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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I took my Ruger Mark III out for the first time the other night and found it very difficult to line up the sights in an indoor range. I found it very tiring on the eyes but I guess this will get easier.

I am just wondering what sight picture I should be using on my Mark III Target? The manual shows what I believe #1 but I want to be sure.



Thank You
T
 

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I have a hunter model and hate the fiber front sight, put a scope on it if I was going to shoot open sights I would use 2
 

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#1 is considered correct traditional target, #2 is combat where your goal is center of mass hits and #3 is a compensatory sight picture.
 

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If the sights are hard to see and you might want to try a red dot ?
Welcome to the Forum, the red dots are real easy to see indoors and out.
 

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sight picture

Number 1, the "six o'clock" hold is standard for bullseye. And for us old farts it helps us see the whole target, so we can spray all over the paper:D
 

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I have always used #2, but with my aging eyes, I find it increasingly difficult to shoot acurately with open sites. I just installed a red dot on my 22/45, and have scopes on all but one of my target guns.
 

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As mentioned, #1 is correct for traditional bullseye target work, since it allows a more precise hold on the bull. #2, though, is what most folks use for field work on targets of varying sizes and varying distances.

Pretty tough to focus sharply on both rear and front sights, but the front is the most important of the two to keep sharp. As also mentioned, with age it becomes difficult to focus even on the front sight. A red dot will be much more comfortable to shoot and easier to use. For most folks, it will tighten up group size.

I'm now at an age where I must use a red dot or scope to shoot the way I'm capable of shooting. My iron sight days are over.
 

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sight picture

As mentioned, #1 is correct for traditional bullseye target work, since it allows a more precise hold on the bull. #2, though, is what most folks use for field work on targets of varying sizes and varying distances.

Pretty tough to focus sharply on both rear and front sights, but the front is the most important of the two to keep sharp. As also mentioned, with age it becomes difficult to focus even on the front sight. A red dot will be much more comfortable to shoot and easier to use. For most folks, it will tighten up group size.

I'm now at an age where I must use a red dot or scope to shoot the way I'm capable of shooting. My iron sight days are over.
My iron sight days are probably over also, but I think I'm in age denial.:D:D
 

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I still have three handguns with iron sites. Two of them are SD weapons, and while they need to be accurate, dime sized groups aren't necessary for them.
 

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it took me a couple of trips to the range and some unloaded aim and sight practice at home to get used to sighting in using the iron sights - I tend to focus on the sights at first with target unfocussed in the background - then shift to target in focus while firing with the front sight nearly in focus and the rear sights pretty blurred - then full on the target to see where there new hole is - then start again for next shot.

Or at least that is what i am doing when I think about it.

I did add a laser designator, primarily for the wife (bi-focals might be messing her up), but only used it once so far and have done some adjustments on it - will likely be using it tomorrow.
 
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