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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
:)

Been about a year, but, with a nice day out, took the SR9c out for a session. 50 rounds of Federal American Eagle 124gr FMJ

Nine inch paper plate at forty yards. ten of ten rounds hit the plate. 5 for 5 tries. (50 rounds total) Groups was not so great OH, but, getting 100% rounds on a nine inch plate for a whole box @ 40 yards for a "MidLife" guy is acceptable to me. :)
I dialed it in with a small screwdriver on the elevation of rear site. I had previously (last year) set the windage? (left right orientation) of the front site. This is my HD piece. I exercise it occasionally to keep current.

Really like this pistol. Am really thinking hard on a SR40c for 2013, buget allows. Would like a tad bit more punch in the same configuration. Will see what Santa thinks....
 

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Don't care for the video, I've always used a brass or aluminmum drift and plastic or wood mallet.

A case hardend wrench and a claw hammer :eek: are the tools of carpenters and mechanics not gunsmiths.

I've had my SR9c for a few weeks and love it.
 

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Don't care for the video, I've always used a brass or aluminmum drift and plastic or wood mallet.

A case hardend wrench and a claw hammer :eek: are the tools of carpenters and mechanics not gunsmiths.

Well we can't all be gunsmiths. It works and did not f the gun up any.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did find it odd that Ruger has absolutely NOTHING in their manual that came with the firearm that references adjusting the front site.
Nothing, nada.
Strange indeed.
My site came from factory way, way off.
I was trying to draw attention to this. The front sight could have been designed better. I see this as a defect in that holsterring this firearm will, eventually, disloge the front site.
 

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I did find it odd that Ruger has absolutely NOTHING in their manual that came with the firearm that references adjusting the front site.
Nothing, nada.
Strange indeed.
My site came from factory way, way off.
I was trying to draw attention to this. The front sight could have been designed better. I see this as a defect in that holsterring this firearm will, eventually, disloge the front site.
There is nothing wrong with the design of the front sight of the Ruger SR series. There are hundreds of other firearms using the same dovetail design.

On page 33 of both the original SR9c manual and also in the generic SR Series manual, Ruger says to make windage adjustment via the rear sight. The rear sight has a locking screw that maintains the adustment. It says the adjustment should be made with a wooden or plastic hammer.

The front sight on many firearms is moved only when adjustments can't be made in the rear.

Millions of dovetail style front sights aren't affected/dislodged by holstering.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Millions of dovetail style front sights aren't affected/dislodged by holstering.
Guess mine is one in a million! :)

Actually, if you want to get technical, the front site design is in fact poor. A perpendicular sliding (in relation to bore axis) dovetail is NOT what you want to properly orient a non-adjustable site to the centerline of the bore. Guns that do use this design include a stop to prevent horizontal (side-to-side) movement. A sliding dovetail on the bore axis would retain the site more effectively, maintaining the relationship to the bore much more accurately IMHO.
 

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SR9C and SR40C

As soon as the SR9C came out I emailed the CEO about the possibility of having the SR40C and sure enough shortly afterwards it did come out, and I rushed to get mine. Definately like both guns for concealed carry. The one thing I did since my eye sight isn't as good anymore, I changed my front sights to a fiber optic green and this made a hugh difference for me. I can acquire the front sight so much better and feel more comfortable being able to HIT my targets!!!

Hopefully Santa will be nice to you this year so you can have "Twins" like mine.:)
 

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Guess mine is one in a million! :)

Actually, if you want to get technical, the front site design is in fact poor. A perpendicular sliding (in relation to bore axis) dovetail is NOT what you want to properly orient a non-adjustable site to the centerline of the bore. Guns that do use this design include a stop to prevent horizontal (side-to-side) movement. A sliding dovetail on the bore axis would retain the site more effectively, maintaining the relationship to the bore much more accurately IMHO.

So your front sight has been affected by holstering? I thought you said it was off from the factory.

How often do you need to readjust it after holstering?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, my front site was off from the factory. I posted a video in an attempt to help others that may have been affected by the issue of a front site that is "non-adjustable" and may be off center-line of the bore axis and cannot be corrected by the rear site travel.
Based on the responses in this thread, I am much more reluctant to share information I feel may benefit others in the Ruger community.
I have removed the video from this thread.
 

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Yes, my front site was off from the factory. I posted a video in an attempt to help others that may have been affected by the issue of a front site that is "non-adjustable" and may be off center-line of the bore axis and cannot be corrected by the rear site travel.
Based on the responses in this thread, I am much more reluctant to share information I feel may benefit others in the Ruger community.
I have removed the video from this thread.
Removing your video is entirely your option.

If people want to view a video that provide front sight adjustment/replacement they can check here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=do8sHBDfIGk

I took exception to your saying that the dovetail method of attaching "the front site design is in fact poor. A perpendicular sliding (in relation to bore axis) dovetail is NOT what you want to properly orient a non-adjustable site to the centerline of the bore"

Millions and million of fine firearms do use a dovetailed front sight. Many of the 1911 series firearms have been doing that for more than 100 years. Most are locked in only by the dovetail pressure (and in many cases loctite.) It is not a poor design. Maybe someone at Ruger didn't adjust your front sight correctly. Mine was centered and after almost two years of holstering and carrying it in a Kydex holster, I see absolutely no movement. Has yours moved since you adjusted it?

The front sight on the SR9c IS adjustable, it's just harder to do and the rear sight, with the lock screw as noted in the manual, would appear to be the method that Ruger prefers the end user to use.

The dovetail on many front sights is actually narrower on one side than the other (or the sight dovetail is wider on one side) and they should be inserted in one direction and removed in the reverse direction. That's common gunsmithing information.

People's concerns over the use of the tools you suggested using in your video were not unreasonable.
 

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There you go again mndoggie, taking what people say literally, like they really mean what they are posting. When will you learn!
 

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My SR9c front sight was way off also and I tried to adjust it myself without any luck. So I took it to a local gunsmith. He told me that he has 'fixed' several SR series guns. seems that Ruger mills the 'dovetail' off center. He adjusted my sight then sighted it in to 25 yards using a bore laser. Will shoot it next weekend and see if it is better.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Millions and million of fine firearms do use a dovetailed front sight. Many of the 1911 series firearms have been doing that for more than 100 years.
This does not mean the design is superior to any other.
orienting a (non-adjustable, per Ruger) sight with a perpendicular sliding dovetail is NOT fixing the sight to the bore centerline. simple as that. Note that this is a "sliding" dovetail. Prone to misalignment by design. I don't know how I can be more clear on this point. Sure the sight is fixed tightly in the dovetail, but, the oportunity for misalignment is increased since the "sliding" dovetail is perpendicular to the bore axis, instead of directly inline over the bore centerline.
 

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This does not mean the design is superior to any other.
orienting a (non-adjustable, per Ruger) sight with a perpendicular sliding dovetail is NOT fixing the sight to the bore centerline. simple as that. Note that this is a "sliding" dovetail. Prone to misalignment by design. I don't know how I can be more clear on this point. Sure the sight is fixed tightly in the dovetail, but, the oportunity for misalignment is increased since the "sliding" dovetail is perpendicular to the bore axis, instead of directly inline over the bore centerline.
And examples of the design of which you speak would be?

Fixing the sight to the bore centerline is merely an adjustment, not a design issue.

Perhaps you don't like to have the ability to make adjustments. I do. I think most firearm owners do too. In reading reviews of firearms, the vast majority of reviewers give "extra points" to adjustable front and rear sights.

I suppose the front sight could be machined into the slide so it could never move (like the non-existant machined sights on my LCP.) But then it would be hard to use aftermarket sights.

Again, I've carried my SR9c for more than 2 years without any misalignment, in a tight fitting holster with lots of opportunity for misalignment to happen.

As near as I can tell, your SR8c was not aligned well at the factory, you adjusted it and it has been fine ever since. How is that a problem?
 

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This does not mean the design is superior to any other.
orienting a (non-adjustable, per Ruger) sight with a perpendicular sliding dovetail is NOT fixing the sight to the bore centerline. simple as that. Note that this is a "sliding" dovetail. Prone to misalignment by design. I don't know how I can be more clear on this point. Sure the sight is fixed tightly in the dovetail, but, the oportunity for misalignment is increased since the "sliding" dovetail is perpendicular to the bore axis, instead of directly inline over the bore centerline.
Ruger specifically says that the front sight is adjustable.

Please look at the picture on page 9 of the manual. It says that both the front and rear sights are adjustable for windage.
 

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If Ruger sent a gun that the front sight base was off center my gunsmith would catch that before I ever saw the gun. He would send the gun back on Ruger's dime. He charges $40 for a FFL or $75 to order a gun direct from the manufacturer. It's worth every penny! He inspects things I would never think about. He tells me what machine work if any the gun needs, if any before I say "order it" to get the best out of the gun.

People think a LGS is their best friend. A good, honest gunsmith is your best friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
In the video you posted, the presenter states that he's been to shooting matches where people's front sights have "fallen off" during the match! :rolleyes: Mine has been fine since I adjusted it. And yours seems to be fine as well. Sights can and do, fall out of alignment, however.

Fixing the sight to the bore centerline is merely an adjustment, not a design issue.
And I was offering a method to adjust the sight that you did not agree with.
 
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