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I have a Ruger SP101 in 327. I'm looking at Wilson/Wollf Spring kit to lighten up the heavy double action trigger pull. I would like to use the 10 Ib hammer spring. My concern is reliability with the 327 since some of the ammo from some manufactures use small rife primers as do some hand-load recommendations. My hand-loads use CCI 500 primers. Would I be sacrificing reliability for lightness and maybe should use the 12 lb. spring? Any experience with the caliber, springs and gun?
 

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The spring/shim kits are not expensive and they are not difficult to install. Basically a complete tear-down for a good cleaning and reassemble with the chosen springs.
Try them to see if you like it. Though my SP101 is the .357mag, not the .327, I'm sure the result would be quite similar.
I replaced the trigger and hammer springs and shimmed the hammer. I also smoothed the contract points. The trigger pull is much smoother, and yes, lighter. It has ignited every primer so far (American Eagle, Magtech, Winchester) on .357mag and .38spl.
 

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I have a Ruger SP101 in 327. I'm looking at Wilson/Wollf Spring kit to lighten up the heavy double action trigger pull. I would like to use the 10 Ib hammer spring. My concern is reliability with the 327 since some of the ammo from some manufactures use small rife primers as do some hand-load recommendations. My hand-loads use CCI 500 primers. Would I be sacrificing reliability for lightness and maybe should use the 12 lb. spring? Any experience with the caliber, springs and gun?
I went from 14 to 10, got light strikes, and then went to 12. You just can't make a Ruger feel like a "sweet" action. These guns require their own skill level. Finger strength conditioning is something to think about, separate from actually shooting the gun or dry firing..
 

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I have a Ruger SP101 in 327. I'm looking at Wilson/Wollf Spring kit to lighten up the heavy double action trigger pull. I would like to use the 10 Ib hammer spring. My concern is reliability with the 327 since some of the ammo from some manufactures use small rife primers as do some hand-load recommendations. My hand-loads use CCI 500 primers. Would I be sacrificing reliability for lightness and maybe should use the 12 lb. spring? Any experience with the caliber, springs and gun?
Morning cds43016

I have (& presently shoot) the SP101 (.327)-- I also hand load & use CCI small rifle primers.

I have done a trigger job on the SP101 & do use a 10# Wolff spring with a cut-down (shortened) stock trigger spring, with trigger, hammer, & hammer dog all shimmed.

To get 100% ignition using small rifle primers I needed to shim the hammer (it movers smoother & faster when properly shimmed to center) & needed to add a thin washer above the 10# main spring (I didn't measure it's thickness but it is about one coil thickness thick)

(using CCI small rifle primers)--With JUST the 10# spring I would get about 1 misfire in every 1-2 cylinders of shooting. With JUST the 10# hammer spring plus SHIMMING the hammer I would get about 1 misfire in every 8-10 cylinders of shooting.

With the 10# spring, shimming the hammer, & adding that thin washer at top of spring I haven't seen a single misfire in over 500 round shot (even after my overnight freezer test). Freezer test = loaded gun in plastic bag & in freezer overnight then next morning walk out my back door & shoot a full cylinder as fast as possible.

Last I measured the trigger pull (at the point on trigger where my finger is placed) the single action pull was 3.5# (av of 5 pulls) & the double action pull was 7.5# (av of 5 pulls). The double action is a smooth pull but does have a little ramp-up just before it reaches center but pull past center is smooth & very smooth & predictable.

I would imagine an 11# main spring should work without the shims & other work if shooting small rifle primers.

Lance at HTTP://TriggerShims.com should have the 11# spring.
 

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Here's my personal recommendation, having done some similar things to a GP100, whose action is very similar.

If you are concerned about light primer strikes, start by only swapping out the trigger return spring. While you're at it, take a properly sized drill bit by hand and run it through the trigger return spring channel to pull out any burrs. This helped my GP 100 a lot.

If it's still not light enough then go with the next size down hammer spring and see if you have problems with light strikes.

If it's a brand new revolver, shoot it or dry fire it a lot as I have found that after a couple thousand trigger pulls (approximately two and one-half western movies) the trigger will likely smooth and lighten on its own by a very noticeable amount.

Each and every revolver will be different, so it's up to you to get the balance you want.

For my GP-100, I put in the heaviest hammer spring from the kit, and the lightest trigger return spring. I can say that the next time I have it apart, I intend to go to the next heavier trigger return spring to ensure a positive trigger return and I think it will fit my perfectly for my uses.
 

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Would I be sacrificing reliability for lightness and maybe should use the 12 lb. spring?
Probably.

The trigger spring seems to have the most effect if dropping the resistance for DA operation, the hammer springs I've worked with seem to have a lesser effect.

Try polishing the mating surfaces, and a shim kit first. Some of the resistance and roughness comes from the trigger spring and the moving parts in the tunnel the spring rides in. Some of the resistance/drag is the hammer surfaces and contact. If you put a couple hundred rounds of cheap .38's down range, you will easily see where things are dragging. Polish the surfaces that show drag wear. Polish is not grind or sand, or especially file.

Then try the different spring combinations to see what feels best to you. Without the polishing step, you can't feel the spring contribution as well.
 

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I have just done this to my .44 Magnum Redhawk.

Got the shooters pack from Wolff.

the stock trigger pull on a factory Redhawk is 17 lbs.

Wolff recommends NOT to change the spring if you're using the gun where it will be needed in a critical situation.

I installed the biggest of the 3 springs, which in my kit was the 14 lb spring.

even though it was just lightened 3 lbs, I have more trigger control than I did with the stock 17 lb spring.

and, I have shot some factory ammo with it, and the gun has yet to FTF.
 

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If you put a couple hundred rounds of cheap .38's down range, you will easily see where things are dragging. Polish the surfaces that show drag wear. Polish is not grind or sand, or especially file.
Morning TMan51

That could be a difficult thing to do as I doubt the .38 will fit in his (32 caliber) .327 cylinder.
 

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I put in lower strength springs and shins in my SP101 .22lr and .327fed mag guns. While I had them apart, I smoothed out all the working surfaces. They now are much improved and both function flawlessly.
 
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