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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Like a lot folks I've used the little yellow dry wall anchors for snap caps for a long time with much success. Sure, they don't last forever, often you'll see the rim peeling off, but they're cheap enough to replace. Well, while practicing with my Single Six inside our home this morning I had a "first". After about 12 dry fires with some fresh anchors I went to eject them. Just sitting in my computer chair and ejecting them onto my lap...but only five came out. Looked to see if one had fallen onto the floor but nope. But there was one perfectly detached rim ejected.

So surely I thought I'd find the rest of the anchor in one of the cylinder chambers. Ran the ejector through all six chambers but nothing. Maybe I skipped one so before I took the cylinder out I checked with a flashlight, nothing to be seen. It took me a few seconds but then I thought "Nahhh" no way..

Ran a rod down from the muzzle and there it was, in the bore. Between a separating rim and that hard Single Six hammer strike it sent that anchor clear down the center of my barrel. I'm only sharing this stupid tale so that maybe it keeps someone from leaving one of these plastic plugs in the barrel and then God forbid shooting the gun with a live round. Lord knows what might have resulted.

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Thanks for posting. I would have never believed that could happen.
 

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That is interesting, I sure wouldn't have thought that would happen. I use those fairly regularly in my Smith & Wesson model 41 so I will have to be aware of that. As far as my Super Single Six revolver, Ruger says that they can be dry-fired without causing harm to the revolver, so that's what I do. If I ever break a firing pin, I will face it when it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From my perspective, it's not that hard to believe in hindsight. I mean, the hammer spring is STRONG. But to ya'lls point, I've used these anchors for a long time and this is the first time I've ever had a handgun actually propel the the anchor into the barrel. In consideration of the Ruger auto's, S&W revolvers, and other makes I dry fire, nothing has the hammer strike of this newer Single Six. Probably will never happen again but I really wanted to share it for obvious reasons.
 

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I've never had one split like that before. Good info if you ever fail to remove all of the drywall anchor snapcaps intact.
 

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Murphy's law strikes again. Thanks for the time and the post.
*I do not dry fire much but when I do I use wall anchors. I even sometimes use them to cycle a semi auto. Good to know that there is one more thing to consider when prepping a firearm after testing with anchors.
 

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IIRC, Ruger claims that the Single Six (and all of their other guns) can be dry fired without damage. The firing pin has a stop that allows it to go forward enough to strike the rim of the cartridge, but not far enough to hit the edge of the chamber.
But having the FP stop from hitting a piece of plastic is probably better for it than having the shoulder of the FP hit the steel of the frame. I use some kind of snap cap for anything more than a couple of clicks.
Thanks to OP for the warning.
 

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Like a lot folks I've used the little yellow dry wall anchors for snap caps for a long time with much success. Sure, they don't last forever, often you'll see the rim peeling off, but they're cheap enough to replace. Well, while practicing with my Single Six inside our home this morning I had a "first". After about 12 dry fires with some fresh anchors I went to eject them. Just sitting in my computer chair and ejecting them onto my lap...but only five came out. Looked to see if one had fallen onto the floor but nope. But there was one perfectly detached rim ejected.

So surely I thought I'd find the rest of the anchor in one of the cylinder chambers. Ran the ejector through all six chambers but nothing. Maybe I skipped one so before I took the cylinder out I checked with a flashlight, nothing to be seen. It took me a few seconds but then I thought "Nahhh" no way..

Ran a rod down from the muzzle and there it was, in the bore. Between a separating rim and that hard Single Six hammer strike it sent that anchor clear down the center of my barrel. I'm only sharing this stupid tale so that maybe it keeps someone from leaving one of these plastic plugs in the barrel and then God forbid shooting the gun with a live round. Lord knows what might have resulted.

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I've tried using the yellow drywall anchors, and my 17-2 chews them up in no time at all. Does anyone else think that you need to rotate the "snap cap" often? I have a couple of different brands of the red 22 LR snap caps, and they get chewed up as well, just not as fast.

I'd like to find some that are made out of a tougher rubber type material, that could absorb the firing pin impact and snap back into position, and not leave a divot. I've thought about trying a small "O" ring under the lip of the yellow anchors, but I never think of it when I'm actually in the hardware store. I think it may make them too thick to rotate the cylinder.

It's just my brain trying to find a solution. Any new or better ideas out there? Or a source for a more robust snap cap? My centerfire snap caps seem to have a rubber like primer area, and they last a lot longer. Of course rimfire firing pins are more like a chisel tip than most centerfire pins.

Thanks for the warning EricR! I would have probably just assumed the rest of the anchor had fallen through the cylinder at some point and was lost. Thinking about checking the barrel was your Guardian Angel watching over you. ;)
 

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I use Hillman yellow drywall anchors and get them by the large box, cheap, from Amazon. At least that is where I got the box I have. I do rotate each one after it has been dented.

I did do some dryfiring, loading the snap caps into a magazine and they fed well each time I racked the slide. It was really not helping me, though, because having to do that is too far from real shooting so now mostly all I use them for is after I'm done shooting, I put one in, close the slide and pull the trigger to uncock the mechanism. I suppose this is not absolutely necessary but my Browning 1911-22 has IN LARGE, BOLD, PRINT several places in the owners manual to never, ever, ever dry fire it. So I use that end of session process with the others also.

I still have enough .22lr ammo that I can actually shoot my .22lr handguns as much as I want, which in my case, with advanced age and advanced arthritis, is usually only 50 to at most 100 rounds per session - and that is after shooting whatever .380 gun I brought that day. If my ammo supply diminishes to the point where I don't feel I can practice with my .380 guns, I will be shooting more .22lr.
 
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