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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone brought their RAR's in a long range clinic? I would like to know how it worked.

I signed up for a long range class in Oct 31. We shoot up to 1000 yards. My RAR 30-06 is my first and only centerfire. I probably had 2000 rounds on it. The farthest I have shot it is 400 yards and it is accurate; hits clay pigeons every time until the barrel heats up.

The class progressively shoots from 100 yards to 1000 yards. I reload and have developed loads that are supposed to be supersonic at 1k. I also plan to install a 20moa base. Scope is a Hawke Endurance 30 6-24x 50mm. I have confidence the load and rifle will make it beyond 1k.

My main concern would be the barrel heating. By the time we get to 1k, the barrel might be warmer but that is where I need the most accuracy. The instructor suggested I shoot less at the shorter ranges to save the barrel for the longer ones. But the less you shoot, the less fun it is, right?

I am actually thinking about getting a heavy barrel 30-06 for the class like the Remington 700 LR, unless it has been proven that the RAR will do well for such a purpose.

Anything you have to say is appreciated. thanks.
 

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Any standard barrel rifle will heat up and string the rounds. Free floating the barrel will help. Bull barrels just take longer to heat up.
 

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I've never attended a long range class .... one would think that they would structure the class so as to give the barrels time to cool
 

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If you are thinking about buying a different rifle for the class..........buy a heavy barrel 308. And BEFORE all the 30-06 lovers jump on me..........let me tell you why. First, heavy barrel 308s are everywhere in rifles much more prepared for what you are getting ready to do. Second, 308 "match grade" ammo is available on shelves at nearly any store that has ammo. For all but the heaviest bullets, the 308 will equal the 30-06 in velocity and burn LESS powder doing it. You burn less powder, you heat the barrel less.

A long range shooting class with a sporter weight barrel rifle, in a caliber that is not a great long range round, will not allow you to get near as much out of the class as you possibly could. And since the thought of a new rifle has already crossed your mind anyway...........go for it
 

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If you are thinking about buying a different rifle for the class..........buy a heavy barrel 308. And BEFORE all the 30-06 lovers jump on me..........let me tell you why. First, heavy barrel 308s are everywhere in rifles much more prepared for what you are getting ready to do. Second, 308 "match grade" ammo is available on shelves at nearly any store that has ammo. For all but the heaviest bullets, the 308 will equal the 30-06 in velocity and burn LESS powder doing it. You burn less powder, you heat the barrel less.

A long range shooting class with a sporter weight barrel rifle, in a caliber that is not a great long range round, will not allow you to get near as much out of the class as you possibly could. And since the thought of a new rifle has already crossed your mind anyway...........go for it
I was just about to chime in that .30-06 would not be my first choice for dedicated long range shooting. If you don't give that barrel time to cool in between shots, you will have a hard time hitting anything after the first few shots.
 

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If you are going to use a budget rifle I would use a Savage Axis II xp or a Savage 110. You can find a Savage Axis II xp for around $400 with a heavy barrel. People are already making YouTube videos of the Axis II at 1,000 yards with the stock weaver scope. My neighbor has won a bunch of F1 matches. All she uses is Savage actions to build her guns. Really there isn't a lot of difference in Savage sporting rifle with a heavy barrel and a F1 rifle other than the 15lb stock and she chambers everything in 260 remington. Yes, the F1 rifle is a bit more complicated but you get the idea. The difference is a lot of little tiny things that add up to a much more accurate rifle.

She comes here a lot to shoot at my rimfire range. I have a bunch of shooting toys that make it easy to burn up a brick of 22lr ammo. You may get more out of NRA smallbore on a limited budget. If you can hit a target the size of a pencil eraser every time with a 22lr at 50 yards using iron sights a 1,000 yard shot with a scope is pretty easy.
 

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While a fine hunting round, the 30-06 is just not a "go to" long range target round. Especially with a sporter weight barreled rifle. In a class such as this, you will shoot a LOT of rounds and you immediately have two things going against you. One is the recoil of a hard hitting round in a light weight hunting rifle. Two is the heat in the light barrel. The program is NOT going to allow enough time for the barrel to cool. The purpose of the class is to teach you proper technique and learn how to properly come up with the DOPE on your scope. Don't handicap yourself with a rifle that may not be up to the challenge.

Nothing is EASY at 1000 yards, even on calm days, as crosswind and the coriolis effect come into play. So you need a MINIMUM of a consistent 1 MOA rifle. Most light hunting rifles do NOT meet that requirement.......because 1 MOA rifle at 1000 yards is a 10" group. So if your hunting rig MAY stack 3 shots in a 1 MOA group, if it won't do it with 10 shots and a hot barrel, at 1000 it is going to be a shot gun pattern
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the great replies, I am trying to put them all together, and I think I (almost) have a plan.

No worries about suggesting 308 (or other calibers) I was actually considering the 308 before I decided to lean more towards the 30-06.

The reason why I thought about another 30-06 is because I already load for it, so no need for another set of dies and, especially, good brass. A heavy barrel will allow me to shoot more. It can also become my backup hunting rifle. If after the class I decide long range shooting is for me, I can then decide on a good caliber for that purpose.

I like the idea of practicing on the 22LR for trigger time on smaller targets. I actually have the RAR in 22LR for target practice, but I have not been shooting it lately because I have been doing more load development for the 06.

But something in me is still thinking of pushing the RAR for the class. I know it will not be easy. But I have become very comfortable shooting it, the cheek rest, eye relief, shouldering, the way the rifle moves in recoil, almost everything is second nature to me.

I will think about it more. Please keep the inputs and suggestions coming. I should be able to decide in a week or so. I want more trigger time on the gun before bringing it to the class.
 

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Another issue is a most sporting rifles that are sold with a heavy barrel is not really a heavy barrel. You might want to attend a F1 match so you can see what long range rifles really look like and how they are equipped.

I have a nice Weatherby 30/06 hunting rifle that will shoot a sub .5" 3 shot group at 100 yards with match ammo. I have put it on a lead sled to test the rifle and it shot a group just over .4". But if someone was to take my rifle out and start shooting a bunch of 10 shot strings I would literally go ballistic. After 7 or 8 shots the barrel on my 22 mag is hot to the touch. You can imagine what the barrel would feel like on a 30/06.

You want a rifle chambered in a child of a 308 win cartridge with a true heavy barrel. The 7mm-08 or a 243 is a decent choice. Reloading equipment is cheap and easy to come by. If you want to change the caliber you can simply change the barrel to another child of the 308.

Long range shooting is not a inexpensive hobby. It costs more to reload true match grade ammo than it does to buy quality hunting ammo. You are going to spend a lot of money on things you cannot even imagine until you get involved with long range shooting.

Going to a long range school sounds like a great idea but it is not something that is very practical. You really shouldn't take shots at over 300 yards at game animals for a variety of reasons. I do not want to hijack the thread so I am not getting into details. Given the rifle you own you are not a candidate for competition. You would burn up the barrel on your American in a 3 gun match.
 

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Just because someone wants to learn to shoot at 1000 yards, does not mean they intend to hunt game at that range or get into match shooting. I think long range classes are a good idea for any hunter, regardless of the range they hunt at. It will teach proper technique and actually how to use that cool reticle you have and learn to use the turrets on your scope, instead of using "Kentucky windage" on game shots. If you learn to consistently make 1000 yards shots, shorter shots on game animals become very easy. Makes you a better short range shooter. And while you don't need a 5K BR rig to do it, you do need something better than a budget grade sporter rifle in a hunting chambering.
And as stated earlier, fairly low cost, heavy barrel 308s that will get the job done are on every used gun rack in about any store. As well as match ammo on the shelves, so even if the OP chooses not to add that caliber to his reloading bench, quality ammo is still readily available and low priced
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Another issue is a most sporting rifles that are sold with a heavy barrel is not really a heavy barrel. You might want to attend a F1 match so you can see what long range rifles really look like and how they are equipped.

I have a nice Weatherby 30/06 hunting rifle that will shoot a sub .5" 3 shot group at 100 yards with match ammo. I have put it on a lead sled to test the rifle and it shot a group just over .4". But if someone was to take my rifle out and start shooting a bunch of 10 shot strings I would literally go ballistic. After 7 or 8 shots the barrel on my 22 mag is hot to the touch. You can imagine what the barrel would feel like on a 30/06.

You want a rifle chambered in a child of a 308 win cartridge with a true heavy barrel. The 7mm-08 or a 243 is a decent choice. Reloading equipment is cheap and easy to come by. If you want to change the caliber you can simply change the barrel to another child of the 308.

Long range shooting is not a inexpensive hobby. It costs more to reload true match grade ammo than it does to buy quality hunting ammo. You are going to spend a lot of money on things you cannot even imagine until you get involved with long range shooting.

Going to a long range school sounds like a great idea but it is not something that is very practical. You really shouldn't take shots at over 300 yards at game animals for a variety of reasons. I do not want to hijack the thread so I am not getting into details. Given the rifle you own you are not a candidate for competition. You would burn up the barrel on your American in a 3 gun match.
Thanks OldCrow.

I understand long range precision shooting can be very expensive: the rifle (or rifles!), the reloading equipment and components, plus your time. I am not ready for that. :)

The reason I want to go to class is definitely not about hunting. I just want to try it out and see if I like it. For recreational hunting, I am on the same line of thinking and do not shoot at game beyond the maximum point-blank range, which is around 300 yards for me. Even at 300 yards, if I know I can get closer I would; I prefer to stalk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think long range classes are a good idea for any hunter, regardless of the range they hunt at. It will teach proper technique and actually how to use that cool reticle you have and learn to use the turrets on your scope, instead of using "Kentucky windage" on game shots. If you learn to consistently make 1000 yards shots, shorter shots on game animals become very easy.
This++.

I did not shoot better at 100 yards until I started shooting way beyond that. Shooting at longer ranges can amplify the effects of bad habits. Another thing I find interesting about long range shooting is learning to shoot in the wind.
 

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taking the class with the intent of learning techniques and being able to work with a trained instructor would be a very good thing .... I could do that with fewer rounds than if I was training for some sort of competition that requires throwing enough down range to over heat my rifle's barrel .... 1000 yards is a bit over a half mile, to me that would be fun to try
 

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"ringing steel' at 1000 yards is definitely fun the first time you do it, but after that is when the serious about it factor can come in. I now own several rifles that shoot less than 1/2 MOA at 1000 yards. Yep, that's less than 5" groups at that range and will do it every time. My 300 RUM custom shoots low 4s

When you get adept at long range.........makes "short" ranges, like 400-500-600 plumb boring..........LOL!!!

I have a 350 yard range in my backyard and that seems like childs play now.
 

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A 1/2 moa @ 1000 yards. :rolleyes: Ummmm, yeah right,,, sounds legit.
 

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A 1/2 moa @ 1000 yards. :rolleyes: Ummmm, yeah right,,, sounds legit.
Yeah.......that's a 5" group at 1000 yards and I have more than one rifle that will do 5 shot groups in that area............here is a link to a 10 shot record group of 2.6872. http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2014/04/best-10-shot-1000-yard-group-in-history-be-amazed/............or how about this 5 shot group at less than 1.5" at 1000 yards http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2007/07/sarver-shoots-1403-group-at-1000-yards/...........or how about a 3.806 group at 1680 yards. That's .44 MOA
http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2008/04/ultra-long-range-044-moa-at-1680-yards-with-a-338/

Or peruse these 1000 yard records and be sure and look at size of groups and number of shots http://www.bergerbullets.com/national-records/nbrsa-1000yd-records/

Obviously you know nothing about bench rest shooting. I am just a hobby BR shooter and only shoot some local matches, but have picked up a plaque or two.

My 300RUM custom with 12-42x56 Nightforce glass that has fired several low 4" five shot groups at 1000 yards


Custom built Savage in 6.5x284 Norma with Black Diamond 32X Burris that also shoots 1/2 MOA or less at 1000 yards


Top rifle is a Hart custom with Sightron 50X glass in 300 WSM that's shoots as well as the other two
 

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I was ringing 18" steel at 250yds yesterday with the RAR 30-06. Its fun and my shoulder still hurts LOL!

I have had the same issue on my -06 of the barrel heating so if they will let you, let it cool for accuracy. I don't see where a bull barrel will have any more accuracy after it gets warm, a hot barrel is a hot barrel.

I'm very impressed with the accuracy of the RAR 30-06 and its light weight. I need to weigh mine but its comfortable to carry all day with a Burris FF2 3-9x40 scope and Galco Ching Sling
 

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Just because someone wants to learn to shoot at 1000 yards, does not mean they intend to hunt game at that range or get into match shooting. I think long range classes are a good idea for any hunter, regardless of the range they hunt at. It will teach proper technique and actually how to use that cool reticle you have and learn to use the turrets on your scope, instead of using "Kentucky windage" on game shots. If you learn to consistently make 1000 yards shots, shorter shots on game animals become very easy. Makes you a better short range shooter. And while you don't need a 5K BR rig to do it, you do need something better than a budget grade sporter rifle in a hunting chambering.
And as stated earlier, fairly low cost, heavy barrel 308s that will get the job done are on every used gun rack in about any store. As well as match ammo on the shelves, so even if the OP chooses not to add that caliber to his reloading bench, quality ammo is still readily available and low priced
No doubt that this guy ↑ does not like a 30-06 and is on a mission to convince everyone that the 30-06 is not a target round and only a "hunting cartridge". The 30-06 was not designed to hunt with.....unless you're talking about hunting man. If I'm not mistaken, the 30-06 has a longer confirmed kill than a .308 does. About 400 yards more if I recall right.

To the op, if you already got all the stuff to load for a 30-06 and you find a gun that you want for the job, go for it. It'll do everything a .308 will do, but a little better.
 
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