Ruger Forum banner
1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a LCP MAX a few weeks ago. The slide is already starting to rust. My EC9S does the same. Is it just me or does Ruger have horrible bluing on their guns?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
Bluing is a lousy rust preventative. Keep them wiped down and oiled. Try Hornady One Shot. That's a good rust preventative and a good dry lube for semi-autos. I have an LCP II that I've carried lots and mostly during the summer. Not a speck of rust on it - ever. The only rust I've ever had on any of my firearms in the 50 years I've owned them was a spot on the barrel of my Ruger 77 rifle that, for a short time, had to be stored in a loft. It had a pinky nail size spot of rust and I took that off with some fine steel wool and oil and then spot blued. It never returned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
Ruger should just Nitride all their cheap guns, it is a very cost effective treatment and finish. The matte finish they use is pretty skimpy.

I recently bought a decent BCG for my AR on sale that is completely Nitrided inside and out and was $70. There is more metal in my BCG than an LCP.
 

·
Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
Joined
·
3,489 Posts
I got a LCP MAX a few weeks ago. The slide is already starting to rust. My EC9S does the same. Is it just me or does Ruger have horrible bluing on their guns?
My LCP has been in my pocket for years and years. And the pocket holster is usually soaked through with sweat, when I’m working outside on a hot, humid summer day.

Of course I Froglubed the slide, which is just a coconut-oil based product. There are many other good oils that have been reviewed here over the years.

If you chose to not protect your gun’s metal and allow it to rust, that was a personal choice you made. You must have wanted it that way or not cared, since you apparently have access to the Internet — pretty much the sum total of all human knowledge at your fingertips.

if you chose not to take advantage of that and protect your gun, that’s on you, not on Ruger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Those guns are not blued.
Ruger has, in the last decade or so, used a process generically called "black oxide", which ranges from twenty seconds in heavy oil at a temp just below a boil - to more expensive options for more expensive guns.

Corrosion visible under these coatings is due to a failure of passivation of ferrites in the metal.
But it is a failure.
Why accept it in a new gun?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Enjoyed the posts here on this thread. Not a handgun but my Ruger American Rimfire does have the black oxide but is a glossy satin unlike the centerfires. Seems durable so far but I make sure I keep barrel and receiver wiped down with oil cloth often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
Enjoyed the posts here on this thread. Not a handgun but my Ruger American Rimfire does have the black oxide but is a glossy satin unlike the centerfires. Seems durable so far but I make sure I keep barrel and receiver wiped down with oil cloth often.
That works dandy on long guns and I do it also, even on my stainless firearms. But on a pocket gun, the oily rag treatment attracts lint and pocket mung. I keep my pocket guns dry. I sold my black LCP and bought a hard chrome one. Then I decided I would just carry my J-frame and traded the chromed LCP for a 10-22.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Those guns are not blued.
Ruger has, in the last decade or so, used a process generically called "black oxide", which ranges from twenty seconds in heavy oil at a temp just below a boil - to more expensive options for more expensive guns.
Bluing and black oxide are the same thing. (Bluing (steel) - Wikipedia)
"Bluing is a passivation process in which steel is partially protected against rust using a black oxide coating"
"In colloquial use, thin coatings of black oxide are often termed 'gun bluing', while heavier coatings are termed 'black oxide'. Both refer to the same chemical process for providing true gun bluing"
"Black oxide provides minimal protection against corrosion, unless also treated with a water-displacing oil"

Basically black oxide and bluing are interchangeable terms. Black oxide must be kept oiled to prevent rust. When you wipe all the oil off a black oxide gun, it is going to rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
Maybe if a slide is showing rust, and environmental factors make its presence inevitable, it might just make sense to boil the slide to turn the rust into a protective oxidized coating like historical gunsmiths used to do back in the day.
 

·
Viceroy 🟩🟩🟩
Joined
·
3,489 Posts
My LCP had surface rust also. And I take similar care of all my guns, no matter the price point. Not every complaint is user error.
Corrosion visible under these coatings is due to a failure of passivation of ferrites in the metal. ... Why accept it in a new gun?
We don't know that the new gun arrived rusted or somehow defective. In fact, the original poster has has "rust problems" on two out of two Rugers, one of which was "recently purchased".

He also did not state what rust prevention measures he took when he brought the guns home. He didn't state if he de-greased them with rubbing alcohol and applied some sort of preservative that goes on dry and doesn't attract lint (e.g. One Shot), or something that is applied like a wax (Froglube or Renaissance) -- all of which have already been mentioned in this thread, and many hundreds of times in this forum over the last few years.

It is very likely user error unless he has the care and attention to detail to come back here and explain his gun care regimen and post some photos.

Nothing changes the fact that if you clean and Froglube a pocket pistol every few months it is highly unlikely that it will rust. I have a Google Calendar alert to remind me do this to my LCP every six months.

This old rust blog test has been posted here umpteen times, and my son and I repeated it for a school science fair a few years ago with the same results. Other people have performed and posted pictures here of similar tests using pieces of steel. In my son's case, new pieces of cold-rolled steel treated with Froglube remained rust-free for nearly a month outdoors, in the snow, sun, wind, and rain, and with my son periodically spraying it with saltwater. At the other end of the spectrum, an untreated control piece of steel and one treated with Remoil rusted the most quickly in our test.

Here's the link again, and some of the guy's photos from the blog....


Wood Outdoor bench Rectangle Font Wood stain


Product Rectangle Font Line Material property

Wood Rectangle Brick Stairs Publication
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
We don't know that the new gun arrived rusted or somehow defective. In fact, the original poster has has "rust problems" on two out of two Rugers, one of which was "recently purchased".

He also did not state what rust prevention measures he took when he brought the guns home. He didn't state if he de-greased them with rubbing alcohol and applied some sort of preservative that goes on dry and doesn't attract lint (e.g. One Shot), or something that is applied like a wax (Froglube or Renaissance) -- all of which have already been mentioned in this thread, and many hundreds of times in this forum over the last few years.

It is very likely user error unless he has the care and attention to detail to come back here and explain his gun care regimen and post some photos.

Nothing changes the fact that if you clean and Froglube a pocket pistol every few months it is highly unlikely that it will rust. I have a Google Calendar alert to remind me do this to my LCP every six months.

This old rust blog test has been posted here umpteen times, and my son and I repeated it for a school science fair a few years ago with the same results. Other people have performed and posted pictures here of similar tests using pieces of steel. In my son's case, new pieces of cold-rolled steel treated with Froglube remained rust-free for nearly a month outdoors, in the snow, sun, wind, and rain, and with my son periodically spraying it with saltwater. At the other end of the spectrum, an untreated control piece of steel and one treated with Remoil rusted the most quickly in our test.

Here's the link again, and some of the guy's photos from the blog....


View attachment 163148

View attachment 163149
View attachment 163150
Thanks for posting that article. I was actually trying to find it again a while back and couldn't. That article was what encouraged me to buy more Frog Lube after I'd previously run out of it. I had a big bottle of Tetra Gun synthetic oil that I was trying to use up before getting more Frog Lube, but I decided to get more Frog Lube anyhow. It's what I use on my carry guns, now, while I just use the Tetra Gun on my other range guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Ruger should just Nitride all their cheap guns, it is a very cost effective treatment and finish. The matte finish they use is pretty skimpy.

I recently bought a decent BCG for my AR on sale that is completely Nitrided inside and out and was $70. There is more metal in my BCG than an LCP.
Totally agree!!! Even if they increase the price a few bucks .. my LCP is a rust bucket and I take care of it. Sigs, glocks, S&W, walthers no issues with rust. The only rust issue I have is some very minor surface rust on some old mec gar mags .. it’s a shame because the concept of the LCP is good and the overall build quality besides cheap finish is good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
BTW, I never tried Froglube and just might.

I rustproof my motorcycle and vehicle frames with aviation grade ACF 50 and have quantities of it on hand already. It is great stuff also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
@FeralCatKillr ..............I try to not make assumptions and to offer help instead of criticism. I also help the local animal shelter trap feral cats and get them fixed. My latest rescue. View attachment 163156
Holy mackerel! He looks like our cat when he was about six months old. We got him from a shelter when he was only about a month and a half old.

Back on the subject of surface rust (@terry_p ;)), the biggest takeaway here is that modern handgun offerings should have a finish that holds up against rust without the need for regular application of protestants outside what you do after routine range trips. Nitride and every other modern coating adds little to the cost of a handgun and should be a baseline expectation. To lower such expectations for new handgun offerings would be similar to accepting that a modern TV had a spin dial and didn't have a remote control feature.
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top