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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
While picking up my Black Friday Special Remington Model 770 rifle today at GM, I saw a guy checking out a Ruger Gunsite Scout rifle. I got to handle it as well. My... that was a beautiful gun! Certainly much nicer then what I was buying.

However, I had to question the need for what seems to be essentially a tactical bolt action .308 carbine, with military style sights, etc. For the same price or less you could get a Mini-14, which is a much more sensible "tactical" option if you were going that route. Neither would I want to be shooting expensive .308 rounds as a recreational pursuit very often. :eek:

Still, it was a beautiful piece of work, and if I was a collector and had the extra money I might get one myself.
 

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For those who don't know, the Gunsite scout rifle is a concept championed by the late Jeff Cooper, who also founded the Gunsite training facility. Ruger collaborated with Gunsite on this rifle hence the name.

Jeff Cooper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gunsite Training Center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I'm happy with my GSR, it does what it is designed for and the 308 will take care of most big game hunting I'll likely ever do in the lower 48. Is there a need? For a guy like me who was looking for my first upgrade from the 30-30 this was a great option, especially when offered in southpaw. Need is highly subjective though, please don't ask mrs fungun lol
 

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I’ve gone in circles on this question, but have settled on the following justification for a Ruger GSR:

At this moment, I have both 22LR & 9mm handguns for plinking & home defense, along with a couple of 22LR rifles for the same purposes. My next planned acquisitions are a PC9m (to use as my primary HD long-gun), followed by a GSR.

Before anyone jumps in an says a “pistol carbine” is a waste, I like the fact that a stray round won’t go thru my neighbor’s neighbor’s wall if I ever have to use it and my property is only a ¼ acre; a 9mm Carbine will be a perfect HD weapon when not in close combat. I see the GSR and it’s 308/7.62 rounds as a great long range/ high power compliment to my 22LR & 9mm arsenal. Plus by going this route, I only need to keep 3 cartridges “in stock” (22LR, 9mm & .308)

If I can’t find a PC9, I may go ahead and grab a Mini-14 and then keep looking for a PC9; but I’ll still want a GSR at some point because I feel it’s a better round if I ever have to engage a hardened target. The downside of this approach is that I’ll have to keep 4 cartridges on-hand. So from my standpoint, the GSR offers the additional punch of the 308 platform, in a cost effective platform…

NOTE: I realize that there the AR platform would provide the ability to run 2 or more of the above rounds, utilizing a common lower. My preference to the PC9/Mini platform is two-fold:
  • I believe that a new AWB is more likely than not and think that AR style weapons are likely to be at the center of that legislation
  • Mini-14 = based on the Garand style action, enough said…

NOTE 2: I also understand that the above may be an elaborate rationalization to buy a GSR!!
 

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Larry the Conservative
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I once tried to limit the numbers of calibers I keep in the safe, and mostly I still look real hard at any gun that'll cause me to add to the shopping list when I head out for reloading components. However a 308 is hardly in the same category as some wildcat round that shoots a bullet .005" larger than a .308. I confess to still not allowing a .17 rifle into my safe - the ammo cost is absurd!

There are lots of guns that shoot the NATO round, there are lots of gun that shoot the same bullet as the .308, and there's a lot more out there that will handle the .308 NATO bullet in an emergency. That don't mean much now, but in a world with total gun control, it could be very critical.

And since I brought up the possible AWB, the GSR might pass early limitations of rifle ownership since it is a bolt gun. 10 round mags seem to be "acceptable to gungrabber libs and the flash hider might cause some heartburn for them, but I guess a screw on nut in place of the hider might be a good move.

Better yet, vote for people who respect the constitution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
[*]I believe that a new AWB is more likely than not and think that AR style weapons are likely to be at the center of that legislation
[*]Mini-14 = based on the Garand style action, enough said…
[/LIST]

NOTE 2: I also understand that the above may be an elaborate rationalization to buy a GSR!!
Agreed. The GSR might make sense if a future AWB happens, but if we get to that point it would probably only be a matter of time before they go after the GSR and others like it as well, so buy everything whilst thou can.

Once the holier-then-thou liberals get the ball rolling, they will never be satisfied and will always look for a way or an excuse to control every aspect of your lives.

That is why we must never let it get to that point, and fight them every inch of the way.
 

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.... the possible AWB, the GSR might pass early limitations of rifle ownership since it is a bolt gun. 10 round mags seem to be "acceptable to gungrabber libs ....

Better yet, vote for people who respect the constitution.
The thought that the GSR will fire a standard NATO round and also might not be "on the list" also crossed my mind ....

And yeah, how about it!! Seems to me that the majority votes based on "what's in it for me" because it's easier than accepting responsibility for their own actions (or lack there of)!!!
 

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I didn't get my GSR for tactical use but I have run it through the carbine course = great fun!

My first attraction to it was that it was a peep sighted bolt gun in a versatile caliber. As a reloader and a caster I've run a wide spectrum of projectiles through it. 0# buck bunny busters on up to 220 grains. The four loads I use the most are.

-115 gr Lyman 311008 over W231 pushed to ~930 fps for plinking, cheap repetitions, new shooter instruction, small game and vermin.

-165 gr JSP pushed to 2575 with IMR 3031. Very accurate in the GSR and the one I use for Big Game Hunting.

-190 gr Lyman 311334 over SR 4759, 1900 fps is the load I use in competitions (paper and steel) Very accurate.

-220 gr Lyman 311284 over W231, 980 fps is my subsonic load that I'll use when I get approval for a can. Basically its a 300 Blackout ballistics in a 308 case. This bullet is also very accurate and fun on the steel both at subsonic and supersonic velocities.


Working on the 400 yard steel with the GSR

Great gun. Very versatile right out of the box.

 

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Need? Yes, deer season opens Monday here. Deer hunting was my first thought when I handled the GSR @ the NRA show when they first came out. It cured me of wanting an AR; it and the CZ-527 in 7.62 x 39.

The SR concept was developed for the rifleman, using 1-2 well placed shots. It was to be powerful enough for hunting or defense, light and handy.

After Jan. I will either get a GSR or build a compact rifle.
 

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I keep trying to justify a GSR, but haven’t yet found a reason to buy one. I like the looks of the rifle. I like the 7.62X51mm|.308 round. I carried an M14 in Viet Nam. I also carried an M-16. I much prefer the 7.62 for longer range shots.

I have an AR-10 in 7.62 with a 20” barrel. I have AR-15s with 16” and 24” barrels. I have hunting rifles with 22” or 24” barrels. I prefer the extra velocity from the longer barrels and a higher power scope for longer range hunting shots.

The only reason I can come up with to buy a GSR is if I hunted in heavy brush and then I would use a five round magazine. I have a Marlin lever action .45/70 for that purpose.

Short barrels are great for clearing rooms in a building. But then I would want a semi-auto for that purpose.

If they offered it with an option of a 20” or 22” barrel, I would probably buy one.
 

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I keep trying to justify a GSR, but haven’t yet found a reason to buy one. I like the looks of the rifle. I like the 7.62X51mm|.308 round. I carried an M14 in Viet Nam. I also carried an M-16. I much prefer the 7.62 for longer range shots.

I have an AR-10 in 7.62 with a 20” barrel. I have AR-15s with 16” and 24” barrels. I have hunting rifles with 22” or 24” barrels. I prefer the extra velocity from the longer barrels and a higher power scope for longer range hunting shots.

The only reason I can come up with to buy a GSR is if I hunted in heavy brush and then I would use a five round magazine. I have a Marlin lever action .45/70 for that purpose.

Short barrels are great for clearing rooms in a building. But then I would want a semi-auto for that purpose.

If they offered it with an option of a 20” or 22” barrel, I would probably buy one.
most of the "I won't buy one" type comments I see about the GSR are like yours, where someone already has a pile of rifles and doesn't see how the GSR adds to the pile. When you're starting with a clean slate the GSR makes a lot more sense.
 

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For those who don't know, the Gunsite scout rifle is a concept championed by the late Jeff Cooper, who also founded the Gunsite training facility. Ruger collaborated with Gunsite on this rifle hence the name.

Jeff Cooper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gunsite Training Center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That's it. It seems that quite a few people don't know or understand the reason for the scout rifle. Ruger wrapped it up with the slogan that goes with the GSR....The one rifle to have if you could only have one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Need? Yes, deer season opens Monday here. Deer hunting was my first thought when I handled the GSR @ the NRA show when they first came out. It cured me of wanting an AR; it and the CZ-527 in 7.62 x 39.

The SR concept was developed for the rifleman, using 1-2 well placed shots. It was to be powerful enough for hunting or defense, light and handy.

After Jan. I will either get a GSR or build a compact rifle.
Hunting in a pinch perhaps, but I'd rather have a true full size rifle for that purpose. Plus, one could also snipe with the latter type more effectively if they had to.
 

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If it were the only rifle I was allowed to have, I would definitely want a 22" barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
most of the "I won't buy one" type comments I see about the GSR are like yours, where someone already has a pile of rifles and doesn't see how the GSR adds to the pile. When you're starting with a clean slate the GSR makes a lot more sense.
I pretty much have a clean slate, but at this time I'd go with a Mini-14 for that money.

The GSR is gorgeous though, and something I'd think about getting after I already have my other firearm priorities taken care of.
 

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I pretty much have a clean slate, but at this time I'd go with a Mini-14 for that money.

The GSR is gorgeous though, and something I'd think about getting after I already have my other firearm priorities taken care of.
I'm guessing that hunting large critters isn't on your radar?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I'm guessing that hunting large critters isn't on your radar?
It's not something I plan on seriously getting into, but I just got a Remington 770 rifle w/scope and case on Black Friday if I ever get the chance to tag along with someone on a hunting trip. What I'd really like to do is go duck/pheasant hunting someday, so I'm looking at a shotgun for my next purchase.

Who knows though, things may change. :)
 

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For those who don't know, the Gunsite scout rifle is a concept championed by the late Jeff Cooper, who also founded the Gunsite training facility. Ruger collaborated with Gunsite on this rifle hence the name.

Jeff Cooper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gunsite Training Center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I'm happy with my GSR, it does what it is designed for and the 308 will take care of most big game hunting I'll likely ever do in the lower 48. Is there a need? For a guy like me who was looking for my first upgrade from the 30-30 this was a great option, especially when offered in southpaw. Need is highly subjective though, please don't ask mrs fungun lol
I've been looking for the GSR for quite awhile for that very reason (southpaw version), I love the looks of that rifle, but nobody in my area has been able to get one in stock since they were introduced.....Not even a right hand version, let alone a lefty! I've even tried to special order one, without success. So the wait continues!!!!!:(
 

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The critical advantage of the scout rifle is its versatility.

There are certainly some very fine sporting bolt action rifles that probably perform better than the GSR with respect to hunting (Sako, Steyr, and custom outfits like Cooper, etc.) and there are certainly better options for combat.

However, it's primary advantage is that it does a little bit of everything well enough if you do your part.

The late Mel Tappan wrote that firearms are specialized tools and no one firearm can fulfill multiple roles. He was correct and that was the reason he divided firearms into two classifications, "working" and "defense".

IMO, the scout rifle (GSR) IS the jack of all trades though probably master of none. It is the only firearm that comes close to being a "one size fits all" solution.

If I could only have one rifle, it would be a scout rifle.
 

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Tactical Rifle, Do you need one?
Do you need to wear underwear.
I say if you look at need than most of the Firearm stuff we buy you don't need.
Hell yes you need one.
I know this is a Ruger Forum But, for great fun & low cost look at the Savage MKII series of rifles. Mine is a .22 cal.
I have a MKII T.R.. It came with a Factory Free Floating Button Heavy Fluted Barrel. They come from the factory with a adjustable trigger. I bought mine previously owned & it has a Mueller 4 x 14 Scope & a Harris Bi-pod with Factory Boyd Stock. The Gun is heavy & is Extremely accurate.
I only use CCI Mini Mag. There for the scope is always sighted in & you don't have to mess with it. You can dial the yards on the front of the scope. Since this is a Target Rifle you have to shoot the same brand of ammo to get consistence Dime size group. Used, it cost $399.99.
 

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I am a pistol guy. I have some shotguns, from folding stock former police models, an 870 express combo, to a Binelli Montefeltro. I have some 10/22's.

I have been using the 870 for deer hunting, and for the thick brush areas and relatively short shots that have been the norm for me it worked OK. But last year decided I should get a real rifle.

I liked the short barrel and adjustable LOP (I have short arms, and most stocks are a bit long for me). I liked the idea of the scout scope, though I have yet to get one. I have a Nikon Monarch on mine. It has been a good shooter, doing 1.5" groups at 100 yards with average ammo (which gave me more confidence for longer shots).

Last weekend I took a buck and a doe at 92 and 94 yards with it, punching heart shots in each.

Works for me !
 
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