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What causes the plum color? I have an older semi auto that has the plum color on the frame and not the slide.
 

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I don't think I have ever seen one that "plum".
Very nice revolver.
 

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I'm sure there's a scientific explanation for it, but I don't know what it is. I have a plum P7 that I'm very fond of.
 

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I've heard that it has to do with the silicone content in Ruger's steel alloys for their blue guns. I've never seen it before on a DA Ruger, but it's pretty common on blued Blackhawks. I have not seen it on Ruger rifles or .22 autopistols, but I could have just missed seeing any that were affected.

This is a big reason why I buy stainless Rugers!

You can have the gun plated, probably in hard chrome. If well done, it will closely resemble stainless. But be sure to know who's doing it and be familiar wth their reputation.

Unless the gun has great sentimental value, I'd just sell it to someone who isn't bothered by the color and put that money into a good stainless example or a GP-100. But most people will chisel you on price because of the plum color and you'll take a beating. May be cheaper to have a competent house plate it, and the gun is a known quantity to you. You know where it shoots, with which ammo, and the size is handy.

On balance, if you have adequate funds, I think I'd plate it. It isn't cost effective, but it will get you a fine gun. Money is just money. A good gun that you really like is something more.

P.S. Just saw the post above this , about the P-7. If that's a H-K gun, yes, I have seen bad blue jobs on Euro arms and on many Remington products, like M-700 bolt handles. Ruger supposedly uses silicone additives to avoid the parts sticking in the molds. Most other guns with plum blue jobs are still machined, not cast. In those cases, I've heard that having the bluing salts at the wrong temp. is a factor. I once sold a very fine Sako Finnbear rifle because the receiver turned plum.
 

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Ruger Tinkerer
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I've heard that it has to do with the silicone content in Ruger's steel alloys for their blue guns. I've never seen it before on a DA Ruger, but it's pretty common on blued Blackhawks. I have not seen it on Ruger rifles or .22 autopistols, but I could have just missed seeing any that were affected.

This is a big reason why I buy stainless Rugers!

You can have the gun plated, probably in hard chrome. If well done, it will closely resemble stainless. But be sure to know who's doing it and be familiar wth their reputation.

Unless the gun has great sentimental value, I'd just sell it to someone who isn't bothered by the color and put that money into a good stainless example or a GP-100. But most people will chisel you on price because of the plum color and you'll take a beating. May be cheaper to have a competent house plate it, and the gun is a known quantity to you. You know where it shoots, with which ammo, and the size is handy.

On balance, if you have adequate funds, I think I'd plate it. It isn't cost effective, but it will get you a fine gun. Money is just money. A good gun that you really like is something more.
YIKES!:eek:

There are many serious Ruger collectors who love the plum and pay a premium for it. The plum is a "Ruger thing" and if you don't like it that's OK - sell it for a lot of money to the guys who dig it and buy something else. But I have a hunch the OP knows this and is showing off his pretty plum Six!
 

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Difference in color was the difference in putting the cast parts into the same bluing as the cylinders and barrels. Because the makeup of the steel is different the plum came out of the blue over time. I have a pinto myself, it's a mid-year '73 New Model Blackhawk .357. It's called a "pinto". It always gets attention, to the point last time I was shooting it one of the guys asked why I didn't put it up in a display...:eek:



 

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Just minding my business
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Dan Wesson revolvers are famous for this as well. And as stated, it's the difference in the metal parts going into the same bluing process. Dan Wesson frames will go 'purple' before the cylinders and barrel shrouds.
 

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My P95 also has the plum tint to it, and I'm a-okay with it!
 

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I was kind of hoping my speed six I recently got shipped would be "plumming" too but oddly enough it's more a deep blue. Strange mine was made in 82 and it doesn't show any sign of the phenomenon so often seen in vintage Ruger's.
 

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Armybrat - if you don't like the color, I'll sure take it off your hands - ;)
A good lookin Service Six is way up there on my list.
 
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