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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a Ruger LCRx .22 magnum, 3 inch bbl. for my wife. Primary use will be home security. My wife is only 5 ft. tall, weighs 100 lbs. soaking wet and has very small hands and short fingers. Double action is too difficult for her little hands. Single action works great. The problem is she struggles to cock the hammer due to the heavy spring weight on the hammer. Is there a way to lighten the hammer pull weight without adversely affecting the operation of the gun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rimfire revolver springs need to be stout to reliably ignite the priming compound. If you search that gun you will find that is the main complaint. Maybe someone has a fix now.
Thank you. Maybe I'll get lucky and somebody on here will know what the fix is. I heard there is a company that makes specialty lighter springs but I don't know who they are.
 

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Lighter springs are almost certainly going to cause light strikes. There is no fix to this other than to shoot the gun and wear in the trigger. My wife has this gun, and she's no bigger than your wife, not to mention being 68 years old. She's gotten used to it. The only other real solution in revolvers is probably shooting .32 in the LCR .327 magnum, or that new Charter Arms .32 H&R. Assuming you can even find the gun or the ammo. If semi-autos are acceptable, the LCP II Lite Rack is very easy to shoot, but it's .22lr.
 

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I recently bought a Ruger LCRx .22 magnum, 3 inch bbl. for my wife. Primary use will be home security. My wife is only 5 ft. tall, weighs 100 lbs. soaking wet and has very small hands and short fingers. Double action is too difficult for her little hands. Single action works great. The problem is she struggles to cock the hammer due to the heavy spring weight on the hammer. Is there a way to lighten the hammer pull weight without adversely affecting the operation of the gun?
I have the same issue with my daughter and the short barrel WMR. All the testing with the review websites stated reliable ignition between 8-11lbs, I swapped out the hammer spring for a 9lb and experienced light strikes with CCI from Walmart so that cheaper ammo might have been the issue, I purchased premium ammo used in the video testing but have not tested it myself as of yet. It appears and I’m just speculating, that folks were using cheap ammo and complaining to Ruger. So from the time of release of the .22 variants Ruger kept increasing the hammer spring rate, mine came in around 14lb and I’ve read of higher rates. So you can drop the hammer spring rate but it’s going to take some testing with different ammo to get the ignition rate reliable.
153643
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lighter springs are almost certainly going to cause light strikes. There is no fix to this other than to shoot the gun and wear in the trigger. My wife has this gun, and she's no bigger than your wife, not to mention being 68 years old. She's gotten used to it. The only other real solution in revolvers is probably shooting .32 in the LCR .327 magnum, or that new Charter Arms .32 H&R. Assuming you can even find the gun or the ammo. If semi-autos are acceptable, the LCP II Lite Rack is very easy to shoot, but it's .22lr.
Thank you. My wife is 65 so there's not much difference. I'll have to work on this gun to get it working to her satisfaction. She would not appreciate it much if I were to buy yet another gun. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have the same issue with my daughter and the short barrel WMR. All the testing with the review websites stated reliable ignition between 8-11lbs, I swapped out the hammer spring for a 9lb and experienced light strikes with CCI from Walmart so that cheaper ammo might have been the issue, I purchased premium ammo used in the video testing but have not tested it myself as of yet. It appears and I’m just speculating, that folks were using cheap ammo and complaining to Ruger. So from the time of release of the .22 variants Ruger kept increasing the hammer spring rate, mine came in around 14lb and I’ve read of higher rates. So you can drop the hammer spring rate but it’s going to take some testing with different ammo to get the ignition rate reliable. View attachment 153643
Thank you. I just shoot 'em and don't take them apart. I would let that up to a real gunsmith. With the scarce ammo problem right now, is is very difficult to find any ammo let alone find a variety to test. Maybe that situation will ease in the near future. It would be nice if Ruger would offer a reduced rate spring kit. Even a 20% reduction in spring resistance would be a great help and, as you suggest, with the use of better quality ammo I doubt there would be a problem with light strike induced misfires, but that's just my unqualified opinion.
 

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Thank you. I just shoot 'em and don't take them apart. I would let that up to a real gunsmith. With the scarce ammo problem right now, is is very difficult to find any ammo let alone find a variety to test. Maybe that situation will ease in the near future. It would be nice if Ruger would offer a reduced rate spring kit. Even a 20% reduction in spring resistance would be a great help and, as you suggest, with the use of better quality ammo I doubt there would be a problem with light strike induced misfires, but that's just my unqualified opinion.
I understand, the LCRs are just little puzzles so there’s not much to disassemble and reassemble. I think most of the spring rates these days have more to go do with lawyers than ignition rates. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I understand, the LCRs are just little puzzles so there’s not much to disassemble and reassemble. I think most of the spring rates these days have more to go do with lawyers than ignition rates. :)
Maybe, if I change the grips on it, I will look closer at how it's made. In the meantime, I'll stick with the old saying from Clint Eastwood - "A man has to know his limitations." You're probably right about the lawyer thing. It's a shame our society is like that. Actually, I don't think Ruger got this gun wrong or made a mistake, they just didn't "get it right". Other than the spring rate, it seems to be a fine piece.
 

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I have a LCR22WMR that has a stiff trigger. It does get lighter after use. My 73 year old wife shoots it quite a bit. She has gotten a little stronger too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a LCR22WMR that has a stiff trigger. It does get lighter after use. My 73 year old wife shoots it quite a bit. She has gotten a little stronger too.
Yes, that trigger is really stiff. That is why I went with the LCRx. When shooting single action the trigger pull isn't too bad. My wife's problem is her struggle with being able to cock the hammer. So far, from the advice I've received from the gracious people on this blog, about all that can be done is continue using the gun, occasionally apply a drop of oil (as directed in the manual) and after several hundred rounds it should smooth out and be a bit easier to operate. Apparently changing springs isn't a good idea due to the force needed for the firing pin to strike the primer edge of the ammo. Except for that one issue, it seems like a really nice gun.
 

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Maybe, if I change the grips on it, I will look closer at how it's made. In the meantime, I'll stick with the old saying from Clint Eastwood - "A man has to know his limitations." You're probably right about the lawyer thing. It's a shame our society is like that. Actually, I don't think Ruger got this gun wrong or made a mistake, they just didn't "get it right". Other than the spring rate, it seems to be a fine piece.
Here’s a little video on the puzzle. :) I ordered a set of springs from Wolfe Gunsprings, I didn’t alter the original as in this video.

 

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I haven't handled an LCRx, so I don't really know how hard it is to cock the hammer. But I do have an H&R convertible.



It's been very reliable igniting both LR and WMR ammo, and I don't consider it particularly tough to cock. So I can't imagine any legitimate reason the LCRx should be in order to function. That said, I would first suspect friction as the culprit. My Mark 3 was pretty hard to cock when I bought it (NIB). Cleaning and lubing only helped a little, and use made cocking smoother but not really easier. After going thru every part and smoothing/polishing every place that moved against other parts, cocking it is ridiculously easy. When clean, you'd swear I forgot to install the hammer if I let you cock it. No springs changed at all.

Just a little different take.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Here’s a little video on the puzzle. :) I ordered a set of springs from Wolfe Gunsprings, I didn’t alter the original as in this video.

Thank you for sending the video. He makes it look easy enough. I checked the Gunsprings.com (Wolff) site but they only advertise springs for the larger calibers. Didn't see any listed for the LCRx .22 WMR. I do believe that taking that spring down to 11 lbs. would be a great fix to the heavy hammer/trigger pull issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I haven't handled an LCRx, so I don't really know how hard it is to cock the hammer. But I do have an H&R convertible.



It's been very reliable igniting both LR and WMR ammo, and I don't consider it particularly tough to cock. So I can't imagine any legitimate reason the LCRx should be in order to function. That said, I would first suspect friction as the culprit. My Mark 3 was pretty hard to cock when I bought it (NIB). Cleaning and lubing only helped a little, and use made cocking smoother but not really easier. After going thru every part and smoothing/polishing every place that moved against other parts, cocking it is ridiculously easy. When clean, you'd swear I forgot to install the hammer if I let you cock it. No springs changed at all.

Just a little different take.
Sounds like good information. I always liked H&R guns. Used to own one then traded it in on a Ruger Single Six with the interchangable cylinders. It's pretty nice and I never had a problem with it. The LCRx is very stiff. I understand factory specs for the hammer is 11 to 14 pounds and 15 to 18 for the trigger in double action mode. I'm sure polishing everything would help but from what others have noted, the action will smooth out but still be stiff. I'll do what I can but I think it's a condition we'll have to live with unless Ruger would come out with an authorized set of reduced rate springs, which is probably unlikely. Thanks for the input.
 

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Thank you for sending the video. He makes it look easy enough. I checked the Gunsprings.com (Wolff) site but they only advertise springs for the larger calibers. Didn't see any listed for the LCRx .22 WMR. I do believe that taking that spring down to 11 lbs. would be a great fix to the heavy hammer/trigger pull issue.
The springs are the same, just different rates. My guess the techs just haven’t tested the rimfires. Jeff Quinn from Gunblast posted this data from his review. 8.14lb was the spring rate at the time of his review.


Here’s the video review..

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The springs are the same, just different rates. My guess the techs just haven’t tested the rimfires. Jeff Quinn from Gunblast posted this data from his review. 8.14lb was the spring rate at the time of his review.


Here’s the video review..

Thanks for that bit of information. Didn't know the spring sets would be the same as the larger calibers. Very informative video, also found another one by a guy named Buffalo that does a really good, objective evaluation of the gun. I like it and I may try one of those other spring sets real soon.
 

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Thanks for that bit of information. Didn't know the spring sets would be the same as the larger calibers. Very informative video, also found another one by a guy named Buffalo that does a really good, objective evaluation of the gun. I like it and I may try one of those other spring sets real soon.
I like the LCR platform, haven’t had an issue and I think it’s just an ammo deal as I’m in the window of other similar test.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The springs are the same, just different rates. My guess the techs just haven’t tested the rimfires. Jeff Quinn from Gunblast posted this data from his review. 8.14lb was the spring rate at the time of his review.


Here’s the video review..

Hey, just wanted to get back to you re: hammer spring tension on the LCRx .22 mag. I contacted Wolff and they said they didn't have a lighter spring for the LCRx .22 mag. so, I ordered the 9 pound one they have listed for the .38/.357 anyway. It took several weeks to arrive but I finally received it and had a gunsmith do the change-out. Seems to work just fine and my wife can now shoot it both SA and DA. Her face lit up the first time she dry fired it. Thanks again for the info.
 

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That’s Awesome! It makes a big difference in the balance of the firearm. Hope she shoot’s the dickens out of that thing! 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻
 
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