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Discussion Starter #1
I have a mid 1980's Remington Model Seven with the older style trigger (safety doesn't lock the bolt style). I've read the stories of the Model 700 trigger (which mine has) firing when clicking off the safety. Mine has never done this in checking its function, and I keep the action/trigger unit very clean. The trigger functions and feels quite well for shooting. My questions are: should I keep the stock trigger and maintain it; send it in to Rem for 'service'; or replace it with something like a Timney? All comments and opinions are appreciated.
 

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The latest recall only affects the XMP trigger, which was used only since - If I remember correctly - 2006. The previous problems the the Remington 700 trigger had to do with the redesigned trigger (from the 1970's, I think, but I don't have the information at hand) being very sensitive to dimensional variations, such as normal manufacturing tolerances and wear. Some of the triggers, those with part that were at the edges of manufacturing tolerance, would wear enough to release the striker when the safety was released.

I have a Remington 700 from the 1980's and it doesn't have this problem. Still, every time I take it out shooting or hunting, I check (with the rifle unloaded) that releasing the safety doesn't release the striker.


Jim
 

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If you are concerned that your trigger maybe recalled you need to call Remington. Have the serial number for your rifle ready when you call Remington. The way the recall notice is written for rifles that were sold 30 or 40 years ago is not very effective. Unless you just want an aftermarket trigger I would let Remington fix the trigger at their expense.
 

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prior to making a decision, it would seem wise to make sure if your Remington has a problem .... contacting Remington directly would seem to be the cheapest and probably most efficient way of doing so .... if you find it doesn't, you can shoot is as is or modify it .... if it does have a potential problem, you can have them fix it or go with an aftermarket alternative
 

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If you are concerned that your trigger maybe recalled you need to call Remington. Have the serial number for your rifle ready when you call Remington. The way the recall notice is written for rifles that were sold 30 or 40 years ago is not very effective. Unless you just want an aftermarket trigger I would let Remington fix the trigger at their expense.
I wouldn't let Remington touch my older 700 rifle with a Walker trigger. You will most assuredly get a "lawyered up" late model trigger.

If the older triggers DO happen to fire when switched from safe.........they simply need adjusted for more sear engagement, not replaced
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I wouldn't let Remington touch my older 700 rifle with a Walker trigger. You will most assuredly get a "lawyered up" late model trigger.

If the older triggers DO happen to fire when switched from safe.........they simply need adjusted for more sear engagement, not replaced
Thanks for the info. My rifle's trigger is the 'Walker' style, and it has not been touched (from factory setting) since purchase. I know that Remington doesn't have a formal 'recall' on this trigger style. The info I have found says that the main problem lies in the trigger connector part, and when it gets affected by rust or debris build-up.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just as a follow-up...

A few weeks ago, I purchased a Rifle Basix L-1 trigger for my Model 7. I'll be installing it next month and trying it out on the range. I was 'pretty sure' that I would not have an issue with the stock Walker-style trigger, but I wanted more confidence than that. The RB trigger appears to be very well made and have good adjustibility. The customer support from RB (if needed) is supposed to be excellent, too.
 

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My first rifle was a Model 700 and you had to take off safe to unload. Remington recalled and I took to an approved Gunsmith and he did the work to be able to unload on safe. He adjusted the weight to 3# and it works just fine for me.
 

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In the 1970s I had a Remington 700 BDL in 270. I didn't realise I had a problem with my trigger until I was hunting one day. Returning from the hunt I was at the assemble area with several other hunters. I had the safety engaged. I pointed the rifle in a safe direction and released the safety and the rifle discharged. I removed all the rounds and cases the rifle. The next work day I called Remington and explained my problem. They didn't offer any assistance. After several attempts to get help to no avail, I sold the gun and never owned another Remington. I hope Remington's CS has improved.
 

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If you are not entirely familiar with it seek help from a well qualified professional - gun smith.

My opinion on the subject is that these malfunctions of discharge upon releasing the safety are caused by stupid amateur tinkering with the trigger or profound long term neglect.

An example of this would be reducing or an attempt to reduce the trigger pull to next to zippo combined with or not combined with reducing the sear/trigger engagement. Introduce filth and rust and congealed oil into the mix and failure is almost certain. On occasion, self taught and ignorant police armorers have screwed up Rem triggers.

A really undesirable feature of that trigger is the requirement to release the safety before the rifle can be unlocked and unloaded. Several years ago, when in the local Home Depot parking lot, a Rem 700 .22-.250 when off several cars down when the owner released the safety to unlock and unload the rifle.

Upon inspection and being aware of your concerns and suggestions that the safety bolt lockup is sort of scary the well qualified, knowledgeable, skilled, and experienced gun smith might effect a modification shown in the pic below. This shows the part of the safety that blocks the bolt from being rotated has been removed. Granted this is not exactly a smooth cut off but effectively removes the offending part.

Any doubts get it checked out.

The trigger pull/spring should be strong enough to position the trigger under the sear every time. The trigger/sear engagement is shown in the round window located on the bottom of the pic. Accumulated filth and greatly reduced trigger pull equate to problems.

Keep everything real clean and don't go for a trigger pull less than 3 pounds.

The Rem 700 and its military variations have worked well under all sorts of bad conditions but need maintenance to keep running.
 

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I really doubt Remington would have issued a recall because of a few guys tinkering with their rifles. My Model 700 was made in the early 1970's and recalled. The recall consisted of taking the rifle to a Remington approved gunsmith. In my case that was an hour and a half drive away. I took it to him and he had the rifle for a week.

Making blanket statements about other owners adds nothing to the narrative.
 

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A Walker trigger, is a Walker trigger. If it fires when you drop the safety, the sear engagement is too little. That too little can be caused by dirt or misadjustment. That's as simple as it gets. Because the Smith had the rifle a week, doesn't mean it was a difficult fix. In all my years of owning hundreds of Remington rifles........I have seen TWO with this problem. I had one and my uncle had one. Clean and readjust the triggers, problem solved. Recalls are issued because there COULD be a problem, not always because there IS a problem. And I will repeat, NO WAY I would send in a Remington rifle, with a well made Walker trigger on it, to get some heavy, lawyered up junk trigger put on it. Don't trust yourself to fix it, find a qualified Smith. Probably cost you 50 bucks if that much.

Back when you could get REAL rifles, with nice adjustable triggers, people tended to tinker with them. The Holy Grail for many older people was the 70 Winchester. Guess what, adjust it too light, it will slam fire and all kinds of interesting things. Don't recall Winchester issuing a recall and Model 70s considered junk by many. Remington CHOSE to offer to replace the triggers, they were not forced
 

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Check you rifle according to the recall & serial # every Remington 700 that I have had never had any trigger issues but thats just my experience with them!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
...My opinion on the subject is that these malfunctions of discharge upon releasing the safety are caused by stupid amateur tinkering with the trigger or profound long term neglect.

An example of this would be reducing or an attempt to reduce the trigger pull to next to zippo combined with or not combined with reducing the sear/trigger engagement. Introduce filth and rust and congealed oil into the mix and failure is almost certain. On occasion, self taught and ignorant police armorers have screwed up Rem triggers.

A really undesirable feature of that trigger is the requirement to release the safety before the rifle can be unlocked and unloaded... ...The trigger pull/spring should be strong enough to position the trigger under the sear every time. The trigger/sear engagement is shown in the round window located on the bottom of the pic. Accumulated filth and greatly reduced trigger pull equate to problems.

Keep everything real clean and don't go for a trigger pull less than 3 pounds.

The Rem 700 and its military variations have worked well under all sorts of bad conditions but need maintenance to keep running.
As I indicated earlier, my Walker-style trigger is the type that allows bolt manipulation with the safety on. I have never had any issues with my particular trigger. But after researching about the function of the trigger connector on the Walker-style trigger, and Mr Walker himself later acknowledging that the floating connector could be deleted from the mechanism, I decided that I wanted a 'connectorless' trigger, and not an X-Mark Pro trigger, either.
If I was out on a hunting trip, and I was unable to detail strip and meticulously clean the action after it was exposed to a particularly dirty event, I wanted a trigger that was as simple and rugged as possible, and easy to clean out with a lighter fluid flush and some canned air. I believe the Rifle Basix and Timney triggers for the Remington action are those types of triggers. I went with the RB over the Timney mainly due to the wide, grooved trigger on the RB.
 

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Like every other man made mechanism the Rem 700 trigger is subject to failure and requires a moderate amount of common sense and skill to keep it working.

If you are not thoroughly familiar with how it works don't attack it with a screw driver.

Remington apparently has some "certified" gun smiths out there, like:

Support - Repair Services - Shotgun Repair - Centerfire Repair - Rimfire Repair

As far as getting your rifle (a firearm) to them UPS tells me that they must have a copy of the destination FFL.

Personally, not being satisfied with blanket assurances that things are fixed or just fine I would want to know where the gunsmith was trained and exactly what was performed or was planned to be performed. An explanation like "cleaned and adjusted trigger" would be inadequate. I would want to know at what weight the trigger pull was adjusted to and if any other adjustments were performed. I would, before shipment, provide the s/n of the rifle and other info like how long I had it.

I am unaware of any specific defects of the older Walker triggers except for the possibility of the "floating connector" (between trigger and sear - apparently a hardened steel part positioned against the trigger intended to engage the sear) might screw up trigger/sear engagement if the trigger is adjusted for absolutely minimal creep - an undesirable feature in a rifle used under field conditions and the same problem would remain under the same circumstances without the "floating connector". But have seen some real screwed up results of amateur attempts to improve trigger function.

I have some familiarity with the older M700's and SA M40's but am ignorant of the newer LA M24, also a Rem 700.

Should you be in some alien place far removed from a certified repair facility or UPS center/shipping point (some UPS stores refuse to ship guns) your recourse would be to take it out of the stock, clean it, then check things out. Should you acquire the rifle from another this is compulsory.

Sending the rifle to a certified repair facility each year is another option. As mentioned a RB or Timney trigger could be fitted to replace the Remington trigger. The Remington factory trigger on my rifle has worked well since 1995 but I cleaned lots of filth and junk out of it.
 

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This is the recall notice I got and had done on my rifle.

If you own a Remington Model 700 or Model 40-X rifle:
Only those Model 700 or 40-X rifles made before March 1982 were manufactured with a bolt-lock mechanism. Model 700 or 40-X rifles made after March 1982 do not have a bolt-lock mechanism and may be loaded and unloaded with the safety in the “S” or “On Safe” position. Consequently, post-1982 Model 700 or 40-X rifles are not subject to this bolt-lock Safety Modification Program.
To determine whether your Model 700 or 40-X rifle has a bolt-lock mechanism, either:

  • Call Remington toll-free at 1-800-243-9700 and a service representative will help you determine if your firearm has a bolt-lock mechanism, or
  • If your Model 700 or 40-X rifle has a bolt-lock mechanism, it is eligible for this bolt-lock Safety Modification Program. If you participate, your firearm will be cleaned and inspected for proper functioning by a qualified gunsmith. Once the condition of your firearm has been assessed, you will be notified of one of the following:
  • Your firearm’s trigger assembly is otherwise in good operating condition, and the gunsmith will proceed to physically remove the bolt-lock feature so that your rifle can be loaded and unloaded while the safety remains in the “S” or “On Safe” position; or
  • Your rifle’s trigger assembly is found to be in an unsatisfactory or potentially unsafe operating condition because of any number of factors, including wear, alteration or maintenance. The entire trigger assembly will be replaced with a new factory trigger assembly, which does not incorporate a bolt-lock mechanism.
I suspect this is the one the OP is worried about:

http://www.remington.com/pages/news-and-resources/safety-center/safety-warning-recall-notice-remington-model700-modelseven.aspx
 

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My 700 SPS was in the last recall. When I checked on it in July, I was told there was a minimum 12 week backlog, as they were in the process of moving. They did not want it sent to a certified gun smith. They wanted it at the factory. With deer season very close to that turn around time, I went with a Timney drop in replacement. I know the Remington option would have been without cost, but I didn't want to have to come up to hunting season and not have a gun back. The trigger is in my safe now. Remington won't take just the trigger assembly and repair it.
 
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