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I want to sell some "once fired" brass and wanted to know if it is supposed to be sorted by "Headstamp and Caliber" or is just sorted by Caliber with mixed Headstamp ok.

Thanks
 

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All the times I've bought "once fired" brass it's been mixed head stamps and I can't really recall seeing used brass for sale that was stamp sorted.
The vast majority of reloading I do is plinking rounds and my shooting level isn't up to point of noticing effects different cases may or may not make in accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just looked on the local Armslist and it confirms what you replied.

Seems like the buyers want once-fired brass in the correct caliber at a good price and the sellers just note that the brass has mixed Headstock.

Thanks for your reply John
 

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I want to sell some "once fired" brass and wanted to know if it is supposed to be sorted by "Headstamp and Caliber" or is just sorted by Caliber with mixed Headstamp ok.

Thanks
Whichever you like. Some I buy is all one head stamp, usually Lake City from military ranges, most is mixed. I have rarely bought "mixed brass" that was all kinds of calibers, but it was really cheap. Plus it had .45 LC that I never find anywhere. :)

Jeff
 

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You don't mention what kind of "once fired" brass you are selling. If it is pistol brass, in common calibers, that is mostly range or plinking brass, most guys don't care if it is mixed.

Rifle brass can be different. AR brass, most won't care. Most other rifle brass, guys will want like headstamps
 

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If you didn't shoot it when new, how do you know you are buying once-fired brass?

I reload. A lot.
Some of them multiple times until the web gets stressed or neck cracks.
And I try to keep good records. Rounds separated by head stamp and number of times reloaded. And the obvious reload data. Mark everything with a sharpie.
If you put several prepped cases in a tumbler with the same head stamp and different histories and polish them, very few people can tell any difference. Unless the rims are banged up from multiple semi-auto eject cycles.
Not all brass is manufactured the same. Especially military brass. Brass wall thickness, web thickness and design.
Each one creating slightly different chamber pressures and speeds with the same powder charge because of it.
Pain in the butt when using a bolt gun for long distance accuracy.
If I'm buying brass for reloading, for consistency, they all have to be the same head stamp.
2 cents. Or a nickel.
 

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ChooseWisely said:If you put several prepped cases in a tumbler with the same head stamp and different histories and polish them, very few people can tell any difference.
I use the Thumbler's Tumbler, which has two drums, each holds fifty cases, or one box. Easy to keep track of the case histories that way. I dump one box of empties into a drum, and place the empty cartridge box on the shelf directly above that drum as its on the tumbler.


Bob Wright
 

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I've bought and have been given mixed brass for various calibers of casings. Before I reload I do sort the brass in reference to the manufacturer, like was previously mentioned different manufacturers of the same caliber have different internal dimensions. The exception would be for just plinking ammo.
 

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I would say,for me, it depends on whether it's a bottle neck or straight wall cartridge. I don't worry about volume differences in straight wall cartridges as much as with bottle neck rifle cartridges in other word similar to the 2 posts above.
 

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I keep track/sort my rifle brass and rimmed handgun cases, but autos...no way.

Can't say as I ever seen bulk auto brass (fired) really 'sorted'. Even if from a homogenous range they likely won't be from the same batch.

The only caution/caveat I would add to the OP is that if it's .45 ACP brass, beware of small primer vs. large primer mixing.

THAT is a pain in the butt to sort out!

(Don't ask me how I know!) ;)
 

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It really depends what you're buying for, and what you're trying to sell.

You can move big batches of mixed brass a lot easier, but you can demand a better price for sorted brass.

I personally don't buy mixed headstamp mixed bulk brass, unless I know there's a good volume of the brass that I want in the mix, and then I'll cull out what I want and resell the rest.

I do SELL mixed headstamp brass - in general I'll have a thousand or more pieces of brass that I want, but every now and again, I'll get a few boxes here and there of factory stuff that doesn't match my batches. I'll save it up in buckets until I get a decent volume, then sell it off.

What kind you're selling also dictates what the market will tolerate. Pistol brass, 223rem, x39 and 308win are very easy to sell as mixed brass. It's almost impossible to sell mixed 6.5-284win brass, and you'll get a LOT less value out of it compared to selling sorted. Largely, if you're talking about bulk shooting with a minimal expectation for precision, you can sell it as mixed very well. If you're talking about precision grade brass meant for precision loading, it's more valuable to sell it as sorted.
 
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