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Something else I just thought of, what kind of brass are you using? If you are using different kinds of range brass, I have noticed a big difference in case length when it comes to 9mm brass. If your cases are different lengths, this will change your crimp, and could be a factor in why some cartridges fail. I use range brass, but have had my best results when I sort by headstamp. I also measure a new batch of brass after sizing. I don’t trim them all to the same length because that is too much work for cheap and easy 9mm brass. What I do is discard any that are too short or too long. Hope this helps!
 

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To test my rounds I use an EGW seven hole case gauge.

They run about $20 and work quite well.

Since I'm running 9mm and 45 ACP in multiple firearms the case gauge is the best way to make sure the rounds will fit in all my guns.
 

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When hubby was still reloading he always used a case gauge. Well, FINE.........for the gauge. But not fine for my S&W Model 10-5! It has really tight chambers - all 6 of them. So every time hubby made a new batch of .38 specials for me I did the plunk test with every single round. This was after they all went in the case gauge with no problem at all. I also sat every round on a flat surface to test for high primers because that gun would lock up tight if even one of the primers was a teeny bit high!

The ones that were too fat and/or primers to high for that gun went in a separate box for other revolvers that would shoot them with no problem.
 

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I’ve had the same problem w/both 9mm& 45acp, turned out to be related to the brass, I traced brass back to a mixed once fired brass purchase, called vendor, turned out that some brass had been fired thru SMG then roll sized w/ table roller, I could resize on Dillon SDB however brass would “return” to oversized SMG chamber spec’s, No, they wouldn’t “plunk”.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
All of this amazing help is making me feel guilty that I'm too busy right now to try it all and report back the results! But it was very interesting that I googled "plunk test" to learn more. Ended up on Youtube and the first video I watched was a guy with a CZ describing exactly what was happening to me! This was encouraging because I realize I'm not the idiot that I think.... He said that CZs are notorious needing smaller COL and that I needed to determine for the CZ the length for that particular barrel. I can't wait to load some more and go test. I will report back as soon as I can!
 

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All of this amazing help is making me feel guilty that I'm too busy right now to try it all and report back the results! But it was very interesting that I googled "plunk test" to learn more. Ended up on Youtube and the first video I watched was a guy with a CZ describing exactly what was happening to me! This was encouraging because I realize I'm not the idiot that I think.... He said that CZs are notorious needing smaller COL and that I needed to determine for the CZ the length for that particular barrel. I can't wait to load some more and go test. I will report back as soon as I can!
Now that you have had a crash course on the "Plunk Test" it will be your best friend when loading for your gun. Like I said the loading manuals give you a generic length to load to but your barrel on your gun is the final word on what length to load any type of bullet to. Keep us posted on your progress as you load more.
 

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I had a similar issue with .45 auto. I was noticing that there was a slight bulge in the side of the case and the crimp was inconsistent. I bought a trim die and a shell holder extension and I started running the finished rounds in the trim die. Occasionally I would feel some resistance and that meant I was taking the bulge out and I would also see some consistency in the finished ends of the cases I assume had to do with slight variations in the length of the cases. It seemed to have stopped my feeding issues. You can also file back any excess length of the cases before you load them with the trim die. The bottom line is this helped me find and fix problems that were not plainly visible.

I found it easier to just run the loaded cases into the trim die to confirm the cases were completely round and not deformed during the loading process. Keep in mind you are dealing with loaded ammo so use caution ad think it through before proceeding.

kwg
 

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Volofish,
Listen to these fellows regarding the plunk test for 9mm auto-loaders, especially a CZ. They have shorter chambers than most pistols. They are designed around the bullets available in Europe. To do the plunk test correctly you'll need a fired case and the bullet that you intend to use. Remove the barrel from the pistol and with the bullet partially seated in the fired case push the bullet in the case as far as it will go. This will seat the bullet up against the lands. Do this a few times and take measurements each time. It should be very consistent. If you have one that is long that means it was held by lands and was pulled from the case slightly. Disregard an outlier if that happens. Take an average OAL measurement for that bullet/case and subtract 0.015". The result yields your OAL for that combination. You now have a safety factor built in.
Another fact about the 9mm round is that you must select the correct powder. You have to make sure you don't compress a fast burning powder. Use only published data from reliable sources that have pressure tested recipes. With the small case, an increase of 0.1 grain in charge weight can cause a dangerous pressure spike. If your powder is not listed for the 9mm Luger don't use it.
Also, the 9mm case is tapered and needs to be crimped accordingly. I never use a Lee FC die for 9mm. Some folks do use it successfully, but it is not the best option in my opinion. I love them for .38 sp, 41 mag, 45 colt. With the tapered chamber the use of the factory crimp die can bulge the case slightly if too much crimp is applied. This situation could possibly lead to contact with the chamber at the bulge restricting full case support within the chamber, and potentially cause chambering problems.
There are good taper crimp dies available. I personally use a Redding TCD that I bought years ago and it works great, but there are other brands capable of giving good results too.
I'm not trying to discourage you in the least. I only want to keep you safe and share what I have learned. The 9mm is a great little cartridge. It just takes a bit of understanding its requirements and characteristics.
Good luck to you and have fun with it.
 

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A lot of semi-autos do not like reloads. You might find your next batch of reloads goes through it like corn through a goose. Those guns are picky.
 

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A lot of semi-autos do not like reloads. You might find your next batch of reloads goes through it like corn through a goose. Those guns are picky.
That's funny!

I've got a bunch of semi-autos that have never seen a factory load. They all work fine. No action type likes bad reloads.

Many people don't take the time to figure out why their firearm won't work with the loads. It's the little things that matter.
 

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When a primer doesn't fire on the first strike but does fire on the second that is the classic sign that the primer was not fully seated in the primer pocket .
Seat the primers untill they hit bottom and stop ! If you don't , the first hammer blow will finish pushing the primer into the bottom of the pocket, the next strike...it fires because it is now fully seated .
Don't call this "light strikes"...it ain't ... it's a failure to fully seat the primer...
Seat them untill they hit bottom and can go in no more ...simple fix.
Gary
 

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That's funny!

I've got a bunch of semi-autos that have never seen a factory load. They all work fine. No action type likes bad reloads.

Many people don't take the time to figure out why their firearm won't work with the loads. It's the little things that matter.
I haven't bought any factory ammo for a while and my semi-autos aren't giving me any problems, at least not anymore. If you have a problem you have to investigate why it's happening and correct the problem. I would trust my reloads before factory ammo now.
 

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I was having trouble with failure to chamber. I was using 124g copper plated extreme projectiles. I was using universal 4.0 g they shot from a colt defender 4 in barrel. when i got home I check the COL it was short, made a note for the next reload. they shot fine out of my Springfield Armory range officer. Each gun has it differences
 

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I was having trouble with failure to chamber. I was using 124g copper plated extreme projectiles. I was using universal 4.0 g they shot from a colt defender 4 in barrel. when i got home I check the COL it was short, made a note for the next reload. they shot fine out of my Springfield Armory range officer. Each gun has it differences
I've checked length on 9mm cases quite a few times and have found some once fired factory brass to to be less than minimum. Semi autos tend to have long firing pins to make up for that and some semi autos have strong enough extractors to headspace on the extractor. Since you're shooting a CZ I expect your problem is related to for high primers.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Ok, sorry it took so long to get back. For any future reloader with the same problem. I did the plunk test and needed to shorten the OAL. I slightly loaded below the min charge and worked like a charm! I’m so happy! I can’t speak for other firearms but my CZ needs shorter ammo. I hope this helps someone!
145572
 

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Ok, sorry it took so long to get back. For any future reloader with the same problem. I did the plunk test and needed to shorten the OAL. I slightly loaded below the min charge and worked like a charm! I’m so happy! I can’t speak for other firearms but my CZ needs shorter ammo. I hope this helps someone! View attachment 145572
Glad to hear you have your issues worked out. Now that you have learned to do the plunk test make it your friend. Anytime you load for a different gun or load a different bullet go back to the plunk test to determine the correct COL for your gun and bullet. Stay safe and shoot straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Glad to hear you have your issues worked out. Now that you have learned to do the plunk test make it your friend. Anytime you load for a different gun or load a different bullet go back to the plunk test to determine the correct COL for your gun and bullet. Stay safe and shoot straight.
Yes, I like figuring things out (after I get over the frustration) I was surprised how much I had to reduce the COL. I’m using lead round nose bullets. I think I’ll try some semi-wadcutters next. Thanks for your help
 

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Glad to hear you have your issues worked out. Now that you have learned to do the plunk test make it your friend. Anytime you load for a different gun or load a different bullet go back to the plunk test to determine the correct COL for your gun and bullet. Stay safe and shoot straight.
bubba’s big on the “plunk test” as am I........there’s nothing extra to buy and it will guarantee that your load will fit your specific pistol. Glad you got a handle on it.
 
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