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Discussion Starter #1
I've read in various threads where some of you do your own reloading. No doubt you trust your own work and are assured that you have loaded them with the correct amount of powder. That's all well and good.

My question concerns purchasing reloads from folks at gun shows, whom you don't know from Adam. Is it safe to buy such ammo? Is there any difference of things to watch out for when buying reloads that will be shot in a revolver as opposed to ammo bought for a semi-auto? I plan to attend a gun show this weekend and will look for a bargain on ammo if it seems the right thing to do... As always, thanks for any insight that you'd care to offer.

Amistad
'loaded for bear in Texas'
 

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I would not buy any reloaded Ammo unless I personally knew who had loaded it and it was reliable. Why don't you reload? Its easy and I enjoy it. That way you know what you have got. :) Otherwise I would watch for bargains on new Ammo.
 

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quote:Originally posted by KP97DC

I would not buy any reloaded Ammo unless I personally knew who had loaded it and it was reliable. Why don't you reload? Its easy and I enjoy it. That way you know what you have got. :) Otherwise I would watch for bargains on new Ammo.
KP's right, as usual. Reloading is a good way to relax after a day's work. Plus, you can work up a load that your gun likes & improve the accuracy at the same time. Personally, I wouldn't buy relods from gun shows, or anywhere else. I do shoot some of my friends reloads & they shoot mine. The thing is, we know & trust each other to build reliable & safe ammo.
 

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Good advice Calvin and Kansas. Besides, it's just too much fun loading your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the replies. I'm sure that it's bound to be a lot of fun loading your own. That brings up a couple of other questions --
1. About how much would it cost for me to set up to load .38 Special and .45ACP? (A ballpark figure is fine, as no doubt there are many variables.)
2. By what amount would you say you end up saving by doing your own? Half? More?

Amistad
'might be going "whole hog" soon! ;)'
 

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quote:Originally posted by Amistad

Thank you for the replies. I'm sure that it's bound to be a lot of fun loading your own. That brings up a couple of other questions --
1. About how much would it cost for me to set up to load .38 Special and .45ACP? (A ballpark figure is fine, as no doubt there are many variables.)
2. By what amount would you say you end up saving by doing your own? Half? More?

Amistad
'might be going "whole hog" soon! ;)'
Depends how fancy or basic, fast or slow

My suggestion is to go to
www.leeprecision.com

from there you can look at the various types of presses that they offer from single stage to turret to progressive.
You can read up on all of the equipment offered and how it works. They even have some demonstration videos about the various processes there. From that point you can get a basic understanding of the various presses and operations---be it Lee, rcbs, redding, hornady, or what ever brand equipment that you go with.

Lee does offer some "kits" in which you get a majority of equipment. My favorite is the delux turret kit which is a semi-progressive. With this kit you can load pistol or rifle rounds easily. You can also choose to set it up to operate as a single stage type press for pistol/rifle ammo or set it up with the auto index feature with pistol ammo for faster production. Die changes with this press take just a few seconds in changing out the drop in turret.

All the prices at the lee site are suggested retail. You can go to other vendors such a www.midwayusa.com and get it much cheaper. The lee delux turret kit from midway is around $100.00.

I'll take a whack at guessing of the top of my head for equipment:
Lee delux turret kit-----100.00
x-tra turret--------------10.00
lee carbide dies 38-------25.00
lee carbide 45acp---------25.00

want to make it cheaper,
Lee challenger basic kit---35.00
lee carbide dies 38spl-----25.00
lee carbide dies 45--------25.00
this will get you going but will be slow as it is a single stage press with all the die changing and the usage of the powder dippers supplied with the dies will really slow you down.

That should give you a general idea about start up costs with Lee and you can add or change the variables as you wish. Other similar comparisons can be made with rcbs, hornady, etc, and their equipment is all good but the costs will be higher.

Costs savings will be significant and you will recover your equipment costs quickly if you shoot alot. Here is a thread about the cost savings:
http://www.rugerforum.net/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2365

good places to purchase reloading equipment are:
http://www.midwayusa.com/
http://www.lockstock.com/products.asp?dept=418
http://www.natchezss.com/

hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for a very insightful post, deputy125. We'll see what the future holds for me in this regard.

Amistad
'having great gun fun in Texas!'
 

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Amistad,
Reloading is a great hobby. If it is too wet, cold, hot, etc. to go to the range...stay indoors and reload. I started out with a Lee deluxe kit and it paid for itself with all the $ I saved. Don't get me wrong, I still bought factory ammo sometimes but when I reloaded I could afford to shoot alot more. The money you save on a few hundred rounds of .45ACP will likely cover the cost of the LEE kit and a few hundred more would cover (or close to cover) the cost of more expensive equipment like an RCBS or Redding kit. The more you shoot, the more you would save.[8D]
 
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