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Discussion Starter #1
Question....

How do you get your bolt into the firing position?

Do you...

A. Have the bolt locked, by the bolt release, load a mag, release the bolt release lever and send the bolt home.

Or

B. With the bolt already in the home position, load a mag, and "slingshot" the bolt back and let in fly home.....

Let us know.... And if you wanna....why!

Gunny B
 

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YES to both, depends on the condition it's in when I pick it up.

When I first get to the range the bolt is normally closed....I then insert a magazine and pull the charging handle back and let go. After the first magazine is fired at the range it's usually left with the bolt back so I just insert another mag and hit the bolt release.
 

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Unless you want to be replacing the bolt catch in very short order, do not use the bolt catch lever to release the bolt. Even the owners manual states not to close the bolt this way. Always slingshot the pistol to close the bolt.



Pull back on the bolt and release it - like a slingshot or shooting an arrow, which is why this method is called the "slingshot method". The bolt catch is much softer than the bolt and will wear out very quickly if you close the bolt by depressing the catch lever. If you do not use this method, it will not take very long to have your bolt fail to lock back on the last round, and the normally squared off face of the bolt stop will be rounded. Like this one-




Or worse, the bottom left edge of the bolt itself can get rounded and cause the same symptom.





Your choice, but using the bolt catch lever like one on a 1911 will eventually cause premature wear and a failure to lock back the bolt.

R,
Bullseye
 

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What Bullseye said!

I've found that all semi-auto pistols are "happier" if you pull back the slide (or bolt, in the case of pistols like the Mark I/II/III) and release it, rather than using the bolt/slide lock lever. I've even found that to be true with my M1 Garand, M1A, etc.

Jim
 

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Not to mention, by slingshotting the bolt you're basically operating the action as it would normally be functioning during the normal recoil process, that is the full recoil spring is closing the bolt on the 1st round out of the magazine.

R,
Bullseye
 

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Extra bonus points to anyone who can look at those two pictures of bolts and spot something else wrong with the damaged one.

R,
Bullseye
 

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Extra bonus points to anyone who can look at those two pictures of bolts and spot something else wrong with the damaged one.

R,
Bullseye
Maybe it's just the lighting, but it looks like the extractor is worn on the bottom.

Jim
 

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That's not the issue with this one, extractors are normally rounded on a little the bottom edge to facilitate the cartridge seating underneath the extractor claw after being drawn up out of the magazine's feed lips. If you look closer at the top one you can see it is slightly rounded too.

R,
Bullseye
 

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My goal has always been to educate not denigrate.

R,
Bullseye
Question: With a stock 22/45 you have to hold the bolt release down and then "slingshot" the bolt but if you perform the "slingshot mod", it will work the same as a MK III Target model. Is this correct?
I just got my 22/45 model 10143 today and will be doing the VQ trigger job and mag release mod. It looks like a minor job to do the "slingshot" thing while in there.
 

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That is correct! You must take the detent ball out of the bolt stop in a 22/45 model pistol to allow for slingshotting the bolt without having to manually depress the bolt release button.

2245 Maintenance Page

R,
Bullseye
 

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That is correct! You must take the detent ball out of the bolt stop in a 22/45 model pistol to allow for slingshotting the bolt without having to manually depress the bolt release button.

2245 Maintenance Page

R,
Bullseye
THANK YOU Bullseye!!! This is excellent data provided in the link you posted...just saved it as a 'favorite'.

Can't thank you enough!! :)

I guess all these years shooting 1911s has made me a bit presumptuous, and taking things for granted. :eek:
 

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Extra bonus points to anyone who can look at those two pictures of bolts and spot something else wrong with the damaged one.
Not seeing very many folks taking up the challenge I threw out last night; only had one brave soul.

Here's another clue- The problem is the most likely cause to create this situation.



Who's next?

R,
Bullseye
 

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There's a winner!

The extractor claw is sitting high out from the breech face which causes and inconsistent ejection of the spent cartridges. This can be from wear or an incorrect fit on the extractor itself.

To test for proper claw tension and hold, remove the bolt, place a live round on the claw and shake the bolt back and forth. If the round stays secure underneath the claw you have the proper tension from the extractor plunger and the claw is positioned properly to retain the casing. Otherwise the claw will allow the spent casing to sag, or depart the breech face prematurely, and fail to strike the ejector pin with enough force to sufficiently clear the ejection port. This ejection timing problem will cause a "stovepipe" jam like the one pictured in the clue.

Notice the successive round has a "bent nose" jam because the spent casing has not cleared the breech face and allowed the new round to insert underneath the claw. If the bottom edge of the extractor claw is not properly "broken" slightly it can catch on the brass of the casing and cause another timing issue which would also create a "Bent nose" jam. (Breaking the bottom edge is just slightly honing the bottom sharp edge/corner enough to allow for the case to smoothly transition underneath the hook.)

R,
Bullseye
 

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That is correct! You must take the detent ball out of the bolt stop in a 22/45 model pistol to allow for slingshotting the bolt without having to manually depress the bolt release button.

2245 Maintenance Page

R,
Bullseye
I did that to my 10143 Talo, but it still hung up a little. I had to file and use a dremel on the piece of the bolt stop that slides into the frame so it would drop freely with the gravity.
 

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Extractor not engaging enough...worn
I also replaced the extractor with one from Volquartsen, it wouldn't work properly. I called Volquartsen and was told they need to be modified for the Mark III 22/45. They sent one out that was modified and now works great.
I was also told that they will soon be making them modified in the next run.
Also if someone has one and it is not extracting properly all one has to do is file the tip just a wee bit and it is now modified.
 
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