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Discussion Starter #1
Today I got the Galco Fletch holster for my SP101 2.25" barrel from my LGS...it was something they had to order in.

Well, I got it home, and the thumb snap will not snap over the hammer spur! Super frustrating as it renders the whole the pointless....I can't carry a loaded gun around with a thumb snap open/flopping around.

Is there something I'm missing?
 

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Ruger Tinkerer
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mhuxtable, I have a couple of Phoenix holsters by Galco and a FLETCH and all of them were that way at first. My experience was by stretching it to make it snap it eventually got easier until very soon it was fine. My advice is don't give up on it just yet - there is apparently a small amount of stretch in leather that likely means it won't be too loose later.

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Ruger Tinkerer
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Try really pushing it down as deep into the holster as you can. I don't have my holsters handy right now so I'm going off memory but I seem to recall by getting the gun deeper into the holster it allowed the band to make the snap. In a sense you're really stretching the entire holster. I recall the first Galco holster I got was Phoenix for my GP100 and I was ready to call Galco and complain. But now they all fit as you expect. I use a Phoenix for a S&W 629 and the FLETCH on a 1911. I couldn't snap any of them at first but they're great now.
 

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Jaded James
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I have a Galco for my SR9c and it was very tight at first. It will break in soon enough and be a nice tight fit.
 

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It might take a little longer than overnight to stretch out the leather. Sometimes I used to have the same problem with my issued holsters and the ones I bought to actually use on duty.
 

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Whenever I get a new leather holster, I always put my guns in one or two sandwich bags and put them in the holster to stretch the leather a bit and let it sit over night. Then I draw and reholster the gun multiple times until the baggies are worn out, and then put my firearm itself in the holster to let it sit for a bit (few hours). After that, I don't have any problems. I don't use a thumb snap, but should work the same for you to stretch the snap part. If you want a snug fit, it's going to be a little tight at first. Work it in, then it will fit like a glove.
 

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Ausmerican.
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I always "fit" a new leather holster. I wrap the gun closely in clingy plastic wrap. I wet the holster under hot tap water for just a few seconds, and insert the wrapped gun. I leave it for about an hour, then remove and unwrap the gun. Let the holster sit indoors overnight and it's good to go.
 

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I bought a vintage George Lawrence holster that fit the SP101 perfectly, except for the strap. It was ~1/2 too short. I wet the strap, pulled, stretched until it snapped then left the gun in it, all snapped up until it dried. Works beautifully now. A perfect fit.
 

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Right from the Galco website: (If you go to the website you can link to the videos.)

Break-In and Holster fit
You can watch a video on holster break-in here.

One of the side effects of wet molding is a consolidation of the leather fibers, which “shrinks” the holster. If the fit is too tight when holstering your firearm the first time, don’t force it. If you do force the firearm into the holster, it may be very difficult to remove. Instead, follow these simple steps to break in your new holster using a process called blocking:

1. Place the unloaded firearm in a plastic freezer bag, or cover it in 2-3 layers of plastic kitchen wrap. Do not cover the grip.
2. Insert the bagged/wrapped firearm slowly into the holster, gently twisting it side-to-side to minimize tearing of the bag/wrap.
3. Once the firearm is completely seated in the holster, twist it about 1/16” in both directions 6-12 times.
4. Allow the bagged/wrapped firearm to sit in the holster for about 15 minutes.
5. Remove the firearm from the holster and remove the bag/wrap from the firearm.
6. Insert the unloaded firearm into the holster, which should now be snug but not loose. If it is still too tight, repeat the above steps until the holster is broken in to your satisfaction.


If the holster has a retention strap, it may also need some break in. You can watch a video on retention strap breakin-in here.

1. Place your unloaded firearm in the holster.
2. Hold the firearm grip in your right hand and the retention strap in your left.
3. Prepare the strap for stretching by grasping the snap and pulling the strap taut (remove the slack).
4. Twist the strap back and forth in a clockwise and counterclockwise rotation, while keeping it taut, 10-12 times.
5. Firmly push the firearm away from you while pulling on the strap and continue rotating the strap.
6. Release the tension for a moment and repeat two or three times.
7. Pull the strap over the back of the firearm without releasing tension.
8. While maintaining the strong tension, attempt to snap the retention strap closed.
9. Repeat steps five and six as needed.

Try the fit with your unloaded firearm again. Repeat the process as needed.

Try our Draw-Ez applied to the inside of the leather holster to shorten the break-in period and to provide a slicker draw. Draw-Ez only treats the interior surface of the leather and will not be absorbed by the leather or harm the finish of the firearm.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Great info...thank you. I worked the strap like it says and it did stretch a good bit....I've still got about a good 1/4" before the snap will close....I'll give it another go tomorrow
 
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