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At the range today with my GP100. My plastic safety glasses keep fogging up to the point where my sight picture gets fuzzy and ruins my scores.

Is there a defogger spray for these kind of safety glasses?

Or has anyone bought professional prescription shooting eyewear? Don't they fog up too?

Thanks
 

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At the range today with my GP100. My plastic safety glasses keep fogging up to the point where my sight picture gets fuzzy and ruins my scores.

Is there a defogger spray for these kind of safety glasses?

Or has anyone bought professional prescription shooting eyewear? Don't they fog up too?

Thanks
Great topic! In my line of work this has always been an issue. No one believes me, but try it. I wash plastic safety glasses (any shade color) with gojo, and rinse with cold water. Lasts about 2 hours ime. Ymmv
 

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I had cataract surgery this month and I will be able to shoot next month. I have not worn regular safety glasses in years and I am in need of brand and color of lens to buy. Advice/opinions appreciated. Thanks.
 

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At the range today with my GP100. My plastic safety glasses keep fogging up to the point where my sight picture gets fuzzy and ruins my scores.

Is there a defogger spray for these kind of safety glasses?

Or has anyone bought professional prescription shooting eyewear? Don't they fog up too?

Thanks
A small squirt of common rubbing alcohol and wiped will help with the fogging problem.
 

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I just treated our cars' windows with Rain-X as I swear by that stuff. Makes a huge difference and easy. They make a similar product called Fog-X for interior glass and mirrors. It may even come in wipe form. Were I in your shoes, I'd have to try that on my safety glasses. No dog in race, just a random speculation. Good Luck
 

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I bought the disposable anti fog wipes on Amazon. They work well. The little towelettes are very wet and should treat a couple of pairs of glasses each. It takes the lenses a minute to dry and clear up so treat them before you are ready to shoot. I have three sets of safety glasses that I use depending on conditions. Usually clear for indoors, yellow for overcast/hazy days, and smoked for bright sunlight. I had laser cataract surgery a few years ago. The results were fantastic.
 

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I run prescription safety glasses with all the fancy no glare/no fog coatings and of course have no issues. For me it is worth it as I have an astigmatism and if I don’t wear prescription glasses when using one of my guns with electronic sights, I get big distortion. A red dot becomes a fuzzy figure 8.
If you wear prescription glasses, it’s worth it. You don’t need the fancy brand name frames, just a good plastic wrap around safety frame which is usually on the cheaper side of frames. The other trick is that if you have employer provided optical insurance and there is an eye PPE requirement then many times the insurance will fully cover a pair of prescription safety glasses. Worth an ask anyway.
 

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I just use my regular no-line trifocal eyeglasses. They have polycarbonate lenses, and I've never had anything hit them, knock on wood. Safety glasses that fit over regular distort too much, and goggles distort and get hot.
 
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I had cataract surgery this month and I will be able to shoot next month. I have not worn regular safety glasses in years and I am in need of brand and color of lens to buy. Advice/opinions appreciated. Thanks.
Dillon Precision offers plain or Bifocal shooting glasses for a reasonable price. I bought two, and have been satisfied. They also carry a more expen$ive brand.
 

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One other add to my post #8. If you have employer-provided vision insurance, even if you don’t need a prescription, check to see if it covers safety glasses. Until you start getting into the pricy glasses, most normal safety glasses are cheap and have some optical distortion. This distortion not only distorts (ever so slightly) the sight picture, but introduces a lot of eye strain. So even if you don’t need corrective lenses, especially if your insurance covers it, get a set of quality safety glasses that are optically pure. It very well may be a benefit you have not yet used.
Think if it this way. Ever had a pair of safety glasses that while comfortable to wear, in between shooting sets you can’t wait to take them off? That is the eye strain from the distortion. At the very least it’s worth checking with your insurance.
 

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Or has anyone bought professional prescription shooting eyewear?
Yessir.
I have computer/shooting/occupational glasses.
The lineless bifocal is much higher up on the lens.

They allow my front and rear pistol sights to be crisp and clear.
A 3 inch target dot at 25 yards is a little blurry but manageable.
They do not work so well with iron rifle sights.

They also do wonders when working overhead or at a high angle.
Changing a lightbulb is no longer done by 'feel'.

The glasses cost me right at $300 (with insurance) with lineless bifocal, polycarb lenses, anti-reflective coating, anti-scratch coating.
These are normal eyeglasses, not goggles.
This is through my optometrist. You might be able to lower that through Walmart or Warby Parker.

YMMV
 
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I’ve worn prescription glasses since 3rd grade and have had prescription safety glasses since high school. When my glasses fog up I just use a bit of saliva to wet them and the polish the with a soft cloth…done it for years. It’s the same reason you see scuba divers spitting in their masks before they go under.
 

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I found a box of the Fog-X wipes that someone else mentioned. They come in the little single tear open packs like the hand wipes. I have a pocket in my range bag, and I just toss in a couple of the packs. Where I really need them is when doing yard work as I always wear eye protection. I got a bad cut a couple of summers ago while I was running a string trimmer, even though I had on glasses.

The big issue with fog is because I also wear a face covering (a Sun Buff) to cut the sun, filter the grass pollen, dust and bugs. And when working up a serious sweat my glasses fog up quickly ... the Fog-X works pretty well.
 
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