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I don't think you have a problem with the latch. I think you have a timing problem that causing the latch to delay in releasing.

You didn't say, but as a cheap attempt, remove the trigger group and make sure it's clean and that there isn't so much crud that it's throwing off the timing. Re-lube with a very light oil or light spray, depending on your style.

If you bought the gun new, and know how solid SS are, I suspect somebody has messed with innards. Maybe by polishing too much.

I wouldn't remove any material from the latch that engages the cylinder. Doing so will make the 'lock up' more sloppy than it is.
 

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I don't think you have a problem with the latch. I think you have a timing problem that causing the latch to delay in releasing.

You didn't say, but as a cheap attempt, remove the trigger group and make sure it's clean and that there isn't so much crud that it's throwing off the timing. Re-lube with a very light oil or light spray, depending on your style.

If you bought the gun new, and know how solid SS are, I suspect somebody has messed with innards. Maybe by polishing too much.

I wouldn't remove any material from the latch that engages the cylinder. Doing so will make the 'lock up' more sloppy than it is.
Thank you for the reply, Spike12. Here's what I can share:
- The revolver appears to be an old police service pistol, but new to me.
- I've stripped, cleaned, and lubed the gun.
- The hitch occurs after the bolt has cleared the cylinder notch.
- The hitch is present even when the following parts are removed from the gun: Hammer spring, Hammer, cylinder and yoke.
- The hitch goes away completely when the cylinder latch is removed, and the gun is otherwise completely reassembled.

That's what's brought me to deciding that I need to polish portions of the latch, but I don't want to "fix" things that don't need fixing, and I was hoping that some folks might have some insight into which parts of the cylinder latch would benefit the most from smoothing and which parts I should stay away from touching. Thanks!

I know my way around a Model 10, but this is the first time I've been responsible for a Ruger - so I have a lot to learn.
 

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This is really difficult w/o watching or feeling what's happening. So I can only offer a broad, lack of focus, answer.

A used LEO gun can sometimes be really used or really not used.

Examine each part for burrs and/or excessive slop on their pins. It might be that your gun has been used so much that there is now enough play to cause your problem.

Do any of the parts in the trigger group show to be worked on?
 

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If you can't understand the action well enough to know where to polish the cylinder latch (locking bolt), the gunsmithing is best left to someone else. The movement of the latch is easy to understand - how it interacts with the trigger and the plunger, it's all there in front of you. The bearing surfaces are all readily apparent.

The way you have described the "hitch" in your action, and its timing within the action cycle, there is no amount of polishing which will fix this issue.

The "dry fire thousands of times" bunk is exactly that - bunk. Letting rough surfaces work across eachother will smooth out with use, but it can also let a burr cut a gouge in another part, and wastes a buttload of time. Polish it up by hand. And again - your issue isn't simply rough surfaces. It's either a misunderstanding of how your revolver works, or a mis-fit or malfunctioning part within the lockwork. Dry firing isn't going to smooth out a 30yr old revolver which has already been broken in.

Never in the history of gunsmithing has a professional gunsmith done an action job sitting in front of their TV simply dry firing the weapon...
 
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