Ruger Forum banner

21 - 40 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Update on my new Sec9. I got finally found ammo and put 70 rnds through it (magtech and remington 115). I left the ammo in the mags to break them in. Cleaned and lubed the weapon before I went. 1st 2 rounds FTL nose up. Next 68 worked like a charm and then reloaded those 2 rounds and no issues. I think that it is just a break in thing, I will update at 500 rnds through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
The ejector in mine is straight. Gun works perfectly. Bought it about a year ago.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
For all new firearm owners here. When it comes to "break in", there are 2 things to consider.
1. Assembly line guns are built to tolerance and then the parts are randomly thrown together. That being the case, an individual firearm will sometimes have parts that don't mate well. Putting a couple of hundred live rounds through the gun will often allow the parts to wear away at each other until they do mate well. By 500 rounds, any mating issues should be solved.
2. Springs are also made to tolerances. They have to be strong enough to do the job over a set period of uses. Because of that, they tend to leave the factory stronger than they need to be. Springs will begin to wear from the first use on. Most notorious (from Ruger) are mag springs. They tend to be difficult to load to full capacity, and can put a certain amount of strain on the process of leaving the mag, robbing some of the momentum needed to fully chamber the round. I say this because 2 people in this thread have mentioned the first 2 rounds having problems, but not the rest of the mag. For this reason, I typically do not load a magazine to capacity during the break in period except occasionally to test it.

One more thing on the first round loading well. Lock your slide back, insert a magazine, pull the slide back and LET GO! Many new shooters have a tendency to want to ride the slide when loading that first round. Don't! Let the gun do what it is designed to do.

One more more thing. Welcome to the sport and the forum. Feel free to ask questions here. There are a lot of smart and experienced shooters here that like to help those who need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
For all new firearm owners here. When it comes to "break in", there are 2 things to consider.
1. Assembly line guns are built to tolerance and then the parts are randomly thrown together. That being the case, an individual firearm will sometimes have parts that don't mate well. Putting a couple of hundred live rounds through the gun will often allow the parts to wear away at each other until they do mate well. By 500 rounds, any mating issues should be solved.
2. Springs are also made to tolerances. They have to be strong enough to do the job over a set period of uses. Because of that, they tend to leave the factory stronger than they need to be. Springs will begin to wear from the first use on. Most notorious (from Ruger) are mag springs. They tend to be difficult to load to full capacity, and can put a certain amount of strain on the process of leaving the mag, robbing some of the momentum needed to fully chamber the round. I say this because 2 people in this thread have mentioned the first 2 rounds having problems, but not the rest of the mag. For this reason, I typically do not load a magazine to capacity during the break in period except occasionally to test it.

One more thing on the first round loading well. Lock your slide back, insert a magazine, pull the slide back and LET GO! Many new shooters have a tendency to want to ride the slide when loading that first round. Don't! Let the gun do what it is designed to do.

One more more thing. Welcome to the sport and the forum. Feel free to ask questions here. There are a lot of smart and experienced shooters here that like to help those who need it.
Excellent advice with a great explanation as to why. Thank you for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
An update on this: kept getting the same issues (round not fully chambering and slide locking back with rounds still in mag). It seems like it has improved after about 300 rounds. I just shot 50 Fiocchi 115gr (1 slide lock back with mag still loaded) and 50 blazer 115gr (no malfunctions).

Really hoping this issue is sorting itself out. I’m at about 400 rounds in now. If I get to 500 and I’m still having issues I’ll reach out to Ruger again. Hope I’m not jinxing myself right now but it looks like all I needed to do was “break in” my Security 9.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
1 malfunction in 100 rounds is definitely better; 99% success. Hopefully, this continues to get better.

Not sure if this has been asked, but has someone else shot the pistol?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
1 malfunction in 100 rounds is definitely better; 99% success. Hopefully, this continues to get better.

Not sure if this has been asked, but has someone else shot the pistol?
So far a cousin, a friend, and myself. My cousin went out with me this last time and he didn’t have any issues. There was only the 1 instance that the slide locked back on me that time. Before that a friend went with me and he had a couple issues, one where the round didn’t fully chamber and the other was a light strike which I was having too. (This has only happened with a box of Sellier and Bellot 124gr)

I started wondering if maybe I was inadvertently hitting the slide lock with my grip or something. I hadn’t noticed it or anything, but I’m going to pay special attention to that next time I go out. When I’ve had the most malfunctions has been with Federal Champion 115gr and Browning 115gr which were both pretty cheap (like $40 for a box of 200 and 250 respectively)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I stopped the problem by using 124gr ammo. After a few hundred rounds, I could run 115gr again.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
You may be on to something here. The malfunctions have slowly been decreasing after I shot 50 Sellier and Bellot 124gr. It’s been the only 124gr I’ve been able to find with these crazy times. Wouldn’t buy it again though - I had several light strikes with that box of 50 which hasn’t happened with any other ammo brand.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just bought the security 9 as well. I cleaned and oiled it first thing. I took it to the range today and put 100 rounds through it.

Failure to feed nose up happened about 10 times. I was using lawman 147 grain. I had to drop the mag to eject and chamber a new round. If I didn't drop the mag it would eject the failed cartridge and the next one would fail as well.

It was pretty disappointing I must say but I did like the pistol a lot outside of that. Two of my relatives fired the gun as well, they also got the failure to feed nose up. They thought the gun just needed to be broken in but it seemed to be failing quite a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I have two of these pistols and both also would stop short of going fully into battery.
I saw this review on the basspro website. You have to scroll down through some reviews before you'll find it:

"The Security 9 can be a good pistol, but you’ll need to invest to time and energy into making it one. When I brought my newly purchased gun to the range, it jammed with every shot. It would eject the case just fine, but the new cartridge would jam in the breach. I would clear the jam and try again, and again the same thing happened. Over and over, the gun just refused to feed. Back at home, with the gun disassembled on my work bench, I inspected everything closely under a magnifying lamp. The problem, problems rather, were immediately apparent. The face of the bolt, as well as the feed ramp, were rough and unfinished surfaces. I suspect they were straight from the casting molds, because the metal on these two critical surfaces was black, rough to the touch and showed no signs of grinding or machining. It’s pretty obvious why the feed ramp needs to be a smooth, polished surface. The nose of the bullet must slide over and through this concave surface to enter the chamber. If the surface is too rough or is nicked or burred, the bullet can get stuck. However, it’s less apparent why the bolt face needs to be smooth. When you visualize what’s going on when the advancing bolt strips a fresh round from the magazine, you can see that the cartridge head is first engaged by the bottom of the bolt. As forward motion continues, the cartridge head slides upward along the bolt face throughout the feeding process, finally reaching battery position. Now keep in mind that during this entire range of travel, the extractor claw is gripping the case head, holding it snugly against the bolt face. If the brass can’t slide freely across the face of the bolt, it can get hung up. If both the bolt face and the feed ramp are rough, you’ve got a double whammy in your hand, a jam guaranteed with every squeeze of the trigger. So I set to work, first with 600 grit, then with 1000 grit paper backed with wood, a dowel for the feed ramp, a narrow, flat strip for the bolt face. A Starbuck’s coffee swizzle is the right tool for this. Finally, I polished both with a strip of leather charged with gray buffing compound. Back at the range, bam, bam, bam. I ran 100 rounds through this pistol without a hic-cup. Once I was assured that the jamming—failure to feed—was rectified, I was able to pay attention to other things: the security feels good in the hand, comes on target easily, is heavy enough to have minimal recoil, and has a nice, crisp trigger, with minimal creep and reset. I prefer shooting it to my Glock, and consider it almost as sweet a shooter as my 9mm Springfield Armory 1911 Range Officer, which is the pinnacle of pistol perfection. The Security 9’s accuracy is good, too, at least for my copy. Now that I’m confident of its reliability, it’s become my go-to gun for home defense and lives in a drawer instead of the safe. I give this three stars because it’s a good example of firearms design using good materials, but Ruger’s manufacturing process shortcuts critical details. Assuming one thinks automatic functioning is critical to a semi-automatic pistol. If you’re willing to fettle this pistol into smooth operation, it’s a very good value, but if you want a gun that works flawlessly out of the box, spend more money and look elsewhere."

------
I added the bold for the important part. I did polish the feed ramp of one of my pistols and it seems to feed better now. I do not have a swizzle or anything to work on the bolt face area as of yet. If I find something maybe I'll give it a shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Interesting. My Security 9 is one of the earlier ones. It has a perfectly straight ejector and for well over 2000 rounds so far has been almost flawless. Maybe they have changed the design on the new ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Interesting. My Security 9 is one of the earlier ones. It has a perfectly straight ejector and for well over 2000 rounds so far has been almost flawless. Maybe they have changed the design on the new ones.
Same with mine


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I decided to be fair and polish the feed ramps for both pistols. The feed ramp width and depth seem to vary a bit. The new one is on the left and the older on the right.


144485
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hello everyone, first time gun owner here. Bought a new Security 9 about 3 weeks ago (against all feedback from friends), took it out shooting last weekend straight from the box, and had nothing but jams. I fired 75 rounds (30ct Federal brass & 45ct Browning brass), and approximately every 5 rounds the gun would fail to chamber the next round. The spent round would eject fine, but the next round would jam and leave the slide partially back. Used the two mags that came with the gun and same issue regardless of which I used. Also had a stove pipe 1 time. To avoid the “I told you so” I haven’t shared this with any friends lol I plan to clean and lubricate it and hopefully go out shooting again this weekend and see if it performs better.

I haven’t cleaned it yet, but I removed the slide and something caught my eye. The ejector is not straight, it bends to the left. When I put the slide back on, it actually makes contact with the slide - not enough to stop the slide, but contact nonetheless. Is this normal or could this be why my gun jammed so much? Is it something I can (or should) fix myself? How?

Appreciate any and all help. Attaching some pictures to show the ejector.
ChicoBass, I just purchased the Security 9 and was loading with some cheap plinking ammo and was having some issues with the feed like you mentioned. I noticed my ejector was slightly bent too. I took a small set of pliers and bent the tip ever so slightly back towards straight, although not all the way for fear of breaking it off. I reloaded the ammo and had no issue whatsoever with the feed. I have yet to clean it but I will before firing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I took a small set of pliers and bent the tip ever so slightly back towards straight, although not all the way for fear of breaking it off. I reloaded the ammo and had no issue whatsoever with the feed.
You are one brave dude. I wouldn't have the guts to do that, but I'm glad it's working for you now. Wouldn't it be funny if this whole time there was something wrong with the manufacturing assembly line, and thousands upon thousands of ejectors kept coming out bent and were still being installed in new pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
You are one brave dude. I wouldn't have the guts to do that, but I'm glad it's working for you now. Wouldn't it be funny if this whole time there was something wrong with the manufacturing assembly line, and thousands upon thousands of ejectors kept coming out bent and were still being installed in new pistols.
Update: I went to the range yesterday and put a little over 100 rounds through it and had 3-4 misdeeds and one fail to eject. Could be the cheap plink ammo I was using, but I’m still holding out hope theres just a small break in period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
1.Ruger P95 and Taurus G3, no problems, paid 249 for each.
2.Wiki describes all handgun mulfunctions and possible reasons in details.
3.Just for diagnosing use some grease on ramp and bullets.
 
21 - 40 of 45 Posts
Top