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Just watched a YouTube video where a guy shoots his really nice stainless Security Six, and now I'm curious. How does the GP100 differ from the Security Six? How did Ruger customers react to replacing the Security Six with the GP100?

Is the GP100 better? If so, how?
 

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I have plenty of both but my personal preferance has a slight edge to the GP100 for shooting.

The GP100 has a crane lock, an improvement over the ejector rod lockup of the Six. My GP's tend to have slightly better, on average, double action pulls and I prefer the trigger return-latch spring of the GP over the circular spring of the Six. The GP's are easier to "tune up" too.

However the Six is a bit smaller and lighter, and plenty durable. I have no worries about any of mine wearing out in my lifetime.
 

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The GP100 is heavier in both frame and cylinder. The trigger group is a little tighter in design (though the old design was perfectly good) and the grips go over a stud rather then on the frame.

If you like a somewhat lighter gun -- go with the six series. If you want an easy shooting .357 go GP100.

Oh, Ruger is running out of parts to service the old Six series guns, so that may be a factor as well.

I have both a GP100 and a Speed Six. Both are excellent, but the GP100 will take a beating that I'm not confident my Speed Six could handle.
 

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The Speed Six can handle any beating you want to send its way. No worries in that department.

Ruger will no longer service Six Series guns. Numrich has a huge supply of parts and most likely purchased Rugers inventory.

My Security has one of the best triggers in both DA and SA of any of my revolvers including many of my S&W's. Not the original owner so don't know if this is factory or not.

Don't own a GP so I'll leave it at that. If you find a nice Six don't hesitate as the cat is out of the bag and they are very desirable.

 

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I have owned several of each, and I preferred the GP100 from the day it was released. I liked the front crane lock, the beefed up frame, the new grip peg and grips, and the removable front sight of the GP100. I currently own two GP100 revolvers and no security sixes. However, the speed-six still turns my head when I see one.:eek:
 

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I sort of liken those two revolvers to K frame vs L frame. The Security Six is more like a K frame mod.19 and the GP100 is like a mod.686. Your preference will depend on weight and frame size. Both will outlast you in the long run. Personally, I get better groups with my GP100 but have had much smoother trigger pulls on every Security Six I've ever picked up.
 

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I have both SS (2) and a 4" GP and I agree with most of the above.

Both are damn strong but the prize of the strongest 4" 357M you can buy is the GP.

Yes, Ruger has formally ended support for the Security/Speed products. I mean they've been discontinued for, what, 25 years. I can't blame them.

As far as shooting them, I have Hogue grips on my 2.75" SS and my 4" GP, then factory on my 6" SS. The bigger GP is just easier to shoot. The weight helps and the grip is bigger.

The Security Six was Ruger's cop gun at the time. It was replaced by the GP, bigger, stronger, newer. But that was right when the 'wonder nines' came out. So all revolver sales basically failed in the LEO market.

I've always thought of the GP as a finely made tank. You'll never wear it out and when its empty it will make a damn good club.
 

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Both are excellent, but the GP100 will take a beating that I'm not confident my Speed Six could handle.
Really ?????

I would have thought it would be the other way around
Really????

Why would you think that a smaller framed revolver, with a smaller cylinder with thinner walls, and lacking of an additional lock-up security measure would be more durable than a larger revolver with a heftier cylinder and extra lock-up security?

Pretty straight forward, the GP100 is the tougher built and designed of the two. Does that matter to you? Eh, maybe. Are you looking for a lightweight belt gun that won't get shot much? The Six will be fine. Are you looking for a high volume revolver, then the GP will serve you better.

The K frame vs. L frame comparison is apt, and I'll echo that by saying it's kinda like the difference in an J frame 60 and an SP101. I'm not terribly old, and I have "shot loose" a Smith 60 myself. I have multiple SP's with similar round counts that aren't even getting winded yet.
 

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As far as which is tougher; all you have to do is pick them up and look at them to answer that. The GP is heavier and the cylinder walls are thinker.

In any event;
I sure would NOT want to be the guy who had to shoot each one until failure to answer the question. In both cases that would take a long friggin time.
 

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Like was said, if you have pockets deep enough to wear out a Six then you really don't have to worry about too much else.......the everage gun owner doesn't shoot enough to wear out a Taurus let alone any kind of Ruger revolver.

The Six was aimed 100% squarely at the law enforcement market, to directly compete with the S&W K-frame .357 in the early 1970's. Civilian sales were a "bonus", Bill Ruger wanted the LE market, a tougher gun at a lower price with less parts to fail, pretty simple business equation. Colt had pretty much priced themselves out of the LE market by the 1970's. The LE market it very lucrative, PD's and state and federal agencies buy tens of thousands of guns, Ruger wanted a piece of that. The US military even purchased .38 Service and Speed Sixes, the US Army CID carried snub Speed Sixes for years.

It was probably no coincidence that the GP100 followed the S&W L-frame by only 4 years, people think "beefier is better" so Ruger was both able to make the GP100 for less than the Six by changing production techniques, make the frame more "L-frame like" and also add the crane lock. But like was said by 1986 most LE agencies didn't care about revolvers any more and sales of the GP primarily went to civilians, Corrections agencies and security companies, although plenty of cops carried them well into the 90's and beyond.

I have a few Sixes that have "yoke shake" as in the yoke assembly moves a bit fore and aft, also a few with loose crane lockup from probably decades of having the cylinder slammed open and shut, as well as variance in manufacture fitting. The GP all but eliminates yoke shake and loose crane lockup unless the gun has been outright abused as in "Hollywood flipping" or other mistreatment.

I noticed that not all of my GP's respond well to lighter springs, in fact most of mine seem to want to stay stock weight or maybe just a bit below. I have tried light springs in some of my GP and it made the action feel terrible. In fact one of my best shooting GP's has heavier than stock springs.......I put the spring that came in my .22 SP101 in it, along with a SRH .454 heavier trigger latch spring that I had.......put them in and the gun has a heavy but smooooth DA pull and is an excellent shooter, go figure. I may be the only guy on Earth who went heavier with GP springs and was more satisfied. The gun is a beat up and ugly but solid GP that I use solely for HD and winter carry, at least I know that the gun will fire and the trigger will return if I ever need it.
 

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Gofer which ever comes up first at a bargain. Last year I was waiting for a deal on a GP and a single six. While searching GunBroker, I saw a single six ad for $225 and no bids. Called up photos and it was a 4" blue Security Six mislabeled. I was the only bidder and stopped the GP search. With the reputation of both, I was willing to buy either. I shoot the Security often without fear of it falling apart and willing to trust my life with it. I'm not one to collect several revolvers of the same CF caliber, but I already had a S&W 64 and just wanted the .357 option.
Good luck in the search for either one.
 

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I love red ramp front sights, and I love fixed sight revolvers.......so after I have my gunsmith mount a red ramp front blade on one of my favorite Service Sixes it will be about the perfect revolver for me. Then I'll have the same done to a GP100.
 

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I like the looks and the feel of the security six better, but the GP is a stronger gun. I had a security six that I shot heavy .357 loads through and it did eventually go out of time. I have no worries of this happening with my GP100.
 

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I have 2 GP's, both 6" barrel
and a SS, 2.75" barrel

overall the GP is better, bigger, newer
but the SS can still handle magnum loads and shoot well
for a carry gun, i would choose the SS, bc its smaller
for a range gun or hunting handgun, i would choose the GP, bc its bigger and more accurate.
but either is a great revolver, thats why i have both! :D
 

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I have plenty of both but my personal preferance has a slight edge to the GP100 for shooting.

The GP100 has a crane lock, an improvement over the ejector rod lockup of the Six. My GP's tend to have slightly better, on average, double action pulls and I prefer the trigger return-latch spring of the GP over the circular spring of the Six. The GP's are easier to "tune up" too.

However the Six is a bit smaller and lighter, and plenty durable. I have no worries about any of mine wearing out in my lifetime.
The GP100 is heavier in both frame and cylinder. The trigger group is a little tighter in design (though the old design was perfectly good) and the grips go over a stud rather then on the frame.

If you like a somewhat lighter gun -- go with the six series. If you want an easy shooting .357 go GP100.

Oh, Ruger is running out of parts to service the old Six series guns, so that may be a factor as well.

I have both a GP100 and a Speed Six. Both are excellent, but the GP100 will take a beating that I'm not confident my Speed Six could handle.
I've owned seven (7) GP100's and one (1) Security-Six...the GP's are built heavier and the triggers are nicer...plus Ruger still makes parts for the GP!
 

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I read often, rarely post, but I am a huge fan of Ruger revolvers, have accumulated many over the decades, so thought I would chime in with my opinions on their DA 357s.

They are all very robust compared to other makes. Even the small frame SP101 is very durable, with a smaller frame than the Six Series models. The stainless 3 and 1/16th inch SP101 is one of my favorite carries. Small, durable, and that barrel length captures more of the 357 round's awesome potential than the 2.25" version.

I own many of the variants of the GP100 and the Six Series models. If I could only have one, I'd chose a Six series over a GP or SP, any day, but there are so many variants, some are better for some things than others.

If you are all about the biggest and strongest, get a Redhawk in 357. However, I doubt anyone on this board, or their kids or grand-kids, will ever wear out a medium frame Six Series or a slightly larger GP100.

Since they are both plenty durable, it is interesting to look at it by barrel length, weight, balance, accuracy, sites. I prefer fixed sites on revolvers 4 inches and under, as long as they are well regulated from the factory, and lighter weight, as these are meant to be carried. As a result, the lighter medium frame 4" Service Six & Speed Six are better choices for me OWB. There is a half lug 4" fixed site GP variant, but it is heavier than a Service Six, a little harder to carry. Below that length, the round butt fixed site Speed Six is a great 6 round IWB carry. The stainless Speed Six shorty has to be one of my favorite guns ever made.

The 3 inch SP is a nice fixed site IWB carry too, but less durable (though still very strong), and holds 5 rather than 6. There is a fixed site 3 inch GP, but it is bulkier with no extra rounds, and comes with that stupid large Hogue grip no one would ever CC.

If you like adj sites on a 4", the Security Six & GP100 are solid choices, though the medium frame Six has a nice weight advantage. The full lug GP does have a little less recoil. They both balance fairly well.

In the 6 inch group, none have fixed sites and carry weight is not likely to be as big an issue, as less likely to be a carry gun. That said, I find the full lug GP100 in 6 inches is very front heavy, does not balance well. It is a good looking gun, but the combo of the full underlug and small grip stub pushes the weight forward. The 6 inch medium frame Security Six with the half underlug balances great, shoots great. There are half lug 6 inch GP100s, but many were made early, late 80s, early 90s, so they are getting harder to find. They are lighter, balance better, and are really nice 6 inch choices IMO.

I'm not worried about parts, as these things never break, and even if they do, as another poster pointed out, Numrich has them.

Then there is the issue of scarcity/collectibility, if it matters to you. GPs and SPs are still made, Sixes have not been for quite some time. A lot were made, but nice ones are getting harder and harder to find, especially more rare variants, like the 9mm Speed Six Shorty. While Sixes can still often be bought for less than a new GP, that will gradually change over time as demand grows, and supply becomes more and more scarce.

I wouldn't own most all of them if I didn't like them, but if I could only chose one, it would probably be a stainless Service or Speed Six.

That is my 2 cents, or what it is worth.
 

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I keep seeing posts where people say the Security-Six is lighter than the GP100 …. Not true, assuming you compare like types and barrel lengths. I have a 4" stainless 1/2 lug Security Six that weighs exactly one ounce more than my full lug stainless 4" GP100. If the Security-Six had a full lug, you could add another ounce or two. Current production GP100s have a 4.2" barrel to comply with Canadian laws, which does add a little weight, making the two guns pretty equal in weight.

That said, GP100s "feel" heavier because of weight distribution. When Ruger designed the GP100, they used a grip stud instead of a full grip frame … way less metal. This allowed a lot more metal to be distributed in areas that beef up strength such as the cylinder, top strap and frame, yet the overall weight stayed much the same. It also makes a GP100 feel "top heavy" in comparison which is why many people think the GP100 is heavier.

The GP100 was not intended to replace the Security-Six, rather it was to provide another option, much like S&W did with their K and L frame DA revolvers. Production started in 1986 with the GP100, however Security-Six production continued until 1988 when sales finally dropped to a point where they were no longer profitable. So for 2 years and several thousand guns, both were in production.

There are many similarities between the two models and there are also many differences. The most notable differences are the grip stud versus a full grip frame, cylinder retention design, cylinder size, trigger spring design, plug-in front sight, and cylinder latch design.

My preference is a GP100 because it is just a much stronger and better design in all respects. That doesn't mean a Security-Six is a bad gun, it just means a GP100 is better ….. at least in my opinion.
 

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Once again, Iowegan speaks with lots of wisdom. I get a similar experience when comparing a stainless steel single six to a blued steel single six. The stainless steel model is heavier because the grip frame is steel compared to the blued steel revolver which uses an aluminum grip frame. However, the blued steel single six balances differently and feels more muzzle heavy. I know, I digressed here, but what Iowegan said made me think of it.:eek:
 
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