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Good day,

I finally got some 22 lr and went to the range and shot about 288 rounds of lead round nose standard velocity out of my LCR, the gun functioned fine although as expected the cylinder was quite hot after a while so I couldn't hold it for long while reloading. but I gone thru that amount of ammo in a mere 1 hour or less (was shooting rapidly no breaks except to reload), then got home and as I was about to clean my revolver I noticed some kind of residue above my firearm's forcing cone, could the residues be lead or it's aluminum frame melted after that much heat? I can't brush this thing off with a nylon brush and I don't have a brass brush.
146672
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Corps Commander NGV
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6,284 Posts
I'm pretty sure your gun is fine. The high pressure gasses have probably removed the anodizing and etched the frame. The gun is now used, and is unlikely to change further. I am sure that you didn't melt the frame. The agency I work for hosts Citizen's Range Days and uses LCR 22's and LCR 38's to teach beginners. They get shot hot and heavy all day by lots of shooters. They have proven themselves durable revolvers.
 

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It's normal 22 residue and hot powder etching . Pick up a brass toothbrush and bore solvent , scrub it clean . Get a rod and bore brush and keep the bore and cylinders clean.
After all that shooting ...22's are notoriously filthy ... your gun can use a good cleaning and lubricating .
Be Safe,
Gary
 

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top strap flame etching, though that's the first I've heard with 22lr (but I don't get out much). Seen and heard it as pretty common in 357 magnum revolvers, supposedly worse if you use less than 158g bullets. Should be self-limiting and not a problem.
 

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Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
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Many people think: "Oh, it's just a 22 LR so it shouldn't be subject to flame cutting". Fact is, a 22 LR produces about 24k psi chamber pressure and uses fairly slow burning powder that burns just as hot as powder used in a centerfire cartridge. These same attributes are enough to cause flame cutting in a steel frame with center fire ammo so it is enough to cause top strap flame cutting on a 22 LR aluminum frame. At this point, it is just cosmetic and has no impact on the strength of the gun and probably never will. You can clean it but you can't remove it .... and it will continue to flame cut as more rounds are fired. My suggestion ..... don't bother cleaning the top strap beyond a normal cleaning routine. Shoot the gun and enjoy it for what it is.

FYI, I have a S&W Mod 17 (22 LR, steel frame) that shows almost no top strap flame cutting, despite the fact that it has fired at least 50 thousand rounds. Point being .... if you want a light weight gun, you have to put up with a few "wear" issues. If you want to avoid top strap flame cutting, go with a steel or stainless steel frame at at almnost 3 times the weight and a way higher price tag. Case in point, I have a stainless GP100 in 22 LR. I expect it will last a couple life times, but it cost me $300 more than a LCR. It's also a good boat anchor for a small boat at 42 ounces versus 15 ounces for an LCR.

Here's my GP100 22 LR:
 
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