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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure "sparking" isn't the correct term but that describes what I was seeing with some reloads. There were bits of burning powder coming out of the barrel with each round of 115 grain FMJs from my SR9c. There wasn't any additional noise or recoil. Is it because of the type of powder used? Improper crimp?
 

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The term you are looking for is brisance. It is normally used to describe primesrs. It means the amount and brightness of the burning primer compound or powder. If you switch to magnum primers, your problem should disappear........Robin
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I bought the reloaded ammo from a local manufacturer so have no idea what they are using for powder or primers.

Thanks for the info, I had no idea that the type of primer would influence what you see coming out the end of the barrel. Is this anything to worry about or just a characteristic of the ammo?
 

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I bought the reloaded ammo from a local manufacturer so have no idea what they are using for powder or primers.

Thanks for the info, I had no idea that the type of primer would influence what you see coming out the end of the barrel. Is this anything to worry about or just a characteristic of the ammo?
Pirate, It is not a problem, and it is safe to continue shooting, unless there signs of too much pressure. Symptons include; cases difficult to remove from the cylinder, flattened primers, evidence of blowback, around the primer, enlarged primer pocket, and the bolt face engraved on the head of the case. Good luck.....Robin
 

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What your seeing is powder that did not com-bust fully in the barrel,
(burn rate of powder is to slow for the length of the barrel ) So instead of fully burning in the barrel it is still cooking when out of the barrel. Said another way, you do not achieve the full potential of the round ( slight velocity loss ) I don't believe it will hurt anythig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just wanted to make sure and now that I know that it's a non-issue, I can say that I bought the ammo at a local gun show from Washougal River Cartridge Company. It was only $45 for a box of 250, 9mm rounds in 115 grain reloaded ammo. Decent ammo at a decent price. Their web site says that they can't sell over the internet right now so it's a local thing.
 

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Just wanted to make sure and now that I know that it's a non-issue, I can say that I bought the ammo at a local gun show from Washougal River Cartridge Company. It was only $45 for a box of 250, 9mm rounds in 115 grain reloaded ammo. Decent ammo at a decent price. Their web site says that they can't sell over the internet right now so it's a local thing.
Used to purchase .45 Colt rounds from those guys back before I started reloading. Nice guys to work with.
 

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Pirate, If you think your rounds spark a lot, during the daytime, try shooting them at night, but be prepared for the shock and awe, LOL......Robin
 

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The term you are looking for is brisance. It is normally used to describe primesrs. It means the amount and brightness of the burning primer compound or powder. If you switch to magnum primers, your problem should disappear........Robin

"Brisance" never heard of that work before I guess you can teach and old dog something new. I will now be able to empress my reloading friends with my new knowledge.
 

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The term you are looking for is brisance ... It means the amount and brightness of the burning primer compound or powder.
This is rainy Sunday quibbling. Neither a challenge nor a criticism, just naked boredom.


@ wikipedia:

"Brisance is the shattering capability of an explosive. It is a measure of the rapidity with which an explosive develops its maximum pressure. The term originates from the French verb "briser", which means to break or shatter. Brisance is of practical importance for determining the effectiveness of an explosion in fragmenting shells, bomb casings, grenades, structures, and the like.

Low brisance is required when a mechanism is intended to survive an explosion, such as the firing of a gun or cannon.

A brisant explosive is one that attains its maximum pressure so rapidly that a shock wave is formed. The net effect is to shatter (by shock resonance) the material surrounding or in contact with the supersonic detonation wave created by the explosion. Even within high explosives which build up a supersonic shock front, some build up faster than others, yield higher detonation velocities, and tend more towards controlled shock fronts in bulk, all of which lead to higher brisance.

Thus, brisance is a measure of the overall shattering ability of an explosive and is not necessarily correlated with the explosive's total work capacity. It cannot be predicted with full certainty as of now, but has to be quantified empirically."
 
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