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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone explain the difference between large pistol, large magnum pistol, and CCI 350 primers? The book I have calls for large pistol primers, I've read bad things about using magnum primers in reloading a 44 magnum. But have read good things about using CCI 350 primers, but those seem to be labeled as large magnum pistol primers....
 

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Can anyone explain the difference between large pistol, large magnum pistol, and CCI 350 primers? The book I have calls for large pistol primers, I've read bad things about using magnum primers in reloading a 44 magnum. But have read good things about using CCI 350 primers, but those seem to be labeled as large magnum pistol primers....
I was taught by the old timers to use magnum primers with ball powders, like h110, w296 etc. I do this for the 357, 44, 454 casull, and 50 ae. I only use cci primers in my reloads. Reason being that ball powders were harder to produce a complete burn because of composition. The magnum primer was needed to get a more uniform burn, and less velocity loss, or unburnt powder ( burning rich) What powder are you using, bullet info?

With stick powders in rifle I use regular primers, ball I use magnum primers. So I have the same procedures for most rounds, determined by loading, and composition. Only discrepancy is with 30 carbine I use h110 with a small rifle primer, ditto with 300 blackout.
 

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Certain powders benefit from magnum primers, some operate fine with standard primers. Ball powders, magnum powders, need a little extra heat.

Get a few manuals, you'll be able to see how different powders are combined with magnum or standard primers. Compare the bullet weights and charge weights, you'll quickly see how different powders and primers fit together. It's not rocket science - just pay attention to what your cases are telling you.
 

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In the modern handloading manuals (Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Nosler, Hodgdon...), the load 'recipes' will specify standard or magnum primers. The manual publishers use modern test equipment and procedures to determine that chamber pressures are within SAAMI specs. Trust their data...
 

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If the book calls for large pistol primers, then use standard CCI-300, WLP pistol primers. I don't use Federal, so don't know what they call theirs. If it calls for a magnum primer, then CCI-350 is called for or equivalent. My goto primers are CCI. I rarely use anything else unless there is a shortage. Then I use anything I can get my hands on! :)

As said above, you normally use magnum primers with powders that need it ... Like H110/296. Some other powders don't need it, but they prefer it. For example 4227 and HS-6 seem to get better results over the chronograph. So I'll use the magnum primer in those cases (pun intended). Anyway, hope that helps a little bit.

As for the difference in the primers themselves, I believe there is a technical write-up on primers somewhere on this forum. Rule of thumb is Magnum primers will raise the pressure higher than standard primers, so if working at the bleeding edge, you need to be careful if going from standard to magnum... Rework up the load is the standard procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Using H110 and Federal Larger pistol primers.

thats what the reloading manual calls for,

winchester large pistol primers, but all I could find was federal.

the magnum primers are cheaper, that the large pistol primers where I got them.
 

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regardless of powder, in Nosler's latest manual for both rifle and pistol loads they call for Large Pistol primers .... specifically WLP
 

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WLP's and Rem 2 1/2's are both cited to be "almost magnum" primers - a little hotter than standards, but not necessarily the same level of marked magnum primers. That distinction is largely without a difference - they work fine with magnum powders.

I'm at the office today and I don't have copies of all of my books here at my desk, but I have some:

Swift #2 uses Rem 2 1/2's for all powders
Nosler #7 uses WLP's for all powders
Speer #13 uses CCI 300 & 350's, matching magnums with specific magnum powders powders
Hornady #9 uses WLP's for all powders
Lyman #49 uses CCI 300 & 350's, matching magnums with specific magnum powders

BUT... when you cross reference the bullet weights and powder charge weights, you can see that WLP's and Rem 2 1/2's are specified for magnum powders with similar charge weights compared to the CCI 350 (or Fed 155) loads. Whether they're equivalent for flame or not, it's largely irrelevant - they work, so "good enough is good enough".
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Question:

For the Ruger 44 Redhawk Magnum does the cartridge headspace on the case mouth.

the reason I'm asking is I want to roll crimp using the seating die, but would rather have a dedicated die to do the crimping, because I have to reset the die everytime to crimp.

and the die I'm looking at says not to use if the cartridge headspaces on the case mouth and I dont understand that terminology.
 

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44 Magnum is a rimmed cartridge, therefore it head spaces off the rim (not the mouth). Go ahead and roll crimp until your hearts content.
 

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RugerAR, most revolver calibers, such as your 44 mag, headspaces from the rim and you can roll crimp the case mouth. Most pistol calibers for semi auto pistols, such as 45acp and 9mm, headspace on the case mouth and you should only taper crimp enough to allow the cartridge to fully chamber. If you roll crimp a case that will be used in a semi auto, you may end up with a cartridge that will chamber too deep and cause a misfire.
 

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I was taught by the old timers to use magnum primers with ball powders, like h110, w296 etc. I do this for the 357, 44, 454 casull, and 50 ae. I only use cci primers in my reloads. Reason being that ball powders were harder to produce a complete burn because of composition. The magnum primer was needed to get a more uniform burn, and less velocity loss, or unburnt powder ( burning rich) What powder are you using, bullet info?

With stick powders in rifle I use regular primers, ball I use magnum primers. So I have the same procedures for most rounds, determined by loading, and composition. Only discrepancy is with 30 carbine I use h110 with a small rifle primer, ditto with 300 blackout.
This is exactly what I do and have been teaching others to do for forty+ years! It has always worked well. The only exceptions would be for really large capacity cartridges and not always then.
 

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Ground your press or your powder dispenser and you'll keep your powders from sticking. I ran a bit of copper grounding wire from my press and from my powder column down to the ground point in a plug on my reloading bench power strip, which of course, grounds to my house (confirmed ground).
 

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Ground your press or your powder dispenser and you'll keep your powders from sticking. I ran a bit of copper grounding wire from my press and from my powder column down to the ground point in a plug on my reloading bench power strip, which of course, grounds to my house (confirmed ground).
Clever

Might have to try this trick. Air in the house get pretty dry this time of year on wood heat. Static electricity becomes an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Interesting point, I was reloading and my brother was over and mentioned the h110 looked magnetized, I thought it was just really fine. but the h110 clings and sticks to everything. that is a good idea. if I can just get it to funnel into the case without sticking to the scale, I think I'll have it made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
roll crimp

44 Magnum is a rimmed cartridge, therefore it head spaces off the rim (not the mouth). Go ahead and roll crimp until your hearts content.
I'm gonna get a dedicated roll crimp die then. the die that seats the bullet in my setup is also the roll crimp part, but you have to unscrew the seater etc. a lot of extra work, I think it will be much easier with a roll crimp die. too bad a roll crimp die didnt come in the kit, and was incorporated into the seater die.
 

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Absolutely nothing wrong with applying the roll crimp with the seating die as the die you own was obviously designed.

There's not a "lot of extra work" involved with raising the seater stem to roll crimp. A few turns, a couple ram strokes, and a few times in and out of a caliper - if you know your thread pitch on your seater, or know how to use a set of calipers, you can set the seater in about one minute.

Here are two fun tricks that a reloader should learn...

1) You can reset your dies quickly and easily with a set of calipers. For resizing/shoulder bump depth, use the caliper from the top of the bushing, die plate, turret, or press (depending upon your particular press design) to the top of the die body - given a consistent measurement position, you'll put the die exactly back where it was supposed to go. Equally, you can measure the height of your seating stem above the top of the die body to reset your bullet seater.

Similarly, if you know your height of your seater stem over the top of the top of the press (height of the seater over the die body + height of the die body over the press), you can change your dies quickly between no crimp and crimp without needing to incrementally test your seating depth. If the top of the seater is at the same height over the press, it'll be the same height over the shell holder, meaning it'll seat to the same COAL, regardless of where the die body is positioned.

2) Given a "dummy cartridge," you can reset your die depth and your seater depth incredibly quickly by bottoming the die against the dummy. It's really that simple.
 

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If powder is sticking to your funnels or hopper bodies, take a drier sheet and wipe them down. A used drier sheet works just fine and doesn't leave residue like a fresh one will.
 
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