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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone tried or installed a MAJESTIC SPEEDSTRIP on their MK 3?
Like it?
Problems?
Every time I take it apart I panic, would this help?
Another question, why remove the Mag disconnect and Loaded Chamber Indicator?
 

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I can't speak to the speedstrip question, but I did recently replace the mag disconnect on my MkIII 22/45with the TandemKross bushing. I did so to address issues with the mags not seating properly and not coming out cleanly when ejected. Both of those issues seem resolved, and I don't think the mag disconnect feature was particularly needed or useful on a range gun like my 22/45. I have not removed the LCI, although tempted. I think the LCI contributes to occasional FTEs but not yet severe enough a problem to replace with a filler.

Hope this is of help.
 

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IMHO
The Majestic speedstrip is a solution looking for a problem. The Mk pistols are not that difficult to dis-assemble or re-assemble if the directions in the owners manual are followed precisely.
I have found that removing the mag dis-connect, a) makes the dis-assemble or re-assemble process more simple, b) aids in mag removal and, c) lowers trigger pull weight (especially if an aftermarket sear and/or trigger is installed).

Removing the LCI will make cleaning the receiver a little easier.
 

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DAKA, The Majestic Speedstrip is supposed to make disassembly/reassembly easier but in reality, it doesn't. Just money wasted in my opinion.

There's no good reason to remove the Loaded Chamber Indicator .... other than for cosmetic purposes. It doesn't hurt a thing and actually helps some guns feed better. Besides, the indicator actually works ... you can see or feel the extension stick out if there is a cartridge chambered. I find this a handy feature. Granted, the LCI is ugly compared to a MK II that doesn't have one, but it adds a useable safety feature.

As for the Magazine Disconnect ... I think this is a classic case of "Band-Aid engineering". Ruger took a perfectly good MK II design then modified the action with a spring loaded lever that contacts the top of the magazine. When there is no magazine inserted, the lever disconnects the sear, thus preventing the gun from firing. In concept, it is a great safety device .... found in many semi-autos dating back 80 years. In reality, Ruger's design sucks. The MD lever tends to hold the magazine in place when the magazine release button is pushed. This means you have to physically pull the magazine out ... versus having the magazine drop free. It also means you have to insert a magazine then pull it out at proper times when you disassemble or reassemble a MK III. It's hard enough as it is ... no more complications needed. The magazine release button (located behind the trigger) is also a safety device so you can keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction when unloading/loading. The old design was a heel latch on the butt of the grip. With the old MK I and MK II design, there's almost no way to remove and replace a magazine without pointing the muzzle at things you don't intend to shoot. So ... here we have a very nice magazine release that is virtually negated because of the silly magazine disconnect design and you're back to waving the gun around while swapping magazines. I don't consider trading one safety feature for another as progress ... just a way to pacify California laws so the gun can be sold there.

A simple magazine disconnect bushing can be installed to eliminate the magazine disconnect. Of course this means the gun can be fired without a magazine ... just like a MK I or MK II. Tandemkross makes the bushing ... about 10 bucks. Here's a link: Ruger Mark III and 22/45 Magazine Disconnect Removal Hammer Bushing If you install this bushing, your magazines will drop free when you push the mag release button, thus a safer procedure when swapping magazines. It also takes a couple steps out of the disassembly/reassembly process. As usual, just my opinion.
 

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The Majestic Speedstrip is supposed to make disassembly/reassembly easier but in reality, it doesn't. Just money wasted in my opinion.
I respectfully disagree with Iowegan. I have a Mark II Target I bought new in 1988. I learned the dis/reassembly process on this gun, long before there were youtube videos, and internet forums. I have no difficulty taking down my Mark II or my three 22/45s. I did however install the Majestic 3.2 kit on all three of my 22/45s. The reason was that for a few dollars it greatly improves the trigger pull(Mark II didn't need), eliminates the magazine disconnect(Mark II doesn't have), and gives the added benefit of the Speed Strip. I have used the Speed Strip several times, and I can see how this would be great for someone who has difficulty with the standard process. It allows you to pull the bolt quickly, give the gun a patch or two down the bore, maybe a toothbrush to the chamber area, and back to shooting quickly. There are many shooters who cant reassemble the pistol, and take it to the LGS for help. The 3.2 Speed Strip Kit eliminates all that misery, improves the trigger, and eliminates the mag disco.
 

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weblance, I just looked up the Speedstrip kit ... thought maybe we were talking about a different item .... and I guess we were. The last time I saw a Speedstrip kit, it was nothing more than a 2-piece bolt stop pin. I see it is now available with a bushing to eliminate the mag disconnect plus a sear and hammer. At $87.90 for the complete kit, I think it is way over priced but then again I know how to disassemble/reassemble MK Series pistols, do a trigger job, or install a 10 dollar Tandemkross bushing in a MK III. Fact is, I made bushings on my lathe for my MK IIIs in about 10 minutes each.

It's not that the 2-piece bolt stop pin doesn't work .... it does, but I don't think it is any easier to disassemble/reassemble than with the factory bolt stop pin.
 

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I'm a fan of lowegan; he offers great, well thought out, advice. The best part is his responses cause me to think about the issues. As a youngster, I had a flair for mechanical devices and followed that for 12 years working on aircraft, jet engines & turbines, missiles, solid and liquid rocket motors, hypersonic ramjet engines, the related support equipment, teaching maintenance on same, along with teaching aircraft accident investigation. Plus, working on cars, motorcycles and boats until old age slowed me way down.

All this taught me one major thing, the KISS principle. "Keep It Simple Stupid". The second thing was when in doubt, read and follow the manual.

The Mark iii will come apart and go together just like the Ruger manual specifies. The guns weren't designed using the KISS principle, but the Ruger instructions are correct. I had to consult a gunsmith the first time I messed up assembly. And, I keep doing it incorrectly, if I don't read the instructions each time. At least, I now know to not press on when I'm doing it incorrectly.
 

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I'm a fan of lowegan; he offers great, well thought out, advice. The best part is his responses cause me to think about the issues. As a youngster, I had a flair for mechanical devices and followed that for 12 years working on aircraft, jet engines & turbines, missiles, solid and liquid rocket motors, hypersonic ramjet engines, the related support equipment, teaching maintenance on same, along with teaching aircraft accident investigation. Plus, working on cars, motorcycles and boats until old age slowed me way down.

All this taught me one major thing, the KISS principle. "Keep It Simple Stupid". The second thing was when in doubt, read and follow the manual.

The Mark iii will come apart and go together just like the Ruger manual specifies. The guns weren't designed using the KISS principle, but the Ruger instructions are correct. I had to consult a gunsmith the first time I messed up assembly. And, I keep doing it incorrectly, if I don't read the instructions each time. At least, I now know to not press on when I'm doing it incorrectly.
Thats exactly why I think the speed strip is a good idea, for those who cannot reassemble the Mark pistol without dismay. Not everyone can do it as easily as you, Iowegan, and myself.

Changing the oil in my car is easy. I can do it in under 30 minutes, when my knees allow. I relate changing the oil in an automobile, to dis/reassembling the Mark pistol. Not everyone can change their own oil. Thats why there are Quick Change oil places. Not everyone can dis/reassemble the Mark pistol. Thats why the Speed Strip was designed.
 
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