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Discussion Starter #1
Yes I know. First post and Im using it to ask about trigger work on an SP101. I realize that in general there are probably hundreds of threads on the topic, but I couldnt find anything with quite the information I was looking for.

Ive been contemplating doing a general clean up of the trigger on my revolver. Ive had it about a year with probably 800 rounds through it and its still pretty aggressive. The process seems pretty straight forward, but there was one part of the guide (sp101trigger.com) that makes me scratch my head a little.

The trigger return spring rides in a hole in the trigger housing. the inside of the hole has a pretty nasty surface. The guide advises using a 1/4" drill bit, by hand, to clean it up. With that kind of surface, it seems like thats the kind of tool that made the rough surface to begin with. I want to know if using a 1/4" reamer would yield a better result. Also, should I be shooting for exactly .250 or something slightly over?

Yes Im overthinking this. I know.

PS. Is there anything to the shims? I cant seem to find consensus anywhere...
 

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Ruger Tinkerer
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1/4" is not precisely the correct size of the hole in question. I believe the size is closer to 13/64" but the point is you are not really polishing up the inside of the hole but rather eliminating any burrs that may be present. The spring and plunger are not a tight fit inside the hole - there is some play there. I can usually feel the hole clean up with the drill bit turned by hand and whereas before the plunger would not easily come out of the hole, after the drill bit trick the plunger would fall out without needing any encouragement. This is all you're after with this. To actually polish the inner surface of the hole would require something else entirely and is not really necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No I have not changed springs yet. If Im going to give this a try, I want to order everything all at once. I am planning to get the wolff spring kit from midway. There seem to be enough options there for me to tinker with and see what combinations I like and still get reliable ignition with. Right now I know that its just a very heavy trigger pull in double action. I dont have a way to measure it, but my finger is getting worn out after a couple dozen pulls. In the mean time, Im dry firing more and using the coin balancing drill to try to get better. Its just difficult when I have to use this much of my grip strength to pull the trigger.

I do notice one hang up in particular through the double action pull. About a third of the way thru, just after the cylinder latch comes back into contact with the cylinder, the pull weight seems to increase a little bit. Theres definitely a step kind of feel to it. Any ideas what part of the lockwork is engaging or disengaging at that point?
 

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It is possible that is the point at which there is a change from the hammer dog and trigger shelf (top rear of the trigger) providing hammer lift to the double action sear. Here is a video showing the innards:

Ruger SP-101 Trigger

from Kevin Wilson's SP101 Tuning:

Ruger SP101 Trigger Job Guide

To remove here is a thread:

http://rugerforum.net/ruger-double-...01-trigger-job-question-multiple-threads.html

down at Exlogger's comments. In my case by changing the hammer dog I eliminated it. These can be had from Numrich.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That could very well be it. It seems like its happening earlier than that, but its hard to tell. I can actually look down in between the hammer and transfer bar and watch the hammer dog and trigger interact and it looks like theyre still pretty well engaged. The dog is not close to coming off the trigger when I get my hiccup. I wish I had a layout block or something to rig the parts up outside the frame and know for sure. And its the sear, so I cant just look for a worn spot....

Im going to investigate further next time I have it apart.
 

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Cat Herder
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I think just disassembling and cleaning my internals made as much difference as the springs. I didn't do any polishing or deburring.
 

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If it happens right after the cylinder latch is released by the trigger plunger it might be the latch dragging on the cylinder. Polishing the latch and eliminating any sharp edge may alleviate this. Only way to know is to take the gun apart and omit some parts and reassemble to see by process of elimination where to look. Had one Ruger that had a void on the contact surface of the hammer dog that did not do wonders for smoothness of operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
All disassembled. Exloggers Diagnosis seems the most accurate. Everything removed from the frame except the hammer and trigger, it still has that little hitch. But even after cleaning up everything in there, I still cant get it to go away. Im just a little scared to take material off of the trigger there. I went at it with some fine sand paper (1200) but I guess I need to spend more time on it.
 

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Yes I know. First post and Im using it to ask about trigger work on an SP101. I realize that in general there are probably hundreds of threads on the topic, but I couldnt find anything with quite the information I was looking for.

Ive been contemplating doing a general clean up of the trigger on my revolver. Ive had it about a year with probably 800 rounds through it and its still pretty aggressive. The process seems pretty straight forward, but there was one part of the guide (sp101trigger.com) that makes me scratch my head a little.

The trigger return spring rides in a hole in the trigger housing. the inside of the hole has a pretty nasty surface. The guide advises using a 1/4" drill bit, by hand, to clean it up. With that kind of surface, it seems like thats the kind of tool that made the rough surface to begin with. I want to know if using a 1/4" reamer would yield a better result. Also, should I be shooting for exactly .250 or something slightly over?

Yes Im overthinking this. I know.

PS. Is there anything to the shims? I cant seem to find consensus anywhere...
A 1/4" shaft has always fit for me. I turn it by hand with the fluted end (drill end) in the housing first to knock off any burrs, and then I flip the bit around, rub lapping compound on the shaft, then spin it in the housing with a drill. Equally, I polish the plunger itself - I've even remade plungers to produce a tighter fit.

You won't find consensus on shims at this forum. About half of the folks on this forum believe that nobody should ever have action work done on their guns, because they "work" straight from factory, with a few hold outs suggesting it's unwise to ever modify any firearm, or ever have one modified even by a professional. The other half of this forum is supportive of action work, with some of us - myself for one - being the type that many of the 300+ firearms that I have owned have had action work done before I even took a test fire, and almost ALL of them having at least trigger work done.

I use shims, I find that when the action has been tuned, it does produce more consistent trigger and action feel. For the minimal investment impact, they're worth buying.
 

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A 1/4" shaft has always fit for me. I turn it by hand with the fluted end (drill end) in the housing first to knock off any burrs, and then I flip the bit around, rub lapping compound on the shaft, then spin it in the housing with a drill. Equally, I polish the plunger itself - I've even remade plungers to produce a tighter fit.

You won't find consensus on shims at this forum. About half of the folks on this forum believe that nobody should ever have action work done on their guns, because they "work" straight from factory, with a few hold outs suggesting it's unwise to ever modify any firearm, or ever have one modified even by a professional. The other half of this forum is supportive of action work, with some of us - myself for one - being the type that many of the 300+ firearms that I have owned have had action work done before I even took a test fire, and almost ALL of them having at least trigger work done.

I use shims, I find that when the action has been tuned, it does produce more consistent trigger and action feel. For the minimal investment impact, they're worth buying.
Great idea! That's why I love this forum - I learn something new almost every day!
 

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Great idea! That's why I love this forum - I learn something new almost every day!
If a guy ever needs a new trigger spring plunger and don't want to wait on Ruger to send one, that same drill bit shank will make a dandy starting point. Don't need a machine lathe, you just need a drill press, a file, and a steady hand. Works for making oversized trigger guard latches too.
 

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I ground a reamer to size for the hole. I then make my own "return spring cap" (that's what I'm calling it).

Let's me get a smooth as glass trigger spring movement.
 

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I did as Varminterror suggested with the drill bit, using both ends. The burr where the plunger cap is retained is much harder to get rid of. For me it was easier to assemble the trigger assembly without springs and keep trying your "fit" until as much friction as possible is gone. For me shims made a huge difference, like adding ball bearings!

Problem areas not addressed in the videos I saw that gave me grief are as follows...1). Transfer bar dragging on frame (adds friction as you described). Prussian blue will show where it drags on frame. 2). Hammer spring dawg has a burr that binds on the hammer strut as this spring is compressed. I smooth the edges of the hammer strut and the hammer spring dawg. Go slow and re-assemble, test, break down again and repeat to you get the feel you want.
 

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I hate to derail this thread on a high level discussion about mechanics, but I can't help myself!

So do you think that the ball bearings on the plunger would be worth the trouble (gonna be tiny!!) I've always assumed that the spring ends up being a major source for friction on the walls, such that going past a mirror polish on the plunger doesn't get me much. I polish the spring as well to help there. I might have to get creative with a bearing supported plunger this fall when outside work slows down!

One of the better ideas I've had for trigger feel on Ruger DA's - that don't mind sharing publicly - is to make a "shim" or "bushing" to put INSIDE the trigger, beside the "trigger plunger" (Part 11 in my owner's manual) to help keep it tracking straight. I noticed that the trigger plunger was the part that failed to reset when I had a very minimal trigger reset spring installed, meaning the tip of the plunger wouldn't pop over the top of the lip on the cylinder latch, so it wouldn't unlock the cylinder when you pulled the trigger for the subsequent shot. By adding that shim, I could take coils off of a reduced power trigger reset spring and still get reliable trigger resets.

I'm sure that's clear as mud, but that's been one of the highest pay back innovations that I've had for the Ruger SP/GP/RH/SRH triggers.

I've also noticed on several Ruger DA's that the top of the "toe" of the hammer - the cutout below the hammer dog - needs to be dressed to allow the trigger to return fully forward. The tip of the sear interface on the trigger makes contact with that part of the hammer when at rest (hammer down, trigger forward) on certain specimen, so it's the positive stop for forward trigger movement. I've needed to dress that part of the hammer on a handful of Ruger DA revolvers to give just the last few fractional thousandths of forward trigger roll to let it reset more reliably with minimal weight springs.

I've never tried to go as low as I can go, because those modifications let me go lower than I want for hunting revolvers.
 

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Adding the ball bearings reduce the surface area that rubs inside the plunger "tube".

I then turn my new plunger for a smaller spring and the cap has its own little guide rod..

When all this is done I can equal what I can get out of one of my bullseye/I core smiths.

When I do a full match trigger job for a ruger I don't use wolf springs or any other mass produced brand.

I make my own. Totally different coil count and wire size.
 

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Coming back after a long absence, and because I just picked up a "new" SP.:) Funny that you mention the bearings- yes, they do make a difference. They're an old addition to a good S&W trigger.

As far as general polish-and-buff, I use Cratex diamond-imptegnated rubber polishing bits (F-XXF) to slick up most spring pathways. Placing bearing can be done in one of two ways. Either the bearings will simply sit on the faces of the trigger guard retaining plunger and the trigger return plunger, in which case, you'll clip coils from the spring, roughly equaling the size of the diameter of the bearing. Preferably, you cut the plungers down by ~1/3-1/2 their length, chamfer the inner edges to cup the bearings and set the spring between the bearings. Personally, I don't use any lighter springs because its too easy for me to outrun the trigger.

Of course, if you don't do much in the way of cleaning up the internals, all the machining marks (if not the leavings) do a good job of slowing your trigger down as well as increasing the pull.:D
 
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