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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a Ruger Redhawk from 1982. One evening when I handled it, I discovered something that looks like a small pit in front of the trigger guard (see image).
Is it from the casting process? Is it normal for a Redhawk to have a few of these?
Also, I think the gun is fine. The issue is only cosmetic, but it bothers me because the previous owner polished the gun (which makes you see it better) and because it is the thing like that that I can find.
I tried to contact the importer of Ruger in my country, but I doubt I will hear from them because I didn't buy the gun at a gunstore.
Is there a way to get rid of the pit?
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If it were mine, I would try to find find steel or silver colored or clear epoxy and put a small drop into the hole then polish away the excess with fine steel wool. I would try to go in the same direction as any polishing marks on the frame. You might see the filled hole, but others probably will not. Good luck with this. That is a fine revolver and I once had one like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes you sometimes see that in a Ruger. There are a lot of investment castings in Ruger products so a tiny void can happen. It looks more like a casting flaw than a rust pit to me.
Yeah well, that sucks. I don't know, I guess it's an OCD thing.
Now I'm torn between trying to ignore it or bringing it to a gunsmith (but I guess the cost isn't worth it). What would you do? Did something similar happen to you?
 

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Pits occur in castings, they also occur in forgings. I have a Single Six with a pit, worse than that I have a Colt SAA with a pit
I bought both new so they came from the factory that way. I bought both to shoot but now (40 years later) I wish I had not bought the Colt.
 

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I would be more inclined to simply ignore it. But if that’s not possible a bead blasted finish would disguise it better.

A few years back I bought a pitted GP100 cheap and did a bunch of modifications to it including a bead blasted finish. The finish does a pretty good job of hiding the pits but if you look closely you can see some. Most who see it and handle it never notice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Pits occur in castings, they also occur in forgings. I have a Single Six with a pit, worse than that I have a Colt SAA with a pit
I bought both new so they came from the factory that way. I bought both to shoot but now (40 years later) I wish I had not bought the Colt.
did you do something about it?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I would be more inclined to simply ignore it. But if that’s not possible a bead blasted finish would disguise it better.

A few years back I bought a pitted GP100 cheap and did a bunch of modifications to it including a bead blasted finish. The finish does a pretty good job of hiding the pits but if you look closely you can see some. Most who see it and handle it never notice.
I thought about getting it bead blasted but i guess i'll just live with it. Other than this minor little flaw the gun is beautiful. the gun also has some other knicks and dings from the factory, but they're less noticable because they aren't black
 
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