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I traded my SP-101 .22 for a .327. I cannot remember which springs from the Wolff kit I put in the .22, though I did trade the main hammer spring out just before I traded it for what I thought was the stock spring. The kits don't cost much, and I'd like to put the reduced power springs on the .327. Is there any simple way to sort out the weight of the springs I have
 

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I traded my SP-101 .22 for a .327. I cannot remember which springs from the Wolff kit I put in the .22, though I did trade the main hammer spring out just before I traded it for what I thought was the stock spring. The kits don't cost much, and I'd like to put the reduced power springs on the .327. Is there any simple way to sort out the weight of the springs I have
Morning 64Chevy

Not simple but not rocket science either-

I just take a piece of steel strap & drill a small hole in it (about spring ID) then clamp that piece of steel in a vice.

Then make an arbor to fit through the center of the springs & be long enough to go through the longest spring & through the piece of steel with a hole in it. (a large nail will work here)

Then drill a small hole in the non headed end of the arbor & tie a small string in that hole.

Then take an old large plastic pop or water bottle & fill it partially with sand (or I use lead bird shot) or small rocks or even water. It needs to weigh about 9 pounds of so.

Then with that steel with a hole in it mounted in a vise (or even a small hole drilled in a work bench or table top) -- place one of the springs on top of the steel,, then drop the mandrel though the spring & through the steel,, then from underneath hang that 9lb weight on the mandrel (that should compress the spring to close to max compressed working height).

Now run all your springs through & with that 9# weight hanging on (& compressing) the spring measure the compressed spring height.

The weakest spring will compress the most with the strongest spring compressing the least.

This won't give you the exact spring load & rate but WILL allow comparing one spring to another as far as load goes.

If you measure all new (marked) springs when you get them (I do that) then write that info down you can then have future reference on identifying any rogue springs that you have.

It is also great for testing same (supposedly) weight springs & picking the lightest or heaviest in the same MARKED weight range.

I just measured 5 (marked) 10# Ruger main springs a few days ago & they varied by .133" (@9lb) in the same pack of 10lb springs.

OR-- as a very quick comparison test-- just clamp a long rod (or something) in a vise,, then slide one spring on the rod_ then a small washer_ then slide another spring on. Now push the springs together until both are almost compressed-- The lightest spring will compress the most & the heaviest spring will compress the least.

Just keep the weak spring of the two tested & test that against the next spring that you have. It won't take long to at least classify the weakest to the strongest spring.

You can also count coils ( & partial coils),, measure wire diameter, & measure spring length, but this is only accurate IF you have knowns' to compare the data to. (more coils & thinner wire is a weaker spring BUT remember a weaker (looking) spring can be stronger (at compressed height) if it is significantly longer so coil numbers & wire diameter can lie based on spring free length).
 
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