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Hello,
I recently purchased a Ruger GP100 in .327 Federal. If I shoot ANY .32 H&R Magnum loads in it at all, and then attempt to shoot some .327 Federal, the only way to extract the rounds from the cylinder is with a plastic mallet. I don't recall ever having this problem shooting .38 Specials in a .357 Magnum revolver. Does this gun need to go back to Ruger? I know some of the earlier run of GP100s in .327 needed to go back and have a new cylinder fitted to solve problems, but this gun was made in 2019. Any thoughts?
 

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What do you see?
Is there a visible crud ring after the 32mags ?
When you shoot the 327s or 32mags is there a lot of carbon residue on the fired brass ?
Do the insides of the chambers look egg shaped , scratched or rough ?
When you insert a shell is there a lot of side to side play or is it snug ?
Ammo , factory or reload ? How many rounds have you tried ?If factory what kind of ammo ?
All part of figuring out if there is a problem.
 

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Scrub it down good after shooting your 32's and see if that's the problem. Then you can go from there.
 

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If you shoot the shorter non-magnum versions of a round, first, you'll get fouling accumulation around the chamber exit. When you put the longer magnum rounds into the chamber afterwards, the mouths of those longer cases will be surrounded by the fouling, and when you fire them, they expand and become stuck against that ring of fouling.

As the earlier posters stated, you need to scrub your chambers thoroughly after firing shorter non-magnum rounds. If you choose to shoot both magnum and non-magnum rounds during a single range session, it is best to fire the magnum rounds before firing the non-magnum rounds.
 

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This is a recurring problem you will never solve! You only recourse is to p.m. me, so I can relieve you of this flawed firearm, lol!

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

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Just a coincidence, but I had mine out yesterday. (I've been trying to find the right gun in my small assortment to shoot one-handed because of a recent rotator cuff operation, luckily on my left shoulder.) My friend & I shot a few 85 gr FMs without incident. Then, just to show him I could, we shot a cylinder each of .32 ACP, just to show him how cool this chambering is. I had one light strike that fired the 2nd time around. I had some difficulty extracting the ACPs but they came out with a little more pressure on the rod. I think it was because the rim sunk in more than revolver rounds. I ran some .32 S&W longs and they came right out, but I didn't try any more magnums, which I should have. I seem to recall them a little tough but manageable extracting them the last time after shooting the smaller-cased cartridges. I brushed out the chambers and it worked fine, so I suppose you may want to take a brass cylinder brush with you next time & try that before going all Kung Fu on the cylinder chambers.
It is pretty weird though shooting the light loads after the FMs. Those things literally felt like a BB gun compared to the magnums! Jimmy thought his 1st round was a squib. I'm surprised this size chambering is not more popular, as it is powerful yet very easy to control even with the heavier 125 gr bullet. Just my 2 cents!
 
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