Ruger Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Co-worker has a Savage 110 with the tang safety. Curious if there's an easy cure for the really heavy effort needed to engage/dis-engae the safety. Not familiar with the design myself but from the few schematics I've been able to find, it appears to be a spring/ball detent design. Ideas from experience?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
They get much easier the more you use them. They'll generally break-in after a hundred or so cycles but you can speed this process up with a Dremel and some jewelers rouge if you wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Personally, I wouldn't use a Dremel on any fire control mechanism parts, but that's just me. I certainly agree that polishing can help. It's also possible that the safety engagement screw could use a little 'fine tuning.'

OTOH, it's just a Savage. They're alright for what they are (I have/have had several), but they very rough, and very-quickly-assembled guns. Consequently, there's LOTS of variation among them, and while some are really pretty good, some are distinctly junky-feeling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Personally, I wouldn't use a Dremel on any fire control mechanism parts, but that's just me. I certainly agree that polishing can help. It's also possible that the safety engagement screw could use a little 'fine tuning.'

OTOH, it's just a Savage. They're alright for what they are (I have/have had several), but they very rough, and very-quickly-assembled guns. Consequently, there's LOTS of variation among them, and while some are really pretty good, some are distinctly junky-feeling.
A skilled individual can safely use a dremel with polishing compound and cotton pads anywhere on a firearm without concern. You would only be helping to speed up the break-in process, not removing material like "stoning" or grinding. Savages are "allright" indeed, only the most accurate production rifle on earth, with that said, they do tend to be a little rough around the edges and that's what the Dremel does best, smoothes out the rough spots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Not one for Dremel use on such parts either. Much more control with hands than machine even in "skilled" hands.
Also not one that see's them as "just a Savage" or Savage as "junky feeling". While not fancied up and polished they're a good working gun. MUCH rather have that than fancy and flashy for such a purpose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
I've paid lots and littles for many different Savages, and my experience shows a very different picture of them than the internet reputation. They're similar to the other big names out there out-of-the-box, perhaps on the better side of average for precision, but that comes with draw-backs such as high variability in the quality & feel of the trigger mechanisms, and some of the absolute worst-fouling (meaning most-fouling), roughest barrels in the industry (but not all of them are this way; another indication of the variability in the product). This doesn't necessarily make them shoot poorly, at least until the fouling builds up. Then it goes to h311 in a handbasket.

But that wasn't what this thread was supposed to be about. Hopefully, O.P. can help their co-worker get the sticky/rough/poorly-executed safety mechanism smoothed out without adversely impacting the safety of the mechanism.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
I've paid lots and littles for many different Savages, and my experience shows a very different picture of them than the internet reputation. They're similar to the other big names out there out-of-the-box, perhaps on the better side of average for precision, but that comes with draw-backs such as high variability in the quality & feel of the trigger mechanisms, and some of the absolute worst-fouling (meaning most-fouling), roughest barrels in the industry (but not all of them are this way; another indication of the variability in the product). This doesn't necessarily make them shoot poorly, at least until the fouling builds up. Then it goes to h311 in a handbasket.

But that wasn't what this thread was supposed to be about. Hopefully, O.P. can help their co-worker get the sticky/rough/poorly-executed safety mechanism smoothed out without adversely impacting the safety of the mechanism.
What you are referring to as "a sticky/rough/ poorly executed safety mechanism" is actually machined that way to allow for a proper break-in. It will get better with each use, it's actually designed to be that way. Even my Weatherby's & Blasers get better (smoother) with use but none of them will print the "aspirin sized" groups that any of my Savages will. As far as fouling goes, ALL centerfire rifles are prone to fouling without proper maintenance, this is the very reason cleaning kits are so widely available & used by professional and novice shooters alike! I believe you may have aquired a "lemon" Savage by the way you speak of them. You should have let them know about it, they would have made it right for you, guaranteed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
What you are referring to as "a sticky/rough/ poorly executed safety mechanism" is actually machined that way to allow for a proper break-in.
What utter hogwash. It's simply poorly executed pieces/interfaces. Some of them operate smoothly, some not-so-smoothly, and some poorly. Same with their triggers, bolts, barrels, receivers, and so forth. It's simply the variance that their production processes allow. My latest from them has a crisp yet smooth safety mechanism. There's none of your hypothetical 'machined that way to 'allow' break-in' nonsense.

I've had a true lemon from Savage before, some years ago. I was much younger then, and although I bought it under the current organization's tenure, they said it had been manufactured prior to the bankruptcy (which I knew nothing about at that time) and so they would not touch it nor even discuss troubleshooting. I rebarreled it, lapped the lugs and raceways, replaced the stock, and replaced the scope and mounts. At that point, aside from having spent well more than what I'd spent on the gun in the first place, I had a good-shooting Frankenstein that I sold off at a huge loss before long.

The present gun is enormously frustrating, and I have talked with Savage, but it's not quite time to send it back. They offered to evaluate it, and if what I'm doing now doesn't correct the issue, I'll send it to them to fix. I just won't be buying another any time soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
What utter hogwash. It's simply poorly executed pieces/interfaces. Some of them operate smoothly, some not-so-smoothly, and some poorly. Same with their triggers, bolts, barrels, receivers, and so forth. It's simply the variance that their production processes allow. My latest from them has a crisp yet smooth safety mechanism. //QUOTE=]

I don't have, nor have I ever seen any of these phantom "variances" you speak of in any of my 11 different Savages which span 40 years of manufacturing precision. They were all pretty much the same, a little rough feeling at first and then shortly there after smoothed out with use, just as they should. I've felt the actions & safety's of several new Savage models when shopping for my latest .22-250 and they all felt the same, consistantly slightly gritty but a very positive feel to all of them. This "variance" you refer to is not realistic or as you stated, "hogwash"! They are all made with blueprints and precision machined with the tight tolerances that earned Savage the title of the most accurate out of box rifle on the planet. I don't want to argue about Savages precision built weapons as I believe they are as they say "the most accurate out of box rifle on the planet" they certainly wouldn't have earned that title if they made "poorly executed triggers, barrels, receivers and so fourth" as you stated. If you don't like unbelievably accurate, durable and reliable rifles then maybe Savage's just aren't for you. Enough said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
Having no experience with something doesn't suggest that it doesn't exist or happen.
Savage makes great guns, mediocre guns, and poor guns, all more or less at the same time; that's what their process yields.
enough said
:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,096 Posts
Co-worker has a Savage 110 with the tang safety. Curious if there's an easy cure for the really heavy effort needed to engage/dis-engae the safety. Not familiar with the design myself but from the few schematics I've been able to find, it appears to be a spring/ball detent design. Ideas from experience?
I have Savage/Stevens .22 with that same safety & it's about 12 years old & it's still the way you describe. I just live with it.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top