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I have a 454 SRH which also shoots 45LC. There is a lead ring that builds up on the inside of the cylinder from shooting 45LC cast bullets. I've been reading some suggestions about the best way to remove the lead-ring buildup.

Some people have recommended Shooters Choice Lead Remover while others swear by Bore Tech Eliminator. What are suggestions for removing those lead rings?
 

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Are you sure it is lead? When shooting cast bullet 38 specials in a 357 The rings I get are lube and carbon. I don't remember ever getting lead in there. The crud is hard to get loose and takes some serious brushing and solvents.
 

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If a regular bore brush won't get rid of it, I'd suggest the Lewis Lead Remover (available at Brownell's). Also, I use a bore brush one size larger for cleaning cylinders in my revolvers; try a .50 cal (for the .50 AE) brush in your .454 SRH.

Jim
 

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Same issue with a .357 Mag revolver when firing .38 Special.
I try to follow every range session with at least one full cylinder of .357 Mag to clean out the cylinders.
Not 100% sure it works, but I am always able to clean the remaining ring from the cylinders with a .44 mag brush.

My point is:
If you finalize your range trip with .454 rounds, it may assist in cleaning the ring from the cylinders.
 

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After using 38 Specials, I slather the cylinder with Hoppe's #9 and use a bronze brush that fits the cylinder (I think I use a 40 caliber brush). I works pretty well. I usually do it twice to get it all.

If it's really built up, i will sometimes put the brush in a slow drill and slather it with Hoppe's #9 and have at it.
 

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Just oil the cylinders with Breakfree CLP. If you brush the cylinders after every low power range trip there never should be a ring. Before deer season opens I oil the barrels on my plinking rifles and put them up. Deer season opens in October and it is usually March before the ground dries enough for having fun in the fields. I never have to use bore cleaner. Just a good scrubbing with a bronze brush. My barrels are spotless and look like they have been oiled after a lot of rounds. I am pretty lazy about cleaning my plinking rifles.
 

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Easiest way is to use a piece of choreboy copper scrubber on a bronze brush. BE SURE ITS
COPPER and not copper coated. Faster then anything you will ever try!!!! Works amazing on barrels as well. Most likely your issue is carbon but still not easy to remove with just chemicals.
 

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It probably is not lead. Any good solvent, such as Hoppe's No. 9, should do the trick.
"It probably is not lead. Any good solvent, such as Hoppe's No. 9, should do the trick"

Normally I agree, but I have two different sets of Ruger cylinders for a Blackhawk Bisley Convertible and they came in with two different chamber throat sizes. Factory said they wouldn't change the throat even for a fee. They said they made them "to shoot a wide variety of commercial bullets, and wouldn't adjust them for "reloads".
I reamed one out for lead bullets, left the other one small-ish for jacketed. Fortunately both sets fit both frames just fine so I *can* interchange safely but don't. I tested it to be sure my heirs had no kind of problem.

Reloaders tend to mark and label the heck out of everything with a mind towards someone else will inherit their work someday.

Radio George
 

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For lead removal, hands down, without a doubt Chore boy. I have a Lewis lead remover that I haven't touched since the first time I tried a few copper strands wrapped around a used brush.
 

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You could also try running an empty brass cartridge in from the front of the cylinder. It won't get it all, but it should cut through a chunk of the buildup.

L8R,
Matt
 

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I chucked a brass brush and one rod piece in my drill dipped in #9 and spun slow in my SS revolver and cleaned them rings right up from 38s in my 357.
 

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You could also try running an empty brass cartridge in from the front of the cylinder. It won't get it all, but it should cut through a chunk of the buildup.

L8R,
Matt
I've heard this before.. But how do you do that with a .357 magnum? The cart won't do that.. And I can't find a size that will? Any thought's on this?
 

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Easiest way is to use a piece of choreboy copper scrubber on a bronze brush. BE SURE ITS
COPPER and not copper coated. Faster then anything you will ever try!!!! Works amazing on barrels as well. Most likely your issue is carbon but still not easy to remove with just chemicals.
That's the absolute best way. I shoot a lot of lead in my 1911 and copper Chore Boys scrub it right out.
 

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i struggled with my .44 till a friend told me to use chore boy around a brass brush and some hoppes 9. didn't take much work after that.
 
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