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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone shot both, the .454 with the shorter Alaskan barrel vs the 5" barrel?
How do they compare? Recoil comparison? If you've shot both, what % would you say the shorter has more recoil? e.g. The Alaskan has 30% more recoil or such.
And accuracy out of both?
Thanks for any input.
 

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I would think the extra velocity out of the 5" barrel would cause more recoil although it wouldn't be that much. The 5" barrel with its longer sight radius would give a distinct advantage on accuracy.
 

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I have only shot a 7.5" Super Redhawk and a Freedom Arms that was around the same length so I can't really tell which one of those particular is going to without a doubt be better or worse.

What I can offer is compare a set of 357 Magnum. I have shot a 3" GP 100 and a 4" and 6" at the same time. Shooting the same ammo I can tell you without a doubt that the 3" model had much more felt recoil and a whole lot more muzzle blast than the 6". It even had a bit more than the 4". Accuracy was a bit better with the 4" and 6" as well. It might have been because the 3" didn't have a rear sight only a rear sight groove.

Shooting my 4-5/8" blackhawk and 7-1/2" 45 Colts I notice a difference as well. Large case capacity needs more barrel to make use of the larger powder charge. Would be the same for the longer 454 Casull.

I know this isn't the exact answer you are wanting to read but I am sure The comparison would be similar.
 

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Here's my take on it. Longer barrel = less barrel deflection but the energy goes somewhere. You get more into the palm of your hand with the longer barrel. Plus the longer barrel means the bullet is in the gun longer. Again, more felt recoil. The snubbie tries to jump violently out of your hand but you just have to control it as best you can.

Yes the longer sight radius makes it easier to shoot accurately, but I hear that doesn't necessarily mean the gun is more accurate. 5" barrel also gives you the option to add a scope.

I like the shorter one because it's easier to carry and to draw in a hurry. It's concealable now I added some smaller wooden grips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. Still hard to say. Yep Boar, it was a good analogy, I can identify with that. I have a snub 357 and a 5", and the 5" is more manageable and accurate.
I'll just have to keep looking at youtubes I guess. Some on there say the S&W 500 with 5" and port is less recoil, slightly, than the flame throwing hand shaker BCC has. I love my 44 Alaskan too.
One guy on youtube was saved by his .454 Alaskan, by popping 3 rounds into a charging grizz...it was the 3rd shot that did it.
Okay, back to the drawing board.
One more thing, have you had any problem with crimp creep with yours BCC?
 

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The Alaskan has considerably more flip and felt recoil than the Toklat, using the same loads. The recoil on either is violent, but the muzzle flip on the Alaskan makes it much more painful in hand. The Toklat hits your entire hand, whereas you'll feel the entirety of the recoil in the Alaskan in the web of your thumb and index finger.

The Alaskan is plenty accurate, but you need to mount a red dot on top to get its best out of it. The extra sight radius of the Toklat helps a lot, but it's also dramatically improved by adding a red dot - or better still - adding a scope. I have 2 Toklats and 5 Alaskans, I can be far more accurate with either Toklat than with any of my Alaskans - even using the same red-dot up top. It's a better balancing revolver, and handles more smoothly on target.

The 5.5" Toklat is the best balancing and handling DA revolver I own (out of about 35-40 44mag, 45colt, 454, 480, and 475line DA revolvers from Taurus, Smith, DW, and Ruger).

Neither is "friendly." The recoil from any 454C revolver is extreme.
 

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One more thing, have you had any problem with crimp creep with yours BCC?
You didn't ask me, but I can comment on my experience.

With the 454C Toklat, and with the 454C 7.5" SRH, I have not had any crimp jump unless I did a partial reload and left the unfired rounds in the cylinder, and that is rare in itself.

With the Alaskan, I 100% of the time get crimp jump with 260grn Magtech loads. This usually happens within the first 1 to 3 shots - the cylinder will lock up and I'm unable to fire the remaining 3-4 shots because they've jumped and locked up the cylinder.

Scroll down to post #32 in this thread to see another discussion on these rounds - post #32, 37, 39 - 44 discuss the Magtech failures:

Page 3 of RF.net Ruger Alaskan 454 Casull thread

Here are the pictures I shared in that thread - an example of the crimp jump and how it will lock up your revolver:





I have not had crimp jumps with Hornady 300grn loads or Federal Fusion 260grn loads. I roll my own 90% of the time for 454C, but based on my accuracy, reliability, and game killing performance, I shoot the Hornady 300grn loads almost exclusively for factory loads.
 

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I haven't shot many Magtechs but I bought a box that had been returned to the LGS. Three rounds in the box had jumped crimp like the ones pictured above. I have shot a lot of Hornady 300 xtp rounds. They don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Kansas, that did it.
Whoa lot of creep in those photos.
Nice looking pieces.
 

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It never made very much sense to me to have a barrel length barely longer than the cartridge that feeds it. The ballistics just don't make sense. But (answering the unasked question), I know of two grizzly bears taken down with the short barreled Alaskan. One was by Greg Bush in Soldotna who was charded by a starving 600 lb specinine and one was from a fellow who told me that he is alive today because he was able to clear his holster primarily because of the short barrel. Two testimonials 1) to the effectiveness of the short barrelled revolver and 2) to the edge in speed of deployment.

It is also irrefutable that the shorter barrel is easier to carry in a belt holster, but that is a matter of personal shape and taste.

For myself, 5.5" is as short as I would go, Maybe 4".

If you are interested in hunting or accuracy, note that the Alaskan models do not have the scope scallops in the grame like the other models do.

All unasked questions, but these are my thoughts.

Lost Sheep
 

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At one point, I had an Alaskan 480 and custom 6-inch SRH in 480. The 6-incher definitely recoiled harder than the Alaskan. I just chalked it up to there being more overall weight from that heavy bull barrel. I never experienced any crimp jump with either revolver, although I only fired a few rounds through the Alaskan. Anyway I kept the 6 inch SRH and sold the Alaskan. I had no practical purpose for it, living in a state where there aren't any grizzly bears.
 

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Agree 100% with Lost Sheep. I will add the following - If you're looking at the Alaskan in 454, take a look at the Redhawk 45LC with 4 inch barrel. It will shoot Buffalobore 325 grain bullets at 1250 fps. That's a serious bear load with more sight radius and less muzzle flip than the Alaskan.


If you're location is the Yukon, why are you considering a 2.5 inch barrel? Don't you need at least a 4.2 inch barrel in Canada?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Hmmm, didn't know about the Redhawk 45LC with 4 inch...
I'm liking it. Now it's btw it and the 5" Toklat.
I wonder, would this 45LC 4" be okay with hot Garrett loads, e.g.
365 grain at 1350 fps for 1476 ft lbs? thus essentially a .454 load? Or would
that be too much?

I like that 4" barrel though. Beautiful piece, and having much more appreciation for this 45 Colt cartridge, anywhere from 44 special loads to low .454 loads in power.

edit: after some research, I'm thinking not good to shoot too many of those...perhaps 1200 ft lbs would be the max you'd want to shoot. The 45lc is designed for pressures of around 25000 cup, not as high as a 44 magnum nor a .454. If one really wants those
1400+ ft lb loads, get the .454.
 

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I have the Alaskan and Standard SRH in .454, the standard has worse recoil. I am sure it would not be any better in the 5”, I mainly shoot the 240gr and 300gr Hornady loads out of them.
 

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Albert,

there are 4 different power levels for 45LC. You need to know what they are and what guns they apply to -

14KPSI standard SAMMI
20KPSI S&W revolvers
32KCUP Ruger Only Loads
40KPSI REDHAWK Only loads

The Redhawk only loads are published by Brian Pearce in Handloader magazine. He provides some load data as well.

What it means is that a REDHAWK in 45LC can run the same pressures as 44Mag+P (36KPSI +10%)

You are not giving up anything with the Redhawk in 45LC. It's a very strong gun.

I've tested 345 grain hardcast bullets at 1235 fps with my RH with no problems.

It's not easy to reload for 45LC. You need to understand what your gun can handle and work up loads for it. It's easier to just buy the Toklat in 454.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Thanks Ralph. I won't reload, will just buy off the shelf.
Am liking that 4.2" Redhawk 45 Colt more and more...seems to be a great
compromise btw the Alaskan and longer 5". (and it is NO compromise really)
It gets great reviews by everyone
and their brother.
Thanks all. I pulled the trigger.
 
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