dunk in some stronger stuff like mineral spirits, laquer thinner or the stuff ladies use to remove nail paint. Making sure to only handle the parts with gloves (the nitrile kind), put the gun in an oven or blast dry with a heat gun/wifes hair dryer before painting. After painting (only thin coats), put the gun in the oven at 300-350 for 1 hour. Once done, let the parts cool for at least that night before reassembly.

With this prep, even engine paint will work.
 

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but is there anyway to get an "egg shell" or satin look? Most Cerakote jobs look matte
 

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As MGS penned, unsure if the OP still needs help, if so here's my 2 pennies or to any other one looking for refinishing a Ruger or similar non-steel parts. Back around 2006 I redid my 1970 bought Super Single 6 that the grip frame and ejector house had dulled and lost it's original finish. I refinished the SS6 frame and ejector tube with Brownell's Aluma-Hyde II with excellent results. As in any refinish, be it wood or steel, the preprep is essential to the surface and absence of any oil on the surface. I followed directions to the 'T' and the result is still impressive after around nine years of shooting the gun. The product is 'no apply' at 9 in the AM and shoot at 4 PM. I believe I put 3-4 coats on the gun and it is necessary to let each coat cure for a specified time. I gave the can of 'Hyde' to a friend and he redid his Ruger BlkHawk with excellent results. I've used it on several other anodized metal items that still look factory new and the same as the day I refinished them. A former co-worker redid a Ruger 10-22 receiver, excellent results. There are bake-on paints available that I've heard positives about, 'sanddog' penned about the advantage of Cerakote, this is just a report of my experience of Aluma-Hyde II. I wouldn't hesitate to redo another firearm with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I still haven't gotten around to redoing my Single Six frame, lots of great advice here. I did an AR15 lower receiver with Aluma Hyde II and then cured it in an oven on very low temp and it has held up for close to 20 years so far. I have a pretty good compressor so I think I might give Cerakote a try. I have a small touch up gun and will have to see if it is compatible with the Cerakote.

Steve...........
 
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