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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at one of these in 6.5 Creedmoor as a long range rifle (sold my Remington XR-100 yesterday) and I was wondering if anyone here has any experience with one. I have considered the RPR but they are still hard to find in 6.5 for reasonable money and I have read that there are issues at any rate. A friend bought the Savage Model 12 LRP and it's a real shooter, but I prefer the Ruger action if it is feasible.
 

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I know that I'll get flamed to no end for being honest and objective here, but I wouldn't recommend the Ruger M77MkII Target for long range precision shooting. I've owned 4 of them, and a lot of M77's - LOVE the action - but I just can't recommend the Target model.

I would not consider the RPR and the Ruger M77MkII Target to be "Ruger Actions," since thy are starkly different from one another. Both have Ruger phoenix on the side, but the two definitely are more different from one another that they might as well be different brands.

The RPR, by design, has more going for it to be a long range rifle than the Ruger M77MkII Target ever had. I have no use for an RPR, and love the M77MkII action, but I would never again try to use a M77MkII for long range. It's far too easy to buy or build a Remington or Savage that will out perform the Ruger action. They're great hunting rifles, but not great long range rifles.

The Savage 12 is a fantastic rifle. I have owned several, most of which have shot 1/4-1/3MOA out of the box - one of which that would shoot under .2MOA regularly until the barrel started giving up, it's still a 1/2MOA rifle today with over 3,000rnds down that barrel. The Savage 12 is the only factory rifle that has ever made me feel foolish for spending so much money on custom precision rifles, as I have spent 3-5x as much on customs that only slightly out performed these factory models. The Rem 700 is also a well proven platform to build from. A guy can put under $800 into a complete Remington 700 build and have a 1/2-3/4MOA rifle.

At a minimum, the M77MkII Target needs blocked and bedded, the lugs trued and lapped, and to have the free float corrected (I've owned 3, none were factory free floated). This isn't cost prohibitive, but I've never had a Ruger M77MkII, out of over 40 of them that I've owned - including 4 of the target models - that shot better than 3/4MOA without this work done, and most of them don't shoot under 1MOA out of the box. The adjustable 2 stage trigger is a massive step up from the standard trigger, but it's still not as good as a Jard or Timney aftermarket trigger. The bolt play is reliable, but it's not great for precision work. The Target stock isn't a great bench profile, it's a kinda weird round belly beaver tail style forend, it sits fairly well on a rolled up coat, decent on sandbags, but it's not great for mounting a bipod nor for a machine rest.

I LOVE the M77MkII action, so much that I'm probably one of the few folks that selectively enjoys building custom rifles on the platform (have 4 in progress right now, in fact), but it is what it is - a hunting action.
 

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Interesting. My V/T in .204 has the barrel floated from the factory, hasn't had any lapping or bedding and still shoots 1/2 to 1/4 moa.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback guys. I won't mind having one that I have to tinker with a bit, I enjoy the tinkering at least as much as the shooting, so I went ahead and ordered it. I'll probably never own another new Remington rifle, quality has just dropped off too much. I heavily considered the Savage, it is undeniably the most consistent shooter in the class, but it is garishly ugly, and I just don't think I would ever be able to fall in love with it like I do my Rugers.


XR-100 is on my short list of must haves
Mine was an excellent shooter, dime sized groups could be shot regularly with standard Hornady ammo. My chief complaints are the thumbhole stock, which was slightly too large for my fat stubby fingers to get on the trigger quite enough, and the finish quality, which wasn't very robust, but most modern non-stainless Remingtons I've seen suffer from this issue.
 

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There is NO comparison in the Ruger and the Savage LPR. While they may cost close to the same, the Ruger won't hold a candle to the Savage at the range, in terms of accuracy. Either out of the box, or with some mods done to each.

You buy a Ruger bolt gun, because you like Rugers and that's what you want. You DON'T buy it for maximum accuracy for the dollar spent, because that's not what you get.

And I am not saying they don't exist..........but an untouched, factory Ruger rifle, that consistently shoots 1/4 MOA...........well, call me VERY skeptical. I have had a BUNCH of Rugers over the years and NEVER had one remotely even close to being a 1/4moa rifle in factory trim. Just the trigger alone would be enough to keep that from happeneing. Or some are way better than me with creeping, heavy triggers on target rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There is NO comparison in the Ruger and the Savage LPR. While they may cost close to the same, the Ruger won't hold a candle to the Savage at the range, in terms of accuracy. Either out of the box, or with some mods done to each.

You buy a Ruger bolt gun, because you like Rugers and that's what you want. You DON'T buy it for maximum accuracy for the dollar spent, because that's not what you get.

And I am not saying they don't exist..........but an untouched, factory Ruger rifle, that consistently shoots 1/4 MOA...........well, call me VERY skeptical. I have had a BUNCH of Rugers over the years and NEVER had one remotely even close to being a 1/4moa rifle in factory trim. Just the trigger alone would be enough to keep that from happeneing. Or some are way better than me with creeping, heavy triggers on target rifles.
I agree, the Savage is certainly the accuracy king. But let's be honest, I'm not competing in long range shooting matches here. I'm playing. If I snag one that will lay down .75 MOA, I'll be perfectly fine with that, and any creature that walks into my crosshairs will never know the difference. If it shoots better than that, it'll just be icing on the cake. I never have been a group chaser like some guys are. I like my rifles accurate, but I'm not heartbroken if they don't shoot .10 inch groups at 100 yards either. It kind of loses it's enjoyment when you get that intense about it.
 

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There is NO comparison in the Ruger and the Savage LPR. While they may cost close to the same, the Ruger won't hold a candle to the Savage at the range, in terms of accuracy. Either out of the box, or with some mods done to each.

You buy a Ruger bolt gun, because you like Rugers and that's what you want. You DON'T buy it for maximum accuracy for the dollar spent, because that's not what you get.

And I am not saying they don't exist..........but an untouched, factory Ruger rifle, that consistently shoots 1/4 MOA...........well, call me VERY skeptical. I have had a BUNCH of Rugers over the years and NEVER had one remotely even close to being a 1/4moa rifle in factory trim. Just the trigger alone would be enough to keep that from happeneing. Or some are way better than me with creeping, heavy triggers on target rifles.
Gee, you guys are tough and demanding. All I ask of any rifle I own that is not intended for benchrest competition is consistent sub-1/2 MOA. With my hand loads I get that with both of my two Rugers, that is my M77 Hawkeye in 204 Ruger and my No. 1V in 222 Rem. While my No. 1 is a custom job, my Hawkeye is completely original. as it came from the factory.
 

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The only thing I've done to my V\T is adjust the trigger. It has a nice consistent 2lb trigger pull.
Last time I did some serious shooting I got a nice .220 5 shot group laying prone.
Seems there are a lot of Savage lovers on this forum that discount any thing Ruger.
 

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Seems there are a lot of Savage lovers on this forum that discount any thing Ruger.
After this comment, I'd like to clear the air and be sure to point out that I'm a HUGE fan of the Ruger M77 MkII/Hawkeye action. I do most of my hunting with Ruger M77's. A Ruger M77 MkII in .30-06 was my first deer rifle of my own as a kid, and I'm currently rebuilding it to pass it on to my son (blueprinting, shilen barrel, custom exhibition grade walnut stock, new scope...). I've owned a couple dozen Ruger M77's since then, including building 2 for benchrest and F-class competition. I'm also in process building 3 other custom Ruger M77's, two Hawkeyes in 7mm and 300win mag, and a Mark II Compact in either 7-08 or 284win (started life as a 243win) - however these 3 will be hunting rifles, not long range, precision competition style rifles.

I've done incredibly well with Savage FACTORY rifles, and have done even better with custom built Savage RBDP Target actions and Stryker's. The greatest accuracy I've ever attained has been with pure custom Stolle Panda's (now Kelby's), but I've had blue printed Rem 700's do incredibly well also. I'm a bigger fan of Remington 700's than Savages, and have built far more Rem's than any other model (except AR's, of course).

As I mentioned, I've also built custom benchrest competition Ruger M77MkII's. The investment to get them to shoot as well is higher. They're a hunting action, 100% reliable and sure functioning, but that comes at the cost of looser tolerances compared to precision rigs.

When someone talks about a heavy barreled "varmint/Target" model and long range shooting, usually that implies the expectation for extreme precision. Obviously there are specimen out there that leave Ruger's factory at 1/4MOA, but I've never found one. It's easier to find a Rem or Savage that shoots better out of the box, and easier to upgrade either to improve precision even further than it is for Ruger M77's.
 

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I have 2-6.5's, one in the RPR, one in the M77 target model. Love them both. Both will shoot <.5 all day. Put on some decent glass and enjoy.
 

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Mark II Varmint

I have a Mark II in 223. Bought new in 1996,came free floated from the factory, 2.5 lb. trigger. Have never adjusted trigger, and never taken out of stock, shoots in the 3's consistently. Also have 2 Rem VS-SF's, and the Ruger shoots as well as the Remingtons. I know nothing about a 6.5, but the triggers on the new Remingtons are terrible, and the safety the old were dangerous. I have one Savage, it shoots great, but is hard to look at. Everyone thinks differently, and that's whats interesting.
 

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Congrats! Nice rifle!
 

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I have a Mark II in 223. Bought new in 1996,came free floated from the factory, 2.5 lb. trigger. Have never adjusted trigger, and never taken out of stock, shoots in the 3's consistently. Also have 2 Rem VS-SF's, and the Ruger shoots as well as the Remingtons. I know nothing about a 6.5, but the triggers on the new Remingtons are terrible, and the safety the old were dangerous. I have one Savage, it shoots great, but is hard to look at. Everyone thinks differently, and that's whats interesting.
You know, this would all be a lot less stressful if the companies who make rifle would just ship them with no obvious built in flaws. I have not bought a single NIB rifle in memory that did not need (and I do mean need) a bit of gunsmithing or replacement of original parts with aftermarket parts, to solve some obvious deficiency or other.

I have paid over $1200 several times in the past few years to receive rifles that needed a new trigger, had poorly fitting magazines that caused jamming, and other such quality control issues. I am not talking about a Jennings pistol, I am referring to Ruger, Remington Savage and CZ rifles.

These days, when I buy a new Ruger or a CZ, I assume the trigger will need modification or replacing. I assume the box magazines on any new rifle will need modification to fit properly.

The only rifle I have bought in the past decade that came with no flaws is a $3000 BAT action rifle that was built by Russ Haydon (Russ Haydon Shooter Supply) with all parts hand picked by me.
 

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When I bought my M77- Mark II Target in 308 Win. It was the year that they changed from the blued receiver to all Stainless and changed the name from Varmint to Target. It was advertised as a 1MOA rifle with a free floated barrel and a match quality adjustable trigger. At around $600 I feel That I got what I paid for. I put a Leupold VX3 Target scope that cost a tad more than The rifle and never looked back. Is it the most accurate rifle of it's kind? Heck No!! To get the kind of precision that some here are expecting you'd have to spend a lot more than what it cost and there are a lot of rifles that are more precise. But for me it's reliable and accurate enough for my needs which is punching paper at 100 to 200 yards. Anything more would be like driving a Ferrari in a parking lot. I feel that I got my money's worth in the over 20 years I've owned and shot it. So, if you're going to actually use it to compete at long range I'd say look at something else, because it is what it is. At best a 1MOA rifle.

PS. Mine ain't for sale and never will be. Also it's got a sweet trigger that I've never adjusted since I unpacked it and it shoots better than I am capable of.
 

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My M-77 MkII in stainless goes back to 1990/91 I have never touched it mechanically except to add the glass. It's dead nuts on at 200 yards. Gets a little shaky after that because of age.

Will never sell it. Never.
 
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