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I've often read Internet posts that the SP-101 trigger is not good.

The LCR has a good reputation, as does the GP-100 series.

I have a couple LCRs and a GP-100 and the triggers are, indeed, quite reasonable.

Today I tried out a SP-101 at a LGS dry firing it a few times. The trigger seems good. Not nearly as heavy as my S&W 642.

The SP-101 I tried was the DAO short barrel version, and I'm considering looking for a pocket revolver that can shoot 357 Magnum short barrel defense loads without killing my hand or making follow up shots too slow.
 

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I own the same model SP101. I felt that the original trigger pull was acceptable albeit a little stiff. I opted to install new Wolfe hammer and trigger springs which has turned it into a very pleasurable DAO revolver to use and shoot. I can actually squeeze cock the trigger consistently which allows for a little more precision shot. I understand in a defensive situation that feature would be meaningless, but it's nice to know that for practice I can keep my groupings relatively tight.
 

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So... A little bit of reality to tie all of this together.

I'll insert here that I won't waste time comparing an LCR-22 LR or WMR to the .357mag SP101 or GP100 in question. The Rimfire SP101, GP100, and LCR's all have heavier factory springs than their centerfire counterparts, as such, the rimfire versions should not be compared to the centerfire versions. BUT, the following comparison among centerfire only models will tend to hold true when comparing the rimfire models only together.

Rumor and Reputation: The GP100 often gets a reputation of a good trigger, as compared to the SP101 trigger, mostly by guys who are satisfied with OK triggers, but haven't experienced great triggers. So it's purely subjective, with no actual objective understanding behind it.

The SP101 gets a bad reputation because it's a light little gun with a relatively heavy trigger. Both the SP and the GP might leave the factory with a 10-12lb DA pull, but the SP's DA pull will tend to FEEL heavier, even if they were exactly the same on the scale, simply because it's a smaller piece with a shorter reach.

The LCR reputation for a great trigger is really relative to others in its class of internal hammer, DAO, small frame revolvers - and in its class, it's the cream of the crop. The SP and GP, however, do not fall into the same class, as they're completely different actions.

Design: The GP100 and SP101 lockwork are of the same design, but the GP100 is a larger frame, offering it a little better leverage on longer components. So it does tend to have a LITTLE better trigger out of the box than the SP101, but not usually significantly better. The SP101 as a 5 shot, compared to the GP100 6 shot, has to do more rotation of the cylinder with every pull, so even though the cylinder is smaller, it has to rotate farther, and that impacts the feel of the action.

Done up properly with springs, shims, and internal polish, both the SP and GP can have VERY good triggers. Unfortunately, they typically will not be able to surpass the flat spring S&W models for feel (assuming both receive equivalent extent of tuning), but they can get very close. The GP, as mentioned above, by design can typically be a LITTLE better in end result than an SP, but often not significantly different (notable, but not significant).

The LCR is a completely different lockwork design. The LCR cannot be made to have a lighter DA trigger, in my experience at least, than the SP101, simply because the LCR has even shorter hammer stroke, and less hammer mass, so it's always going to be behind the SP and GP as a factor of design. However, the camming action in its lockwork produces a VERY different feel, and among its peers - internal hammer, DAO revolvers - the LCR absolutely has the best trigger design and feel on the market. It will feel more consistent, with less stacking than an SP101, but the SP101 can have a significantly lighter pull in DA mode. Of course, comparing the sublime SA break of a tuned SP101 against an LCR isn't really fair, since the LCR is DAO, so I won't delve into DA/SA vs. DAO here.

Comparison: In general, I find that the LCR has a Good feeling trigger out of the box, and I would rate the SP and GP as Fair - slightly behind the LCR. Adding a spring kit and shims, with no other tuning will bring the GP and SP up to "Good," and typically slightly better feeling than an LCR. If all 3 are tuned to their minimal trigger pull and properly polished inside, then the GP will VERY slightly edge out the SP, and both will surpass the LCR's action. <-- this basically describes a $100-150 trigger job at a local revolversmith to reach this level, NOT a $800 custom smith action job.

HOWEVER!!!!!

You're looking for a pocket revolver. If you have the LCR already, you're set. The SP101 would be an addition, and would have less recoil, but it'll also nearly double the weight in your pocket. It won't do anything the LCR isn't currently doing for you, assuming you have a .357mag LCR.

Also, trigger pull in a pocket revolver is of minimal importance. It needs to be safe first, then light enough to manage for short range, large target accuracy. Nobody needs a 6lb DA trigger pull in a pocket revolver except for old folks with arthritic hands.
 

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Comparison: In general, I find that the LCR has a Good feeling trigger out of the box, and I would rate the SP and GP as Fair - slightly behind the LCR. Adding a spring kit and shims, with no other tuning will bring the GP and SP up to "Good," and typically slightly better feeling than an LCR. If all 3 are tuned to their minimal trigger pull and properly polished inside, then the GP will VERY slightly edge out the SP, and both will surpass the LCR's action. <-- this basically describes a $100-150 trigger job at a local revolversmith to reach this level, NOT a $800 custom smith action job.

HOWEVER!!!!!

You're looking for a pocket revolver. If you have the LCR already, you're set. The SP101 would be an addition, and would have less recoil, but it'll also nearly double the weight in your pocket. It won't do anything the LCR isn't currently doing for you, assuming you have a .357mag LCR.
Also, trigger pull in a pocket revolver is of minimal importance. It needs to be safe first, then light enough to manage for short range, large target accuracy. Nobody needs a 6lb DA trigger pull in a pocket revolver.
I don't enjoy the nice trigger pull that you speak of on my LCR. Actually I find it much stiffer than my SP101 DAO was originally. I purchased the LCR in .22 WMR after reading many posts regarding trigger pull and was somewhat disappointed in it. Even though the LCR was purchased primarily for my wife because she does not tolerate the recoil of my SP101 in .38, 38+P, .357 cal. I find it enjoyable to shoot and carry.


Regarding your inference that no one needs 6lb DA trigger pull in a revolver is arguable. I have severe arthritis in my hands and find a lighter trigger pull not only makes it easier for me but also more comfortable in general. I installed a 12# hammer spring coupled with a 8# trigger spring and find that to be very comfortable for me. I don't know what that equates to in actual trigger pull, but if I could have purchased a 6# trigger spring I would have...if only to see if it was comfortable for me. Even with the trigger job on my SP101 being very nice....it still fails in comparison to the factory DA pull of my Security Six.
 

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I've had my SP101 DAO in .357mag about 5 years. I was able to pull the trigger without any issues but didn't have another revolver to compare it too. I've had the replacement spring kit for a couple years and just decided to replace them this past week. A noticeably lighter pull now.

Regardless, it you are ok with the pull with the factory springs, there is no reason to change.
 

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I've often read Internet posts that the SP-101 trigger is not good.

The LCR has a good reputation, as does the GP-100 series.

I have a couple LCRs and a GP-100 and the triggers are, indeed, quite reasonable.

Today I tried out a SP-101 at a LGS dry firing it a few times. The trigger seems good. Not nearly as heavy as my S&W 642.

The SP-101 I tried was the DAO short barrel version, and I'm considering looking for a pocket revolver that can shoot 357 Magnum short barrel defense loads without killing my hand or making follow up shots too slow.
I have :
a 357 101
a 357 100
a 38 LCR

3 x K frame S&W revolvers, all original S&W.

To me the 101 and 100 are about the same.
But for my wife and daughter, the 100 bigger frame gives them problems in DA.
But fine with SA.
They rather shoot the 101, I think the smaller frame gets them a better perch for the squeeze and it feels easier to them.

They can shoot the K frames much easier and more comfortable than the 100 , again, smaller frame I guess helps.
And to me the triggers on all my S&Ws compared to my 100 and 100, the S&Ws are much better in SA and DA than my 101 and 100.

None of them will shoot the LCR , too much, but for DOA, I think it's got a GREAT feeling trigger.
I had tried it side by side to a couple of S&Ws DOA, and really wanted the S&Ws, but the LCR trigger was much better and it's what I came home with even though I had my heart set on a S&W snubbie.
 

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Made some modifications to my original post in concession to Agree 1950 wasting time to point out the difference between a rimfire LCR and a centerfire SP101, and his arthritic hands, which I had not considered pertinent in my original writing.
 

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Made some modifications to my original post in concession to Agree 1950 wasting time to point out the difference between a rimfire LCR and a centerfire SP101, and his arthritic hands, which I had not considered pertinent in my original writing.
:p. LMAO. Thanks for your heartfelt consideration!!
 

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So... A little bit of reality to tie all of this together.

I'll insert here that I won't waste time comparing an LCR-22 LR or WMR to the .357mag SP101 or GP100 in question. The Rimfire SP101, GP100, and LCR's all have heavier factory springs than their centerfire counterparts, as such, the rimfire versions should not be compared to the centerfire versions. BUT, the following comparison among centerfire only models will tend to hold true when comparing the rimfire models only together.

Rumor and Reputation: The GP100 often gets a reputation of a good trigger, as compared to the SP101 trigger, mostly by guys who are satisfied with OK triggers, but haven't experienced great triggers. So it's purely subjective, with no actual objective understanding behind it.

The SP101 gets a bad reputation because it's a light little gun with a relatively heavy trigger. Both the SP and the GP might leave the factory with a 10-12lb DA pull, but the SP's DA pull will tend to FEEL heavier, even if they were exactly the same on the scale, simply because it's a smaller piece with a shorter reach.

The LCR reputation for a great trigger is really relative to others in its class of internal hammer, DAO, small frame revolvers - and in its class, it's the cream of the crop. The SP and GP, however, do not fall into the same class, as they're completely different actions.

Design: The GP100 and SP101 lockwork are of the same design, but the GP100 is a larger frame, offering it a little better leverage on longer components. So it does tend to have a LITTLE better trigger out of the box than the SP101, but not usually significantly better. The SP101 as a 5 shot, compared to the GP100 6 shot, has to do more rotation of the cylinder with every pull, so even though the cylinder is smaller, it has to rotate farther, and that impacts the feel of the action.

Done up properly with springs, shims, and internal polish, both the SP and GP can have VERY good triggers. Unfortunately, they typically will not be able to surpass the flat spring S&W models for feel (assuming both receive equivalent extent of tuning), but they can get very close. The GP, as mentioned above, by design can typically be a LITTLE better in end result than an SP, but often not significantly different (notable, but not significant).

The LCR is a completely different lockwork design. The LCR cannot be made to have a lighter DA trigger, in my experience at least, than the SP101, simply because the LCR has even shorter hammer stroke, and less hammer mass, so it's always going to be behind the SP and GP as a factor of design. However, the camming action in its lockwork produces a VERY different feel, and among its peers - internal hammer, DAO revolvers - the LCR absolutely has the best trigger design and feel on the market. It will feel more consistent, with less stacking than an SP101, but the SP101 can have a significantly lighter pull in DA mode. Of course, comparing the sublime SA break of a tuned SP101 against an LCR isn't really fair, since the LCR is DAO, so I won't delve into DA/SA vs. DAO here.

Comparison: In general, I find that the LCR has a Good feeling trigger out of the box, and I would rate the SP and GP as Fair - slightly behind the LCR. Adding a spring kit and shims, with no other tuning will bring the GP and SP up to "Good," and typically slightly better feeling than an LCR. If all 3 are tuned to their minimal trigger pull and properly polished inside, then the GP will VERY slightly edge out the SP, and both will surpass the LCR's action. <-- this basically describes a $100-150 trigger job at a local revolversmith to reach this level, NOT a $800 custom smith action job.

HOWEVER!!!!!

You're looking for a pocket revolver. If you have the LCR already, you're set. The SP101 would be an addition, and would have less recoil, but it'll also nearly double the weight in your pocket. It won't do anything the LCR isn't currently doing for you, assuming you have a .357mag LCR.

Also, trigger pull in a pocket revolver is of minimal importance. It needs to be safe first, then light enough to manage for short range, large target accuracy. Nobody needs a 6lb DA trigger pull in a pocket revolver except for old folks with arthritic hands.
I agree. I have owned two SP101 revolvers. One was a 22LR and one was a 357 magnum 4 inch. The 22LR trigger was horrible. The 357 magnum was fair. My experience was the same Varminterror indicated. I have also owned two GP100 4 inch. Again one had a horrible trigger and one had a fair. I paid a gunsmith $100 for a trigger job on the one that had the horrible trigger. Trigger improved quite a bit. I have never owned a LCR.
I have come to the conclusion that most of the time when you buy a new Ruger double action revolver the trigger will be at best fair. Look on the forum and you will see many users buying springs kits and smoothing the trigger to make the trigger decent. This is my issue with todays Rugers. Why pay up to $800 for a SP101 or GP100 and have too do a trigger job to get a decent trigger. This tells me that Ruger does address this issue.
The one Ruger double action that I have owned had a great double action trigger from day one. It was a seldom used Ruger Police Service Six.
Now a days I seldom buy new revolvers. Too many quality issues.
Howard
 

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The one Ruger double action that I have owned had a great double action trigger from day one. It was a seldom used Ruger Police Service Six.
Now a days I seldom buy new revolvers. Too many quality issues.
Howard
I can attest to that! I have a Security Six that I purchased new in 1978 that has a glass smooth trigger compared to today's offerings.
 

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Regarding your inference that no one needs 6lb DA trigger pull in a revolver is arguable. I have severe arthritis in my hands and find a lighter trigger pull not only makes it easier for me but also more comfortable in general. I installed a 12# hammer spring coupled with a 8# trigger spring and find that to be very comfortable for me. I don't know what that equates to in actual trigger pull, but if I could have purchased a 6# trigger spring I would have...if only to see if it was comfortable for me. Even with the trigger job on my SP101 being very nice....it still fails in comparison to the factory DA pull of my Security Six.
I agree with you Argee 1950. I have experience similar experiences with my SP101 and GP100. Doing the spring replacement will in most cases improve the trigger pull. Old guys like me with hands that don't have the strength anymore can appreciate this. But the double action pull on my Ruger Service Six still is better. Double action pulls on the new Rugers just aren't as good.
 

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I've found that for the most part shooting them and dry firing them a bit smooths things out a lot.
 

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I believe for MIM, the older revolvers needed more fitting and finessing, so the end product was closer to being smoother than todays with all their rougher mim parts.
 

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I agree with you Argee 1950. I have experience similar experiences with my SP101 and GP100. Doing the spring replacement will in most cases improve the trigger pull. Old guys like me with hands that don't have the strength anymore can appreciate this. But the double action pull on my Ruger Service Six still is better. Double action pulls on the new Rugers just aren't as good.
This is a popular topic on here. The consensus is that Ruger is trying to keep up with orders by sacrificing QC. I also had to send my SP101 back and instead of repairing it and they replaced it. The new one still had a gritty feel to the trigger. An initial cleaning and light polishing with Emery cloth removed the grit...but you have to be careful not to sand anything...just clean off the burrs. I guess when you look at the new number that go out the door compared to what's coming back for repair it t apparently makes since to Ruger to keep an efficient CS department.
 

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I've found that for the most part shooting them and dry firing them a bit smooths things out a lot.
I agree...even after I completed the trigger and hammer springs it had smoohed out some...but when I took it out a pushed 70 rounds thru it... then it really smoothed out. Either that or my hand is to numb to know the difference. :rolleyes:
 
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