Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,156 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all I have been reloading for several years! I am wanting to just reload now for the following calibers. .357/.38 special, 9mm, & .223 Remington. Currently have a old RCBS Jr. Press. I want to get a progressive press but I don't have a Dillon budget. Any thoughts about a Lee Pro 1000 or a Lee Load Master? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated in advance thanks!:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
I'm waiting to find a Loadmaster for my choice. The five hole turret is what made up my mind, but they are really close in capabilities.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I'm sure this thread will bring a ton of replies so here's my experience as a reloader of over 40 years of experience much of that with progressive machines. Remember this one trade name; DILLON.

Most likely the Lee 1000 and the Loadmaster work for many people but my experience with two 1000's and one Loadmaster were not good, and I've heard enough similar stories to think that these machines are not worth the trouble they might present.

My last Lee was a new Loadmaster and that was such a maddening P.O.S. that rather than continue calling Lee for help or seeking a refund from the dealer I simply unbolted that sucker from the bench and marched it out to the dumpster. I have NEVER thrown a tool away before or since but that one put me over the edge.

After I wised up.....Jeeeze, it only took three Lee presses.....I bought my first RL 550 and never looked back. Over the years I've purchased a second 550 and then an RL 650.

I've never seen figures to support this but I'd guess Dillon is the overwhelming choice of high volume shooters everywhere.

I have learned the hard way that if the cost of a tool doesn't make you wince it won't be good enough.
 

·
Ausmerican.
Joined
·
42,767 Posts
Another blue kool aid drinker.
RL550B doing well by me, I just wanted to do it right first time around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
I have 2 Lee Pro 1000's. One is set up for large primer, the other for small primers. They work just fine, alltho they can be a bit finicky. But if you keep them clean, lubed, and don't try and run 1000 rounds an hour, they do just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Keep your single stage.
This is my system. I use a single and with a bit of invention I crank em out pretty quickly. Get a RCBS uni flow powder measure. With the strap that comes with it you can mount it right under the die so that it attaches directly to the press. Eliminates a step and the frustration of the little teeny tiny cups.
Secondly screw a basket to the front of your bench so you can push cases or rounds over into the basket and place them into the index case later. 3 for a buck at Dollar General.
Decap, clean, flare and prime all of the brass first. Cast several hundred bullets at a time. Tumble/size them all. Then you can load when you get ready. I can load close to 200 per hour pretty easily after I get myself stocked up. If I stay on top of keeping my stock up its a relatively easy process. I ran out of lead not too long ago and dallied about getting some more. I made ingots last week and now I will have to spend an afternoon casting to replenish my stock. I do have close to a thousand 9mm cases cleaned, flared and primed. My normal stock of reloaded 9mm is six to seven hundred. Normal stock of 45 colt is 450. I am trying to get more 45 cases but they are expensive.
In my experience I dont like changing dies so I run all of what I have when I get my die set up, depending on the operation. Coffee cans are a premium item at my house.
Good luck in whatever path you choose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
I'm a huge fan of the Lee Classic Turret. Much simpler than a progressive, less parts, less adjustments, super simple caliber changes, etc, but still good speed in my opinion. I do 100-150 rounds an hour. I load 9mm,38,357,and 45 in it currently.

I have very little experience with progressives, the only one I've actually used is the Lee 1000 and was very unimpressed due to the amount of tweaking and constant stoppages to 'fix' something, but I acknowledge I didn't give it a fair trial, it was just my first impression.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
To NAAsilent: In your two Pro 1000 presses do you ever use Fed or Win primers? Ammorman
I have, tho I tend to use Tula because they are less expensive, and I've never had a FTF with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
The Lee Pro 1000 is a tweaky press to be sure. If it isn't kept clean and lubed, then all kinds of problems can crop up. Any oil in the primer feed ramp will block things up there, and powder buildup can stop you in your tracks.

The only real issue I have with mine is with the .357 cases. Theres a little catch in mine that tends to flip the cases out of the feeder instead of sliding them into the holder. Easy fix, I just single load the cases and don't use the case feeder for .357/38 Spcl.

If I had the money to blow I'd probably buy a better press, but for what I spent on mine new, they do a satisfactory job. I've never checked to see how many I can actually do in an hour, but I can make a complete round every pull of the lever, and that's about 3-5 seconds including placing the projectile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Primers

A question for the general: You seem to have a thorough knowledge of primers, so can you tell me if ther's a valid SAFETY issue with using Fed. or Win. primers in the Lee Pro 1000. They're emphatic about it but can't tell me why or what the issue is. Any information or advice that you can offer would be greatly appreciated. Thanks. Idahoman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I use a Lyman turret press. Like TXWheelgunner, I mount my RCBS powder measure under a spare die. I tend to load in batches of 200 or more. I do, however, prepare up to a thousand cases in advance, including sizing, cleaning primer pockets, tumbling, and belling the case mouths. Then when I get ready to load, I hand prime the number of cases I will be loading, and I am ready to charge with powder and seat the bullets. Since I am only currently loading for 9MM and .223, I am thinking about getting a second turret so both calibers are always ready to go.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,411 Posts
Seems every time this "what press?" topic comes up, it turns into a "brand war". Here's my take ... the initial cost of a high end press (Dillon or Hornady) is quite expensive so that may be a limiting factor for many people. If you do the math .... comparing the least expensive Lee versus the most expensive Dillon .... the cost per box is negligible when you amortize it over many years and tens of thousands of rounds. After having my Dillon for 20 years, it has paid me back many times over. No doubt, a Lee press would do the same thing but in my opinion, I would rather use a Dillon. No regrets whatsoever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
The way I see it by reloading we are taking some of the pressure off of the supply. I get a lot of satisfaction from my time at the bench. Like the old Nike ad... Just do it.
 

·
Ausmerican.
Joined
·
42,767 Posts
The way I see it by reloading we are taking some of the pressure off of the supply. I get a lot of satisfaction from my time at the bench. Like the old Nike ad... Just do it.
As do I, it's a hobby in itself..... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I am a fan of the Texaswheelgunner style, batch loading with a single stage. I decap, clean the primer pocket, tumble, resize, flare, and hand prime each case, and set aside 500 or so. I then cast, lube, and size approximately another 500 or so bullets. When I am ready to load a bunch I just have to measure powder and seat the bullet, setting them aside for crimping when I am done with them. This produces loads about as fast as my wife and I have time to shoot them, although I am thinking of at least getting a turret press eventually so I won't have to change out the flaring, bullet seating, and crimping dies, which seem to require the most adjustment. Perhaps, since I've always done things one at a time when it comes to reloading because it makes me feel safer, I am really nervous about trusting some machine to perform 5 operations at once - something is bound to go wrong eventually!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
I have used a Lyman turret, a Lee Pro 1000 (POS), and a Lee Classic turret (Not a bad press, much better than the Pro 1000)
Bit the bullet, so to speak and bought an RL550 Dillon. I now have 2 Dillon RL 550's I would not trade them for a truckload of Lee presses.
Buy once, cry once. Go Blue!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Just recently got the lee loadmaster kit. It was setup to load the .45 colt, so far I havent had any problems with it. Many people have said that the dillon will last longer and they have better customer service. Maybe one day ill get one but as for now the loadmaster serves its purpose well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
One of the things I like about going slower is catching a possible miscue before I load 50 cartridges that I then have to unload.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top