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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone reload for a revolver with a 6 1/2" barrell? I bought one yesterday to use in the Bullseye Big Bore League & wondered if I needed to change grains or powders between it & my semi auto loads. For now I'll be using 230 gr FMJ, But will probably change to a LSWC when I get some time to test & tune. That dosen't look like it will happen anytime soon, so I'll stick with the 230gr bullits. How much pressure change will the longer barrell make? Maby not much, I don't know.
 

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Your revolver with a longer barrel will generate more velocity but the chamber pressure shouldn't be affected. Without knowing your load data, it's hard to say what will be needed when you switch to a lead bullet. Generally, because lead bullets seal better in the bore, less powder is required to get the same velocity as a jacketed bullet. Could you provide your load data?
 

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Don't think pressure is affected by the barrel length. The change to lead will require a different prescription. I assume you're talking about 45 but the barrel still doesn't matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The revolver is chambered in 45ACP. I just got back from the range. I had some 230gr FMJ over Bullseye powder loaded up so I tried them. 4.7gr, 5.0gr & 5.4gr. The pistol did the best with 5.0grs of Bullseye. These rounds were loaded useing a taper crimp with a COL of 1.26. They are for my 1911's & my XD45 Tactical. I will use this gun for Big Bore Bullseye competition. I'm sure I'll want to use a SWC of somekind. Probably lead & I guess I could use a lighter bullet also. This revolver stuff is new to me. Should I use a roll crimp & lenghten or shorten the COL? What about a different powder? I did like shooting the revolver,it handles pretty good. Thanks for the help you guys! This is one reason I like this forum. All the good people hang out here!
 

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kansas45, 5.1 gr of Bullseye is a max load for a 45 ACP with a 230 gr lead bullet (844 fps). With jacketed 230 gr bullets, you can go as high as 5.7 gr of BE (859 fps). As you can see, your 5.0 gr load, though well under max for a jacketed bullet, would be near max with a lead bullet.

Here's a basic reloading rule: All ammo loaded in rimless cases (ie: 45 ACP, 9mm, 40 S&W) get a taper crimp. Rimmed cases (ie: 38 Spec, 44 Mag, 45 LC etc.) generally get a roll crimp, however a taper crimp may also work.

The reason for a taper crimp on your 45 ACP ammo is the cylinder's chamber is designed just like a semi-auto chamber with a "stop" that contacts the case mouth. This prevents the case from entering the chamber too far and makes the case headspace properly (called headspacing on the case mouth). If you apply a roll crimp, it shortens the case allowing it to go too deep in the chamber, thus increasing headspace. This will cause problems such as: sticky extraction, jammed cylinder rotation, accuracy issues, and light primer hits or misfires. Headspace is the distance between the recoil shield and the case head. In most revolvers, it should be about .010" as measured with a gap gauge using a SAAMI spec case .898" long. Note: most 45 ACP brass is considerably shorter than SAAMI specs. An interesting note: you can actually chamber a 45 ACP case backwards (head first). The case will go into the chamber until the head hits the stop. Try it!

Rimmed cases use the rim to stop the cartridge from going too far into the chamber. This is called headspacing on the rim. The length of a rimmed case is not critical so a roll crimp is usually best but a taper crimp will also work with bullets that have no canalure.

Your COL sounds about right, however this can vary with the brand and style of bullet used. Not all brands of bullets are created equal so a 230 gr FMJ bullet can take on many shapes. Example: if you are using a Speer 230 gr FMJ, the COL would be 1.260". A Hornady 230 FMJ seats to 1.250" COL. Other brands could be different There are even more differences in hollow points.

Bullet seating depth is important for accuracy and chamber pressure, (also feeding in a semi-auto). The best way is to follow the bullet manufacturer's recommended seating depth.
 

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I prefer to use Win 231 for my .45 ACP loads, for both 1911, 25-2 and Ruger Blackhawk, and .45 AR for the 25-2 and Blackhawk. I have my Dillon set up to load .45 AR and ACP on the same die setup with just a change of shell plate. My preferred bullets are 200 LSWC and 200 JSWC (Hornady). I taper crimp both the ACP and AR. I also gage all the completed .45 ACP rounds to ensure proper functioning in the 1911. The rounds that don’t gage up properly are used for practice in the revolvers.
 
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