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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know what the angle is on a Single Six barrel forcing cone. I know the larger caliber Ruger revolvers have a 5 degree angle and attempting to recut it to 11 degrees will result in a compound angle or ruined barrel. I have an 80’s series Single Six and am thinking about cutting a 11 degree FC but if it is 5 degrees already I don’t want to screw it up.

Thanks,
LBS
 

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There's no advantage with an 11 deg cone in a 22 LR. The 11 deg cone works exceptionally well for 38 and 45 cal lead wad cutters and SWCs but the factory forcing cone is the best with round nose bullets. I have never seen 22 LR wad cutters or SWCs .... just round nose or hollow points with round noses.
 

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There's no advantage with an 11 deg cone in a 22 LR. The 11 deg cone works exceptionally well for 38 and 45 cal lead wad cutters and SWCs but the factory forcing cone is the best with round nose bullets. I have never seen 22 LR wad cutters or SWCs .... just round nose or hollow points with round noses.
Exactly what I needed to know. Thank you!!

LBS
 

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My Dad bought me this gun, my first handgun, when I was 13 years old. God only knows how many times its been fired and I haven’t shot it in years. Tonight I totally disassembled it for the first full cleaning in 40 years and found the forcing cone had lots of leading in it. I finally got it clean but thought recutting the cone may prevent it in the future. Of course if its another 40 years before it needs a total cleaning again I wont really care. LOL

LBS
 

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Long branch Setter, I guess that's why most people clean their guns after each shooting session.
 
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My Dad bought me this gun, my first handgun, when I was 13 years old. God only knows how many times its been fired and I haven’t shot it in years. Tonight I totally disassembled it for the first full cleaning in 40 years and found the forcing cone had lots of leading in it. I finally got it clean but thought recutting the cone may prevent it in the future. Of course if its another 40 years before it needs a total cleaning again I wont really care. LOL

LBS

maybe try to clean at least once a decade?
 
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Even if you did alter your forcing cone, I don’t think that would fix your problem. It has been my experience that leading in the forcing cone is caused by undersized bullets. Meaning your bullets are smaller than your throats, and gas escapes causing leading that gets deposited in the forcing cone. There are other possible causes, but it has been my experience, that small bullets are the primary culprit. Paco Kelly used to make a tool that could be used to change the diameter of .22lr rounds.
 

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They seem to shoot cleaner with plated or "washed" ammo. Mine seem to like Remington Golden Bullets well enough, but CCIs are better and more expensive. If it gave 40 years of service without a good cleaning, I wouldn't start altering the gun.

You might be surprised how many malfunctioning guns come in to a shop that need nothing more than a good cleaning. Easy money.
 

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Wheelguns, Just an FYI .... Every brand and model of 22 LR or 22 Mag revolver I've ever seen had .225" cylinder throats. Bullets range from .222" for match grade to as large as .224" for 22 Mag. When bullets get corroded, the diameter will increase even more. So, it's safe to say .... all 22 LR bullets that are not corroded are smaller in diameter than the cylinder throats. Why? 22 LRs develop 24,000 psi chamber pressure .... enough to force soft lead bullets to obturate (bump up in diameter) so they will get a tight seal in the bore. The diameter of the cylinder throat is the limiting factor for bullet expansion. 22 Mag bullets are jacketed and do not obturate but because they are .224", they need a slightly larger throat to prevent excessive chamber pressure from poking a larger bullet into a smaller hole.

What causes a forcing cone to get corrupted is simply a lack of preventative maintenance (cleaning). Powder and bullet residue will accumulate with each range trip and eventually will corrupt the forcing cone enough where it will cause damage to future bullets.

Frontiersman is correct .... I had many guns of all types come into my shop for repair with nothing wrong except they got so corrupted with bullet and powder fouling that they quit working.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wheelguns, Just an FYI .... Every brand and model of 22 LR or 22 Mag revolver I've ever seen had .225" cylinder throats. Bullets range from .222" for match grade to as large as .224" for 22 Mag. When bullets get corroded, the diameter will increase even more. So, it's safe to say .... all 22 LR bullets that are not corroded are smaller in diameter than the cylinder throats. Why? 22 LRs develop 24,000 psi chamber pressure .... enough to force soft lead bullets to obturate (bump up in diameter) so they will get a tight seal in the bore. The diameter of the cylinder throat is the limiting factor for bullet expansion. 22 Mag bullets are jacketed and do not obturate but because they are .224", they need a slightly larger throat to prevent excessive chamber pressure from poking a larger bullet into a smaller hole.

What causes a forcing cone to get corrupted is simply a lack of preventative maintenance (cleaning). Powder and bullet residue will accumulate with each range trip and eventually will corrupt the forcing cone enough where it will cause damage to future bullets.

Frontiersman is correct .... I had many guns of all types come into my shop for repair with nothing wrong except they got so corrupted with bullet and powder fouling that they quit working.
 

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I don't feel the need to clean my Single Six every time I shoot it, but then again I don't always shoot hundreds of rounds when I take it out. Maybe just a couple dozen. I might only clean it every 3 or 4 times I go out, but I sure wouldn't wait 40 years.
How many rounds do you think have been put through it in that length of time ?

It's possible that a rougher than normal forcing cone could accelerate leading, but just try to clean it more often.
Or use copper washed bullets instead of bare lead ones. Like Frontiersman, I use Golden Bullets for my main plinking ammo. Much less likely to cause leading to build up.
I like CCI Mini-Mags, they are my second most accumulated ammo. But I try to save them for hunting/survival, as they are more expensive. The Golden Bullets shoot very well in all my .22s, not quite as good as Mini-mags, but close.

Long Branch Setter, you could try to soak the leaded forcing cone with some solvent, then "elbow grease" using a brush to get the lead out. Worst case scenario is chucking a short section of rod with a copper brush in a drill, and move that back and forth until the forcing cone is clean.
There is the Lewis Lead remover with it's bronze patches, but I'm not sure they make them in a .22 version. You could cut down some of the bronze patches to .22 size though.

I'd choose your ammo more carefully in the future, avoid bare lead ammo like Thunderbolts.
And clean a few times a year at the very least. All you have to do is remove the cylinder to clean an SA, no full disassembly required.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I did cut down a brass patch from Lewis and used a shaped piece of hard rubber to hold it on the cone. After a bit of elbow grease and a few choice words it’s clean as a whistle
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Just to save a little face here, I do clean after shooting. When I said I hadn’t cleaned it in 40 years I meant I hadn’t detail striped it in 40 years. In other words I had never totally disassembled the gun since it was new by removing the frame and all the “innards”. Surprisingly, it wasn’t as bad as you would expect. There was some oily gunk and powder residue that had accumulated but it came off with, again, a little elbow grease. Back then all Dad had that resembled gun oil was WD40 and he wasn’t going to buy anything he didn’t have to. Everything from Mom’s sewing machine to the pickup got WD40 when it squeaked, he bought it by the gallon. LOL

When we were kids we bought and shot whatever 22LR rounds we could afford at the local hardware store. On Sunday afternoon a friend, who had his drivers license, and I would go to the local trash pile and shoot a whole brick at bottles, cans and sometimes a rat or two. After a couple years and 50K or so rounds, It left me great memories, thought me how to shoot a pistol and promoted a lifelong love of SA pistols. Every time I pick that old Single Six up I smile and remember those days, that was another gift my Dad gave me that he will never know about.

Thank you all for the input and suggestions. Now I think I’ll head to the range, shoot a few rounds and smile...........

LBS
 
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