Ruger Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks,

I got a Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle (Stainless, 16.1" barrel, .308 win, composite stock) for Christmas. Love the gun. surprisingly accurate. I bought it because I wanted a stainless compact bolt gun with the option to use iron sights. It was cheaper than buying an M77 Hawkeye compact and having a local smith install the sights...

I removed the scout rail and I would like to also remove the muzzle brake and replace it with the thread protector. The muzzle brake does a phenomenal job reducing felt recoil, but the muzzle blast seems pretty loud in this configuration.

If I remove the muzzle brake and replace it with the factory thread protector, should I keep the crush gasket in place for the thread protector (to prevent it from working itself loose) or do I keep the crush gasket/ring with the muzzle brake and only install the thread protector?

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,282 Posts
That's an excellent question that I would also like to know the answer to. I will give you a bump, and perhaps someone will know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's an excellent question that I would also like to know the answer to. I will give you a bump, and perhaps someone will know.
Hi ditto1958,

I posed this question on another forum. Apparently, the crush washer is only needed for flash hiders to ensure the orientation of the ports line up the way they are designed. The crush washer is not needed for a thread protector or even a the factory muzzle brake.

cynergyou
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
If you don't like the blast of the muzzle brake, and aren't trying to make the GSR as short as possible, just put a flash hider on it. Only reason people go without any thing on the muzzle and use a thread protector is they don't want the extra 2 inches of length of the flash hider.
Not sure why people buy a GSR then remove the Scout rail. Whatever floats your boat I guess.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Hi ditto1958,

I posed this question on another forum. Apparently, the crush washer is only needed for flash hiders to ensure the orientation of the ports line up the way they are designed. The crush washer is not needed for a thread protector or even a the factory muzzle brake.

cynergyou
If you are referring to the radial brake supplied with the new Ruger, it doesn't need a crush washer to index the exit ports, as it is a radial design.
With a radial style brake, the exit holes are not orientated. Simply pushes forward on the barrel to reduce recoil. Also kick up lots of dust if you are prone.
The birdcage flash hider provided on some models also does not require indexing.
It is only designed to disperse the muzzle flash to reduce flash blinding the shooter when shooting at night or in low light.
Direction of the flash dispersion in a flash hider is unimportant as long as it is not straight out front of the muzzle to cause temporary light blindness for follow up shots.
A crush washer is sometimes used with flash hiders and radial brakes to reduce the likelihood of loosening on the barrel. But not for indexing the openings.
A crush washer is however required when installing either a compensator or a side ported muzzle brake.
A compensator has top exiting ports that push down on the muzzle to counter muzzle jump.
A side ported brake has to also be indexed with a crush washer in order to index the ports to the side to reduce dust ups.
I use a stainless Fortis RED (Rapid Engagement Device) Hybrid Compensator/Brake, designed for rapid fire .308 on my 18" Stainless Gunsite.
I pre-crush the washer most of the way, so as to not over stress the threads on the barrel. Then do final 1/8 turn crush on the barrel with the device.
Best money spent so far.
Pretty much eliminates all muzzle jump and lessens the felt recoil to the point I can maintain visual thru my scout scope for both shot confirmation and/or rapid follow up shots.
There are many like it, but this one is mine.
2 cents. Or a nickel. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you are referring to the radial brake supplied with the new Ruger, it doesn't need a crush washer to index the exit ports, as it is a radial design.
With a radial style brake, the exit holes are not orientated. Simply pushes forward on the barrel to reduce recoil. Also kick up lots of dust if you are prone.
The birdcage flash hider provided on some models also does not require indexing.
It is only designed to disperse the muzzle flash to reduce flash blinding the shooter when shooting at night or in low light.
Direction of the flash dispersion in a flash hider is unimportant as long as it is not straight out front of the muzzle to cause temporary light blindness for follow up shots.
A crush washer is sometimes used with flash hiders and radial brakes to reduce the likelihood of loosening on the barrel. But not for indexing the openings.
A crush washer is however required when installing either a compensator or a side ported muzzle brake.
A compensator has top exiting ports that push down on the muzzle to counter muzzle jump.
A side ported brake has to also be indexed with a crush washer in order to index the ports to the side to reduce dust ups.
I use a stainless Fortis RED (Rapid Engagement Device) Hybrid Compensator/Brake, designed for rapid fire .308 on my 18" Stainless Gunsite.
I pre-crush the washer most of the way, so as to not over stress the threads on the barrel. Then do final 1/8 turn crush on the barrel with the device.
Best money spent so far.
Pretty much eliminates all muzzle jump and lessens the felt recoil to the point I can maintain visual thru my scout scope for both shot confirmation and/or rapid follow up shots.
There are many like it, but this one is mine.
2 cents. Or a nickel. :cool:
Thanks for the info Jim! I shot the gun with the thread protector installed and the felt recoil isn't bad at all. The thick rubber pad absorbs most of the energy. I think I will leave it in this config for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Thanks for the info Jim! I shot the gun with the thread protector installed and the felt recoil isn't bad at all. The thick rubber pad absorbs most of the energy. I think I will leave it in this config for now.
Was the reduction in muzzle blast / volume after removing the brake significant? I have the birdcage model and was thinking of swapping over to the brake.
 

·
One more gun
Joined
·
316 Posts
If you want a brake that doesn't have a lot of backblast, try the PWS FSC30. It works pretty good and looks nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I've just completed my RGS project..... on a rifle I bought in 2011. It's a 16" .308 version, left-handed.

Here's what it looked like in the beginning, with a Leupold 1.5-5x32 Scout scope (an SWFA exclusive at the time) mounted on the OEM rail:



My next modification was to try and suppress the rifle. This was more complicated than usual, because I needed it to accept the AAC 762-SDN-6 can that I already owned. The problem is that the matching flashhider for the can, when threaded on, is designed to come back over the barrel itself, covering about the first 1/2" of barrel aft of the shoulder. The RGS front sight band is located immediately aft of the thread shoulder, so the flashhider could not be threaded on. Solving the problem required machining a stainless steel bushing to fit inside the unthreaded portion of the flashhider, which would allow it to butt up against the thread shoulder, like it would on another rifle. Fortunately for me, my son is in the midst of taking a CNC manufacturing class at Lincoln Tech, so we mic'd out the dimensions, and he bought a piece of stainless steel bar stock from Amazon.com, which he machined in class, costing just a few pennies for the cost of the bushing. In this picture, you can see where the bushing ends inside the bore of the flashhider, and where the threads begin:



Next came threading the flashhider onto the muzzle. In this picture, you can see the bushing peeking out from under the flashhider, and how it butts up against the barrel shoulder:



The final change was in optics. The scout scope I had on it is a very nice scope. It's part of Leupold's VX-R firedot series, has nice clean glass (typical Leupold nice quality), and it works very well. The one drawback from a scout scope perspective is that, while it IS a long eye-relief scope, it doesn't have as much eye-relief as most other scout scopes, so as you can see in the first picture, it hangs out over the action. It's not really in the way, since the steel Ruger mags can't really be top loaded that way (the polymer mags on the other hand are excellent and can be top-loaded), but for the purists, it does somewhat violate Cooper's principles of what a scout rifle should be. The problem (for me) is that I have the old Mark 64 eyeballs with the aftermarket cataract options, particularly in my dominant left eye, and I can't see very clearly beyond 50 yards with lower magnifications anymore. So the next step was to swap out the OEM rail for an XS Sight Systems full length rail, and mount a traditional scope in the traditional position above the receiver. What the heck......I was already causing Col Cooper to spin in his grave with a scout scope obstructing the top-loading feature anyway, so in for a penny, in for a pound.

I am enamored of the Vortex Viper PST line of scopes, and I have a 4-16x50 FFP MRAD on a SCAR 17S I own, but (in my opinion) that would be too much scope for a handy rifle like the RGS. So I bought a 2.5-10x32 FFP MRAD Viper PST and mounted it in pair of medium height Burris XTR quick release rings. I wanted the QD feature to make the BUIS more accessible in the field, should that need ever arise. I would have preferred using the low height rings, but that would have set the scope tube literally in contact with the top of the rear ghost ring sight, so the scope is now mounted about a 1/4" higher than perfect. I'm headed to Elm Fork Shooting Range in Dallas this afternoon to zero the package, and if the height is a problem, I'll add a Karsten's cheek rest to the stock and call it good. Here is the finished product, including a Galco Ching Sling:





I own several nice rifles, including a 26" heavy-barreled precision Remington 700 .308 that will hit anything I can see through the 5-20x scope on it with a very high degree of accuracy (and weighs about a metric ton). I love that rifle, but this Ruger Gunsite Scout has just become my very favorite long gun, and it will occupy a place of honor in my collection as the official Truck Gun".

I know this was a long post to the original question, but the crux of it is to address another way to approach the question of muzzle-break/thread protector for the RGS.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top