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Hello all, I haven't been into revolvers for a while but picked up an sp101 2.25 .357 and sent it off to Gemini for a full work over. Got it back Monday and got it to range today, gun looks and runs great but 158 grain .357's are brutal. .38's it's smooth as can be but I'm wondering if the super expensive custom wood grips are killing me and I should have forgone? I know most .357 snubs are rough but looking for others input with more experience in the revolver world. Thanks.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Small snub + 357 mag + wood grips = more felt recoil.

Even an SP with rubber grips has a punch. It sounds like what you're experiencing is pretty normal.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Pick up a pair of Hogues. They're affordable and make shooting easier. They ain't as pretty, but for range work... they work!
 

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Pick up a pair of Hogues. They're affordable and make shooting easier. They ain't as pretty, but for range work... they work!
I'll second that. The Hogues take a lot of the sting out of the equation.
 

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The problem with short barreled .357 revolvers is that the bullet leaves the barrel before all the powder is fully consumed. You end up with a big flash. Try shooting 38 spl. If you have access to a chronograph measure the muzzle velocities of both rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The problem with short barreled .357 revolvers is that the bullet leaves the barrel before all the powder is fully consumed. You end up with a big flash. Try shooting 38 spl. If you have access to a chronograph measure the muzzle velocities of both rounds.

.38's are no problem to shoot, I haven't put through a chrono but would be interested to see how close the 2 rounds are out a 2.25" barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1440036080.405957.jpg this is the picture Marc at Gemini sent me of my gun before I got it back, wood grips look great but I may have to abandon ship after reading all your replies..
 

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Try shooting 110 or 125 gr 357s. I was in the same boat but stock grip and the 158 hurt bad. The lighter ones are allot easier on the hand.

In fact last time I went shooting, I was shooting fast and one handed with the 110 gr magnums and still was under a fair amount of control.
 

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You're not going to change the basic math of 357m in a small gun.

But I agree 100% on the Hogues. I have them on my GP100 and Security Six with the short barrel. They make a world of difference.

I bought the guns because they shoot 357Mag so I won't dumb them down with 38SPL. Fix the grips.
 

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You're not going to change the basic math of 357m in a small gun.

But I agree 100% on the Hogues. I have them on my GP100 and Security Six with the short barrel. They make a world of difference.

I bought the guns because they shoot 357Mag so I won't dumb them down with 38SPL. Fix the grips.
Which hogues are we talking about?
 

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I actually prefer wood grips on a 357 magnum. It is not like your SP101 is a lightweight gun. You need to learn to allow the wood grips to absorb the recoil. When you fire the gun you want it to rock in your hand. If your gun has a hammer it should be in position to easily reach the hammer and pull it down. When you pull the hammer down the gun should naturally return to the firing position.

When you use a soft rubber grip the gun is locked in your hand. You are forced to absorb all the recoil right in the web of your right hand. There is no rocking action to allow the weight of the gun to absorb some of the recoil.

I am not the one to dispense advice on DAO revolvers. I have never owned a DAO revolver.
 

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From Land of Fruit & Nuts
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View attachment 19980 this is the picture Marc at Gemini sent me of my gun before I got it back, wood grips look great but I may have to abandon ship after reading all your replies..
The wood grips sure are purdy.
For shooting, I prefer the Hogues as well.
 

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No doubt, perceived recoil is significantly increased with fancy wood grips versus stock Hogue rubber grips as confirmed with my 6" GP100. Something else to watch out for with the SP101 - if you have larger hands, the increased grip size of rubber grips may cause your grip-hand knuckles to come in contact with the rear of the trigger guard. This I can further confirm with my former SP101 [2 boxes of .357's and my shooting station looked like a crime scene].
 

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Poorly fit custom grips aren't worth a penny. If they don't fit your hand, they don't fit your hand, whether they're rubber or wood. So if it's a FIT issue, you might be getting increased perceived recoil, simply because you have a hard time holding onto it.

If they fit your hand well, then it's likely a matter of grip. The SP101 isn't a high recoiling revolver. It's no pea shooter, but in the grand scheme of things, it's relatively well behaved. Rubber grips like the Hogues will protect your hand a little better, but it's quite possible that you don't have a proper grip technique.

So it's kinda like this - the grips have to fit your hand properly, but you also have to hold onto the grip properly. Despite the inexperienced advice that a lot of folks give online to "hold it however you feel comfortable and shoot the best," proper grip on a handgun is to squeeze tightly. Squeeze progressively tighter until you start shaking, then let off little by little until you stop shaking again - THAT is how hard you should grip. Just like firing a rifle - if you're shoulder a rifle (i.e. not firing free recoil on a bench), you have to snug the rifle securely to your shoulder. Revolvers don't have buttstocks to secure to your shoulder, so you have to secure the grip to your hand instead. I've taught hundreds of new shooters and trained several competitive shooters - that grip technique works, limp grips do not.

A 27oz SP101 with full house 357mags even with wood grips isn't so bad that most shooters should need padding. It's really just not that bad. Part of me wants to just say "harden up". But it's probably more likely that you're not gripping properly.
 
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