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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please excuse the question but I really don't know lol I put a scope on my Mini 30 I'm using it for deer season First time sighting a scope the right way. I have a place to shoot thats flat, straight, but no back stop to speak of but it's also bow season here even though no one SHOULD BE on the land. I also have a place that has a down hill incline into a big pond bank . Can you get the same results shooting down as on the flat. Hope this makes sense but have always used iron sights but the eyes are going with age lol 'Thanks for any help
 

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That depends on the distances being spoken of and how far out you plan to zero the scope for (as well as bullet weight/load data).

If you're zeroing for 50 yards on flatland vs 50 yards downhill there may be a very slight difference due to round trajectory. Naturally this will be exaggerated the further the distance over the same two angles.

That said, if you zero at whatever particular distance on a negative slope you could easily adjust that zero up/down as necessary once you're familiar with the adjustments of your scope)
 

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When shooting up hill or down hill, there is less bullet drop, so you need to hold a bit lower when shooting up hill or downhill than if shooting over a flat field, assuming you sighted in on the flats. In other words, a rifle sighted in on the flats tends to shoot a bit high when shooting up hill or down hill because you've dialed in more elevation on the scope than you actually need. Thus, you hold a bit low.

If you sighted in shooting on a downhill range and move to the flats and shoot, then you''ll find your rifle shoots low, because you haven't dialed in enough elevation on the scope to compensate for the added bullet drop that happens over the flats. Now, you'll to hold a bit higher.

Now, all that is fine, but unless we are talking about sighting on the side of a very steep hill and/or shooting deer at very long distances, say 200 plus yards, you can rest easy because you'll still be within the killing zone of a deer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok thanks y'alland thanks for the sniper school zommygun I'm going to zero at 175 and going to be in a tree stand 762x39. I wasn't sure if it was going to be a big big difference this helped thanks
 

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At the distances that we normally shoot deer, the difference is not worth a hill of beans. Most deer are shot at a distance of 100 yards, or less. Unless where you plan to set up is synifigantly longer, aim where you normally would, and you will be successful......Robin
 
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