Ruger Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm topping a 375 Guide with a VX6 1-6x. The fov is awesome on 1x but you can see too much of the barrel if I mount it low. I want to use the extra high rings but wonder what the disadvantage would be.
 

·
Spellign Bee Champ
Joined
·
15,546 Posts
Welcome from Nor-Cal! You did right posting it here in the Optics sub-forum. You should be getting your answer soon from one of our experts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Other than the bell clearing the barrel, I think the other thing ring height affects is how naturally your face fits the stock when looking through the scope. The down side of tall rings may be an unnatural cheek weld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,560 Posts
Other than the bell clearing the barrel, I think the other thing ring height affects is how naturally your face fits the stock when looking through the scope. The down side of tall rings may be an unnatural cheek weld.
+1, that and how well your bolt clears and operates. But I firmly agree, once the scope clears the barrel, go for as natural a check weld as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
+1, that and how well your bolt clears and operates. But I firmly agree, once the scope clears the barrel, go for as natural a check weld as possible.
Agree with all these things.
Sometimes using higher scope rings may be necessary. Either clearing the scope bell, or room to operate the bolt or charging handles, fixed sights, etc.
Leaving you trying to suspend your head above the stock, instead of obtaining a good cheek weld.
If that's the case, look into adding an adjustable cheek riser.

SOUTHWEST PRECISION, LLC

I'm at work, so no pics.
Installed one on an older Bishop Monte Carlo type stock that has a Springfield 30-06 stuck in it.
Unless I wanted to spend a bunch of money on an old sniper bolt and machine work, the rings had to be tall enough to clear the original bolt handle.
This raised the scope up too high for comfort.

Used the Southwest Precision Adjustable Cheek Rest model 611-02. Nice heavy thermoset. They're pretty much the same, but unlike the Karsten cheek piece, the Southwest Precision cheek rest also comes with a thin, adhesive-backed closed cell pad to add to the top of the cheek rest and different thru bolts.
Then it's not cold, slippery plastic on your cheek. It's slightly spongy for a more secure weld. Easy to cut, saw, file or sand to whatever shape you need if need the cheek rest to be.
Very simple to install. Position it, mark it, and drill two 1/4" holes thru the stock. Bolt it on. Has more than enough vertical adjustment with a supplied allen wrench. The Karsten has large knobs sticking out the side for adjustments.
A pivot or catch point not found on the Southwest Precision model.
Once any cheek rest is set to your shooting style, there really isn't a need for knobs sticking out the side for further adjustments.
The Southwest Precision cheek rest uses a flush socket head type blind nut. Clean install. The 1/4" thick thermoset plastic is very durable and very easy to work with. Check out their website.
BTW, this is something I ended up finding on the internet. I am in no way vested with Southwest Precision.

No regrets. Works bitchen'.

Good luck with your project.

The link above is where I bought it from.

Talked to Bob Racine
Southwest Precision
Lake Havasu City, AZ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
You will always want to position the scope as close to the barrel as possible.
The farther away the scope is from the barrel, the more likely you will require a Cant level gage to insure that the scope and barrel are level before you pull the trigger.
The taller your scope mounting, anything less than perfect vertical, and your POI is drifting away from your POA.
If your rifle is canted to the left, your POI is up and to the right.
If you're canted to the right, your POI is up and to the left.
Easily recognized in the extreme, if you turn your rifle on it's side and look thru the scope.
Your POA is now off to the side, but your POI is straight down the barrel.
Does the same thing when the firearm is Canted only slightly. Only the distance is less. The longer the shot, the greater the Cant, or lack thereof, plays in making that shot.
Doesn't take much to miss that perfect once in a lifetime long shot.

I put Wheeler Cant gages on all my scopes. No matter the caliber. .22 to .50 cal. All of them get a Cant gage.
Just helps to insure vertical orientation. The rest is up to me. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
Seeing the barrel at 1x on a low power scope is normal. Just a matter of getting used to it. Myself, I would not want to lose a good cheek weld by going to a higher scope mount just to get rid of it. Also, a lot of low power scopes won't have enough elevation adjustment to cover a scope that is mounted unusually high on the gun. At very close range with a scope mounted extra high, you may find your gun shoots low and you won't have enough elevation adjustment left on your scope to correct it. The good news is that going to 2x or 3x on your scope makes the barrel disappear in the FOV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
I agree with several other replies. I always mount a scope as low as possible without it resting on the barrel. I have to admit I have never seen the barrel through a scope, even my Redfield 1.75-5X Wideview.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
650 Posts
Raising a scope is never a good idea. If you can see the barrel at 1x shoot the rifle enough to get used to seeing the barrel. A low scope mount is always more accurate and durable.

Don't give up functionality to get around something that will not give you a second thought after some practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
There are multiple factors at play here and I will try to help with each.

1. Parallax. This is the main reason you should mount a scope as close to bore as practical. Picture your bore pointing at your target and the scope pointing at the target. Your picture should look like a >. The wider the angle the less precise the scope will be at any given range. Do not confuse this with internal parallax ad defined for use in AO or parallax adjustment on scopes. The form of parallax I refer here to is the displacement of your view of the target and how it differs from the muzzle/projectile's view of the target. This offset is what gets a lot of chronographs shot! You look through the scope, it looks good. Next thing you know, your chrony is in pieces. Why? the bullet was lower than your eye.

Without turrets, AO and/or side adjustments, your scope is only pointing where the bullet goes at a fixed distance, say 100yd. Lets say you look at 200yd. If the scope is as low as possible, the scope and muzzle aim points change LESS than if the scope is mounted way up high. And the further out (or in) you go from zero, the worse it gets. Another example, if you play games on a console or computer. Ever play those driving games where they put you outside the car and above the roof? Notice how much harder it is to drive from there and how much less comfortable you are than when inside a car? Its because you are looking at the view from an abstract angle, one vastly different from your natural view sitting inside the car.

This should explain it...


2. Cheek position and eye relief. These are the other factors to mounting a scope. These depend on stock design and accommodations. A fixed cheek stock doesn't allow you much vertical wiggle room. You need to match your eye position using the correct rings that align the scope to your eye when your cheek is properly positioned on the stock. If you use too low or too high rings, then you must then unnaturally position your cheek on the stock. This will result in abnormal movement each time you position for a shot and that translates in inconsistent shot placement. If you have a stock with an adjustable cheek plate, you can mount your scope in a much wider range of heights and then adjust your stock cheek to place your eye at the proper location. This does NOT fix #1 above with respect to parallax.

Because of #1 parallax, you should place your scope as close to bore height as possible and still maintain #2 proper cheek position.


See this:
Optical sights
Read sections on "Parallax" and "Mounts and rings"

Also watch this to understand internal parallax:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ziKTDIMCig
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
17,041 Posts
Shootwice, Wolfie covered the situation quite well. If you want more scope info ... to include high scope mounts, take a look at a document in the Forum Library titled "Scope Dope". You need 10 posts to access the library so get busy. Here's a link: http://rugerforum.net/library/61505-scope-dope.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all for the replies. Great information. I'm going to try the Ruger extra high mounts and I will still have a solid cheek. After some practice I'm sure I will get used to seeing the barrel in the scope. It is better than mounting the scope unusually high. Thanks again.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top