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Hey everyone,

I've been hunting for years with a Remington 700 .270 that my dad bought me when I was 16, and I recently got it into my head that I wanted to buy a gun for myself.

Well, I looked at other .270s, and .264s (which is what my dad shoots), and based off some things I read, I settled on .308. Mainly because of the availability and variety of ammo and I wanted to do something different than the rest of the guys in our hunting party, but for which a lot of info was available for.


Long story short, I settled on Ruger's M77 Mark II Target. It had everything I wanted, and it's easy on the eyes (and not too bad on the pocket). 26" Heavy Barrel, two stage trigger (which is exquisite), hinged floor plate, and even a Mauser style action (which is something I've come to appreciate after the purchase). I decided to try Hornady's Superformance 165 grain SST series factory ammunition.

Now, I can't reliably say how it shoots in terms of accuracy. After failing to get on paper at 25yds, we came to conclusion that the scope I ordered was toast and packed it in (Windage and Elevation knobs didn't made no change when focused on the 100yd target, crosshairs floated all over creation after 6 shots). I can say that recoil is totally negligible, and I have a very light build. It's fairly hefty, at a little over 10lbs with a scope, but feels well balanced to me.

The more I handle it, the more I like it. Ruger's scope rings are a new thing to me, but they feel like real quality pieces of work in the palm of my hand.

Until I can get my scope replaced (hopefully Burris will back their warranty - I've read some bad things), that's about all I can say for it, but so far I do like it.


It's got the matte stainless finish... Can anyone recommend cleaning products that are safe for the finish? I'm particular to Hoppes #9 (love the smell too, if they made cologne I'd wear it just to make myself happy), but I'm pretty particular about taking care of my things, and kind of ridiculously anal in the early days after the purchase.

Thanks!


Also, what's that grease they slather all over the action when they ship it, and is there a particular product for cleaning it? I've got it pretty well cleaned off, but the bolt didn't stop sticking until after I shot the gun and cleaned it all again.
 

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Welcome from Australia mate.
Glad to have you on board, nice folk here and lots of good info.
Nice rifle, congratulations.
 

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I've been using .308 for white tails and moose ever since my first introduction to the M14 in basic training. A very impressive caliber. Good choice in my book.
 

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.308 does it all! Excellent!
 

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Welcome to the forum! Excellent rifle! You've got good taste!

It's got the matte stainless finish... Can anyone recommend cleaning products that are safe for the finish? I'm particular to Hoppes #9 (love the smell too, if they made cologne I'd wear it just to make myself happy), but I'm pretty particular about taking care of my things, and kind of ridiculously anal in the early days after the purchase.
I don't see why Hoppes would hurt it, as long as it's not some kind of spray on finish.

Also, what's that grease they slather all over the action when they ship it, and is there a particular product for cleaning it? I've got it pretty well cleaned off, but the bolt didn't stop sticking until after I shot the gun and cleaned it all again.
You should get that heavy grease cleaned out of there before you use the gun. It is mainly used for long term storage only. Use Remington's Rem-Action cleaner to dissolve that gunk, and then lightly oil the cleaned parts. You may want to buy some .308 snap caps and work that action until it breaks in smooth.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Welcome to the forum! Excellent rifle! You've got good taste!

I don't see why Hoppes would hurt it, as long as it's not some kind of spray on finish.

You should get that heavy grease cleaned out of there before you use the gun. It is mainly used for long term storage only. Use Remington's Rem-Action cleaner to dissolve that gunk, and then lightly oil the cleaned parts. You may want to buy some .308 snap caps and work that action until it breaks in smooth.
I was actually looking at snap caps earlier on Midway's website (for dry fire), but the reviews have me dubious - guys talking about paint and finish of the devices scraping off inside the chamber.

I think I will pick up a can or two of Rem Action, though, and Rem Oil as well.

Thanks for the advice!

I've also been thinking about getting a bore sight, I thought it would make it easier to troubleshoot a bad scope, if nothing else, and speed up the initial sight in process.

My dad is adamant that as long as the scope works getting on paper at 25 yards shouldn't be a problem. Edit: And that I shouldn't waste money on a bore sight.
 

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I was actually looking at snap caps earlier on Midway's website (for dry fire), but the reviews have me dubious - guys talking about paint and finish of the devices scraping off inside the chamber.

I think I will pick up a can or two of Rem Action, though, and Rem Oil as well.

Thanks for the advice!

I've also been thinking about getting a bore sight, I thought it would make it easier to troubleshoot a bad scope, if nothing else, and speed up the initial sight in process.

My dad is adamant that as long as the scope works getting on paper at 25 yards shouldn't be a problem.
You can pass on the snap caps if you want, and just work the action. I use snap-caps in my revolver for practice and the paint did flake off a bit around the edges but only after a few hundred dry-firings, which easily wiped off the cylinder. But a bolt action rifle might pose a different problem.

You can sometimes get the Rem-Action cleaner and Rem-Oil cans in two packs if you look.
 

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You chose a good rifle in a good cartridge, a little heavy for hunting but manageable I assume, after all it's your shoulder carrying it not mine!;) The cartridge can handle most of what is on planet earth, just with a simple switch of bullet types and weights. You can hunt everything sensibly from groundhogs to moose with it. It can do everything your .270 can do, just a little more sensible for stuff like groundhogs and coyotes is the only difference as far as that goes. Good choice!

As for the Hoppe's #9, there should be no problem using that on the matte stainless finish. And I know what you mean about the smell, be the best cologne on the market.
 

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308 is a wonderful general purpose round though I still prefer 30-06.
He already has the .270 though, so it makes less sense to buy the '06 over the .308. Same reason why I've only had one .30-06, always seem to have a .270 and that blocks it like a filibuster.
 

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...It's got the matte stainless finish... Can anyone recommend cleaning products that are safe for the finish? I'm particular to Hoppes #9 (love the smell too, if they made cologne I'd wear it just to make myself happy), but I'm pretty particular about taking care of my things, and kind of ridiculously anal in the early days after the purchase.

I use the #9 on all my guns, and yes I have one like yours in 6.5 Creedmoor. Yeah, it's a familiar smell that brings back memories but I use it because it's worked on firearms for over a hundred years. BTW, I know it's known as "redneck cologne" but I don't think they sell it as cologne yet but but they do have an air freshener version here:

Hoppe's 9 - The Gun Care People

:)
 

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I use the #9 on all my guns, and yes I have one like yours in 6.5 Creedmoor. Yeah, it's a familiar smell that brings back memories but I use it because it's worked on firearms for over a hundred years. BTW, I know it's known as "redneck cologne" but I don't think they sell it as cologne yet but but they do have an air freshener version here:

Hoppe's 9 - The Gun Care People

:)
I have a pair on order, lol.

Since you've got a target model (and I just fired off an email to Ruger about this), is your barrel completely centered in the stock?

Mine's off center (or appears to be) - there's a great deal more clearance between the barrel and the right inner wall of the fore-end, and what I think is far too little clearance on the left.

I can take a dollar bill and slide it up to the receiver with no problems, but it looks off (if nothing else) and it's driving me nuts.

 

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Actually had to go and look at mine. It's centered...not perfectly, but close. You could loosen the heavy screw under the floorplate that you see when you open it. Then hold it centered and retighten. Make sure you slide a bill down it to make sure it's not contacting wood to barrel anywhere. If it's a problem with the fit I'm sure Ruger would refit it for you if you wanna take the time and expense to send it back.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Actually had to go and look at mine. It's centered...not perfectly, but close. You could loosen the heavy screw under the floorplate that you see when you open it. Then hold it centered and retighten. Make sure you slide a bill down it to make sure it's not contacting wood to barrel anywhere. If it's a problem with the fit I'm sure Ruger would refit it for you if you wanna take the time and expense to send it back.
According to Ruger;

Thank you for using the Ruger On-Line Customer Support Request Form.

This e-mail is in response to your question or comment of 01/03/2013
Request No:

Comment / question:

Hey guys, I just purchased a New M77 MKII Target in .308 and the only concern I currently have is that the barrel is not totally centered in the stock. It is free floating, and I can easily pass a dollar bill all the way up to the receiver, but the barrel is very close to the left wall of the fore-end, with much more clearance on the right.

If this is something I need to be concerned with, please let me know. I can provide pictures if necessary.

It looks off if nothing else.

Thank you

Response:
This is normal, and there is nothing that can be done. Its just the way the barrel sits in the stock. It will not decrease accuracy.

If you need further information, please visit our website at www.ruger.com or contact us at:



So I guess I just have to get used to it. I tried loosening the bolt under the floorplate but can't seem to get any results out of it.

On another note; I did try Hoppes #9 (on a rag) on the barrel, and so far so good. It even removed a big grease stain I thought was just a mar in the finish (hadn't wiped off with anything else). I'm ecstatic!
 

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I have a Ruger m77 hawkeye in 35 Whelen. I didn't like the stock fit (same issue as you). I also had unsatisfactory accuracy (2 inches at 100 yards). I got a Hogue overmold full length aluminum bed, and it shoots better. There are other things I did as well...

Ruger has some pretty roughly machined barrels. They are not horrible, just not up to my standard from the factory. I take a one caliber oversized brush, and wrap it in a patch impregnated with JB bore paste. I work it fore and aft in short strokes up the bore. You can feel rough patches and constrictions in the bore, and with some elbow grease, you can smooth it out. This is called lapping, and will greatly reduce cleaning effort in the future. I then use Kroil oil to clean out the JB, and penetrate into the crevices of the bore. I then repeat with the JB, until the bore is mirror bright with no tight spots.

For maintenance cleaning, I use Wipeout. It is a foaming cleaner. There are other foaming cleaners (made by Outers, Gunslick, etc) but Wipeout is the only one worth a damn. The Wipeout accelerator helps with dwell time.

For extremely fouled barrels, take a mop generously lathered with Kroil, and soak the bore. Give it a couple hours and run a tight patched jag through it. The Kroil will get under the copper fouling, loosen it up, and it will come out in flakes.

For other parts of the rifle (and all my pistols), I use "Ed's Red". It's cheap to make, (will save you hundreds of dollars over the use of a gallon) and works very well as a solvent. (google it)

Hoppes #9 makes a great cologne for reminiscing about the old days, but nothing else unless you like a false sense of accomplishment.


For quick cleanings at the range after short strings, I like Butch's Bore shine.
 

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It sure seems like you could move that. Maybe dremel out a small amount of wood on the right side of where the recoil lug drops into the stock. I had mine apart a couple weeks ago to lighten up the trigger but I didn't pay that much attention to how the action fit in the stock. If I ever open it again soon I'll give it a look.
 
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