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2 Rockchuckers (1973 and 1977) and a Lee Handpress. I gave my brother in law my RCBS Jr. press a few years ago to get him started.
I had a tong style handpress I started with and used at the range to develop loads. I lost it along with my original Rock Chucker. I replaced the Rock Chucker but the hand press seemed too expensive and impractical to replace.
 

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I had a tong style handpress
I bought a Lyman 310 tool a few years ago to load .45 Colt. Only reason is to 'experience' reloading 'old style'. I prefer the single stage press of course, but still fun to load a few the 'old way' once is a great while. :) It does make you appreciate the bench top press! On the other hand, the tool is very portable.
 

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I use an old Lyman 6 stage spartan turret press . I do believe it was manufactured around the 70's but it still keeps on ticking . I have had chances for upgrades but I cling to this one for a special reason . The new Lyman 8 stage turret press caught my attention when it first came out and almost bought it but couldn't see the need of it for the simple fact that if it ain't broke why fix it theory and so I could buy bigger and better I guess but why.... but then again maybe I'm just being old school and really don't see the need in all them upgrades .. Don't get me wrong there is nothing wrong at all with progressive press and I'm all for them .. That style doesn't fit me .. So what I'm saying is Find the style that works and fits you the best and makes you comfortable reloading . Shop around . All these posts are great ideas there's not one that is bad .. Take your time with your decision because remember It's your Decision ... There are a lot of articles on here about what people use that you can research to give you a better understanding ...
 

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I'm running a Bonanza Co-Ax (pre-Forster, essentially the same press) and a Lee Hand Press. Been using them for over 35 years, and they still do everything I need them to.
 

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I use an old Lyman 6 stage spartan turret press . I do believe it was manufactured around the 70's but it still keeps on ticking . I have had chances for upgrades but I cling to this one for a special reason . The new Lyman 8 stage turret press caught my attention when it first came out and almost bought it but couldn't see the need of it for the simple fact that if it ain't broke why fix it theory and so I could buy bigger and better I guess but why.... but then again maybe I'm just being old school and really don't see the need in all them upgrades .. Don't get me wrong there is nothing wrong at all with progressive press and I'm all for them .. That style doesn't fit me .. So what I'm saying is Find the style that works and fits you the best and makes you comfortable reloading . Shop around . All these posts are great ideas there's not one that is bad .. Take your time with your decision because remember It's your Decision ... There are a lot of articles on here about what people use that you can research to give you a better understanding ...
I had the old Spar-T 6 hole, and a Spartan press before I moved to the AA-8 and Co-Ax:
Revolver Gun barrel Bicycle part Gun accessory Office ruler




Tool Hand tool Composite material Metal Bicycle part
 

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I had the old Spar-T 6 hole, and a Spartan press before I moved to the AA-8 and Co-Ax:
View attachment 186735



View attachment 186734
Coop .. It's a really great press and still In operation to this day . No problem what so ever .. I really like the looks of the new Lyman but I just can't justify it . I had an old Herter's press and I was using it for a second and only for decapping spent casings .. Friend of mine was just starting into reloading and I gave it to him on the assumption of returning it when he upgraded but that never happened ...

Wood Shotgun Sewing machine Hardwood Religious item

Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal


Aged to perfection ....
 

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I have a dillon 1050 for most of my handgun stuff. ANd a rockchucker for a decap and an rcbs t for the stuff thats doesn't get shot really often. For speed the dillons hard to beat since I shoot arond 500-600 handgun rounds a week the dillon just pounds them out faster then I can shoot them. But that said I really enjoy the rcbs just seems like your doing it all not the press.
 

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Pacific 00-7 press for metallic rifle, and Pacific DL-366 for shotshells. I have many presses, some rotate in and out of use such as a Lee basic press that I got for $1 during a store-closing that I use as a generic de-priming station. Trying to get set up for metallic pistol but haven't settled on the right press for that.
 

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I bought a Lyman 310 tool a few years ago to load .45 Colt. Only reason is to 'experience' reloading 'old style'.
Yep, I've got a half dozen calibers of 310 Tong Tool dies...loaded all of my .38/.357 lead ammunition for 4 years of college in Colorado on a tong tool, weighing each charge with a Herter's powder trickler. It's a trip back to the 1880's for sure. If you're resizing .45 Colt, you'll build up some biceps and probably crack a few knuckles.

I still use mine occasionally in '06, .243, .270 and .41 mag mostly for primer seating, when my Dillon's primer tubes are full of Winchester standards, and I want to try Magnums or Federals in testing. Too, my son's Browning M65 in .218 Bee does its best work when we've loaded the rounds with an ancient Ideal Tong Tool.

Skeeter Skelton wrote a nice piece back in the '70's about building up a back country kit for reloading...even had a melting pot and casting dies along with a tong tool...all stowed in an Army haversack. Kind of an early 'bug out' kit. It's worth doing a google search.

Best regards, Rod
 
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