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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just installed a new Nikon Rimfire ll 3x9x40 BDC? How can you tell if the scope is wandering. I boresighed the scope on my 10/22, dead center. When I shot it, it was was about 10" high, and, about that much to the left. When I checked it with the bore sight after I sort of got sighted in, it's 5" high and 2" left on the boresight recticle. This was a new rifle with a cpc bolt tune up and a trigger rework with 2.5 lb pull. Don't think I pulled it that bad. Tku
 

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Is the rifle grouping, or is it all over the place?

If it is grouping, more than likely it is the installation. It could be as simple as adjusting the windage and elevation to move the point of impact on target.

If it is "spraying", something is "loose".

I recommend making only one change at a time to make things easier to diagnose.

Someone will come along with a better option for you. I'm sure

Keep us posted.
 

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Just because you got it dead on with the bore sighter, doesn't mean it will not still need to be further adjusted with actual shooting. Boresighting is just meant to get it close to save ammo, but many think that because someone bore sighted it, it will be dead on and no further adjustment is necessary.
As cptpoly said, if it is shooting small clusters, just make small adjustments until it's where you want it.
If you get it hitting where you want on the target, don't fret because the boresighter says it's off. Put the boresighter away at this point.
It's always a good idea to secure the screws holding your base on, as they are not easy to check for tightness without removing the scope and losing your zero. Degrease the scope base screws and put a drop of blue Loctite on them when you put the scope base on.
The screws on the rings are easy enough to get to to check periodically, so no Loctite is needed on them.
 

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Once you are on target put the bore sighter away and focus on group size. If it's shooting tight groups the just move the sights. If there is no consistent group then you have problem with the install or the scope itself.
 

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As others have already said, the bore sighter is only roughly accurate, just enough to get you on paper with the scope. If the rifle is shooting reasonably tight groups on target, your scope isn't moving.



Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, looks like I've had a couple things going on, installation problems, plus, flinching and pulling the shot off. I just had Randy at CPC, tune my trigger. It's set at 2.5 lb. I'm still pulling the shot when I try to squeeze the trigger. Would less poundage help with the trigger flinch? Thanks again.
 

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Cannot make comments other then you yourself can control the flinching now I would check the installation problems if there is something. But just because you have bore sighted your gun but then your groups are all over the place one thing is your flinching but if there is any play no matter how slight in your scope rings or mounts that is the first place to check and retighten things down again then see how things go. Good luck BTW the Nikon scope you have is a top quality scope!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cannot make comments other then you yourself can control the flinching now I would check the installation problems if there is something. But just because you have bore sighted your gun but then your groups are all over the place one thing is your flinching but if there is any play no matter how slight in your scope rings or mounts that is the first place to check and retighten things down again then see how things go. Good luck BTW the Nikon scope you have is a top quality scope!!!
How can I control flinching? Would a lighter trigger pull help? Thanks
 

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Concentrate on a slow trigger squeeze. You shouldn't even know when the rifle will fire. Try taking a breath. letting it half out. Hold there and s-q-u-e-e-z-e the trigger. Also, make sure you are using some type of rest to keep the rifle steady.
 
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