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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've never owned a Ruger before this one but I've heard a lot of horror stories about stripping them. My question is what sorts of cleaning supplies and oils/lubricants do I need for this gun? I've noticed the bolt gets kind of sticky after a handful of clips, is there a grease I can get that will last a little longer? I've just been using the Klean Bore gun cleaning/lubricating oil that came in my kit.
 

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I don't field strip them very often. I do simple cleaning like spray the barrel with bore cleaner
and pass a brush thru it. I also spray the chamber(open) and use a small rug or q-tips to wipe.
I will spray rem oil thru the bolt mechanism. I only field strip once a year...
 

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I've always used carb cleaner with a pull thru for the bore and a small tooth brush or other suitable brush to clean the bolt/chamber and everything else which is accessible. Everything then get a bit of CorrosionX or BreakFree. I like to use compressed air as a tool to get everything clean and lubricated. That's pretty much the procedure for all my rimfires... long and short.

Grease has a tendency to attract lots of destructive dirt.

SD
 

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When i had a mkII, i used Hornady gun cleaner/dry lube. The dry lube tended to not build gunk.
 

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I only had trouble the first time field striping mine now its a cinch to do.
 

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You may be using too much lube. These guns like to run almost dry. Just a drop or two on the bolt is more than sufficient. Too much lube is a real problem in these guns. Blowbacks in general tend to be dirty. Also, some ammo tends to be dirtier than others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
quote:Originally posted by Song Dawg


Grease has a tendency to attract lots of destructive dirt.

SD
I see what you mean now. After putting about 350 rounds through this gun there is a lot of gunk build-up inside there. I'll need to strip it now so I can clean it thoroughly.
 

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I like to add a few drops of oil to a clean rag and then wipe the bolt down with that rag. This keeps too much lubricant off the moving parts and from gathering any blowback residue. A lot less of a mess and will extend the pistol's functioning time between cleanings.

R,
Bullseye
 

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quote:Originally posted by Bullseye

I like to add a few drops of oil to a clean rag and then wipe the bolt down with that rag. This keeps too much lubricant off the moving parts and from gathering any blowback residue. A lot less of a mess and will extend the pistol's functioning time between cleanings.

R,
Bullseye
When it comes to the Ruger MK's I've come to have tremendous respect and appreciation for Bullseye's knowledge and willness to help.
Thanks Bullseye!

SD
 

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quote:Originally posted by Song Dawg


When it comes to the Ruger MK's I've come to have tremendous respect and appreciation for Bullseye's knowledge and willness to help.
Thanks Bullseye!

SD
Thanks for the kind words SD. I've always been into helping get folks interested in shooting sports and this is just one of the ways I try to help. Many folks have Rugers 22 Autos, many are frustrated by them, so if I can help them through that, they'll be lots more happy shooters out on the range. I just happen to know a little bit about these Rugers and I'm not shy about sharing.

R,
Bullseye
 

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David The Gnome, As far as "horror stories" go about disassembling firearms, let me put "you" at rest. Horror stories come from the uninitiated, clutses, & the impatient, period! Let me say for the "record" that in 40 + years of gunsmithing both part and full time, I have "yet" to come upon the firearm I could not disassemble and reassemble. Am I "smarter" than everyone else? Of course not! I simply employ a method taught to me by an old timer gunsmith when I first started out. No.1: Study the engineering of the gun you have in your hand. You can do this through schematics or when not available, taking the gun out of the stock or the grips and or side plates off when accessible. Functioning the gun through it's cycle. No.2: Look at "all" the pins and screws in the gun and determine from the position of parts, (hammer, trigger, sear, etc.) what screw or pin "holds" what part. No.3: Through the "previous" study of parts alignment and how the parts interact with one another, determine what part or parts are "spring" loaded. No.4: Form a "plan" of action for taking parts out and have a box with numbered bins to take out and place in order each part. No.5: Normally, The parts or assemblies that have the "heaviest" spring loading will be somewhere at the "beginning" of disassembly. That's pretty much the method I have utilized over the years. I'm not saying the "gun" is not out there that I can't take apart, only that "I" havn't come across it yet! There are some very excellent takedown books available now that were not available back in the old days when I started out. "All" of the disassembly books by J.B. Wood are "excellent". The NRA disassembly books also are a "must have". David Chicoine's book on Antique Firearms Disassembly is "excellent". Exploded Views by Karns & Traister another good one. Gun Drawings by Murtz and the Gun Parts Corporation Manual also great. Brownell's Encyclopedia Of Modern Firearms Parts another. Hope this helps out the "fraternity" in some way.............Dick;)
 

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I think that some of us can get in over our heads from time to time. Always been easier to tear something apart than put it back together.
The absolute worst nightmare i had been into on tearing a gun apart was replacing a transfer bar on a H&R single shot 12 ga.
Learned real quick i was over my head!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Off to a gunsmith with that one!
 

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quote:Originally posted by deputy125

I think that some of us can get in over our heads from time to time. Always been easier to tear something apart than put it back together.
The absolute worst nightmare i had been into on tearing a gun apart was replacing a transfer bar on a H&R single shot 12 ga.
Learned real quick i was over my head!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Off to a gunsmith with that one!
deputy125, Just a little "note" on those H&R single shots. Your talking about the Striker & Lifter assembley. The sriker (transfer bar) is made out of cheap cast pot metal. After replacing a bunch of them with factory replacements, I decided to "smarten" up and started making strikers out of good quality "tool steel". Much better quality and very easily made. Never had one of the "steel" one's come back..............Dick[8D]
 
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