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Sight Shooting or Point Shooting. How Do You Train?

  • Sight Shooting Only for Self Defense

    Votes: 37 10.3%
  • Point Shooting Only for Self Defense

    Votes: 23 6.4%
  • I Believe In & Practice Both

    Votes: 299 83.3%

  • Total voters
    359
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My defense pistol drills begin with point shooting art arms length from target moving backwards and then at about 10 feet, I shoot using the front sight.

To be specific, I pull the pistol from holster to stomach level and fire continuously at a target about 3 feet in front of moving backwards until I reach about ten feet. Once there, I replace magazine and shoot double and triple taps using the front sight.

This drill is repeated for about ten 15-round magazines. Afterwards, I sight shoot at targets from 7 yards to 15 yards for another ten magazines. Beyond that, I replace my pistols with my Ruger9 PC Carbine.
 

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The big problem is each person will have a different understanding of what "sighted shooting" or "point shooting" is. More than 2 decades ago, I got into a discussion with a "pointing shooting" disciple. It was only after a while that he was talking about the techniques that were introduced by Fairbairn & Sykes to the Shanghai Police Department.

But when the other guy insisted that the "high" standards Fairbairn and Sykes imposed onto the Shanghai PD are just as applicable nowadays; I had to point out that their standard was something like a 50% hit on a man-sized target at 10-feet (IIRC). Basically, a standard that would get any current US agency sued because it allows for a 50% hit rate in qualifications at such a close range.

I personally prefer to use the term "hard sight focus" to "soft sight focus". In this case, I advocate training and practicing the use of both depending on the situation (ie: distance).
 

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I practice both at 21 - 30 feet because when carrying concealed and being in a situation where you have to shoot every second counts and you may not have any time to sight and aim. You all know muscle training is important and you should be able to shoot either way in a crunch. Because I wear glasses I also practice with regular eye protection not prescription so I can shoot as well without my glasses.
 

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Grand Inquisitor
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Got taught point shooting with an AR and then began practicing it with a revolver. Good first-shot tactic with a snub, the theory being that the sound and flash buy you a second for a second shot.
 

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Sky Marshal
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I practice point shooting off the draw with the gun at waist level, before it's brought up and pushed out. Or with the gun at chest level, but held in against the body with both hands. Practice distance is about 3-10 ft. Further than that, I should be able to get the gun up and the sights on. I'd prefer to see the sights, or at least look along the top of the gun for aiming.
 

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Depends...

Thirty feet and under, point shooting. Thirty-one feet and more, sighted shooting. Of course, this does depend upon the threats that are extant. Sometimes, throwing a bit of metal downrange is necessary to keep their heads down. Then, take out the trash as time permits...

OldPaladin1949
 

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I used to hunt when I was younger. The ability to get on target while experiencing an adrenaline rush was my way of "training" for bad guys. Not exactly the same but close. I'm sure I will catch a ration of s#$% for saying this but whatever.
 

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Speed/short distance, point shooting. Greater distance than point shooting proficiency, sighted shooting. Simple.
 

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Forlorn Hope
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Up until a few years ago, I exclusively practiced sight shooting, and felt that point shooting was impracticable and dangerous. It has only been since I sicked up my LC9s that I discovered that the grip angles on other guns I had used were not in line with my natural point of aim. This was also why I would ALWAYS need to line up my sights after bringing up a pistol to aim. With the way the LC9 rests in my hand, I noticed that the sights were nearly ALWAYS aligned when I drew the pistol. I have now taken to point shooting (and practicing with a laser sight) and I can actually hit things (at defensive ranges at least). I'm sure that with extensive practice, I would have been able to learn the point of aim with other pistols, but to have it come naturally is so gratifying.

 

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Here is an interesting report re; defensive pistol shooting. Copied from the Seecamp owners manual, via an American Handgunner article from several years back.


 

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I haven't read all of the post so this may have been mentioned or may not even apply but this thread brings to mind Wyatt Earps quote about being slow in a hurry. I have been shooting for over 50 yrs and was taught and passed down to be able to consistently hit a paper plate at ten yards for self defense with what ever method works for you. Actually 5-7 yds (5-5-5) but we shoot steel in my 70 yd backyard range so I had to modify it to 10.:) Just kidding we practice that drill on paper plates. I have to admit I spend a lot more time sight shooting 8 sq in steel plates (there is also a man size target at the end of the range) anywhere from 10-50 yards depending on the pistol. But since my macular degeneration went wet in my dominant eye one might argue all of my shooting is point shooting. My wife is a naturally good shot. She doesn't practice at all but when I shame her in to shooting a few rounds she can put them all on the paper. That is sight shooting but when I first taught her to shoot defensively 30 yrs ago. I initially taught her to hold the pistol with both hands close to her chest and point her body because she was afraid of the recoil, not aiming with her dominant eye, plus less chance of not dropping the pistol or worse having it taken away from her etc...
I think in a stressful life threatening situation most people would be point shooting. I like to think I would do well if were in that situation. I have made some amazing shoots off handed without thinking about it that I either couldn't duplicate or would have a hard time duplicating sight shooting. That would make a good thread subject.:) My most amazing accidental offhanded shots.
Couple of yrs old picture of the range:
 

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I’m probably late to the party here, but just saw this thread. for 30 yrs, I carried a snub 38 Special, and because of my job I had to be good. So I practiced and practice point shooting in every imaginable postion,,,,ou to 7 yards........I shot at least three times a week, and felt I was pretty good, In fact I removed the sights from my revolver so it drew smoother.

Now that I am retired I still love to practice point shooting with all my handguns,,, it’s fun.

recently, I was surprised,,,to find that a Remington R51 I got a few months ago is one of the most natural ‘pointers’ I have ever shot,,, It is great....
 

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Point Shooting/Instinct shooting can be more accurate. You have to concentrate, or I did when starting. The more you concentrate the easier it will become. Lots of practice even to the point of wearing out a gun. One reason I got into reloading 50 years ago.. if you get to where you can hit better at 50 yards or as good as sighting by point shooting you are good really good. Not sure I cn hit apaper plate now. Need lots of practice. The sights on most guns I have tried in the last few years are not on target and not sighted in at the factory it is evident especially fixed sights. I tried the .45. Cotl Vauero by sighing and it was two foot off I judge shooting small cedar sapplings. Went to pitn shootign and was a lot closer then concentrated and started shotting them n half two out of three times. .
 

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