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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am trying to find 'users' of spotting scopes. I cannot reasonably afford Ziess, nor any of that end of the spectrum. My interest is; just being outside and for shooting related sighting.

I'm not totally new to looking and searching the different makers and manufactors, It is just difficult to get a grip; with out shoving money into something that just want do the job.
100yds and out is what I'm thinking.
All advice is welcome.

Thanks in advance:)
 

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Neophyte, You don't need to spend megabucks to get a decent spotting scope but $100 is about the minimum for something decent. You need at least 45X magnification to see 22 cal holes at 100 yds. You also need a tripod or some sort of mount. I have two types ... a full sized prism type 20-60X scope mounted on a tripod and a 15-45X compact prism scope mounted inside the hinged lid of my range box. Here a good deal on a Burris ... see: http://www.opticsplanet.net/burris-20x50mm-landmark-compact-spotting-scope.html
 

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I've been looking for a spotter also, that Burris 20x50mm is on my list. That price is good, I may oder that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Respected

Iowegan: Sir; thats why you are respected.:) Thanks for the up-dated finding and thought.
 

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its to bad your not in canada or i would tell you to pick up one from princess auto they have a 23x model for only 30$ its actually quite good its branded as there own brand power fist
 

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Discussion Starter #7
web site

jdawg: Sir; do they have a "web" site. I'm not opposed to ordering one.:)

Thanks
 

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http://www.opticsplanet.net/spottingscopes.html
Try this place. I have bought a few scopes from them and have been very happy with thier service.
I have a similar setup to Iowegan. A 20-60x on a tripod and a 20-50x in my gun box. For .22's at 100 yards you definately want a 60x.
Good luck in your search.
 

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I have two of the Burris 20x50's and they are great compact birding scopes. I put mine on the end of my Cabela's guide walking pole and use it as a monopod. The scope is small enough to leave on there for 3-5 mile walk. Optics are bright and clear and since they are waterproof and fogproof there is no need to worry about rain. Whenever I go on the local Audubon bird trips around the area there are always a good number of people there with very high end scopes. Everyone is always happy to let you take a peek through them. Most of the people have a good 20x installed even in the larger more expensive scopes. Some have zooms but just the zoom lenses they have, with no scope body, start at $200 and go up from there.

If I wanted something more than the 20x I would try the Celestron C90 with good fixed power 20x, 37x (comes with it) and 60x lenses and a good doubler to start. This will be slower than a zoom to change magnifications but you get much better images vs a cheap zoom. Think 5" portable black and white tv vs. a 72" plasma. The difference is that stunning. The scope is waterproof and at $189 is a good buy. http://www.opticsplanet.net/celestron-c90-mak-spotting-scope.html. If I didn't want to mess with extra lenses I would try the Burris XTS-2572 25-75x70mm Xtreme tactical Cassegrain spotting scope for $204 http://www.opticsplanet.net/burris-25x-75x-70mm-xts-2575-spotter-spotting-scope.html . Both are Cassegrain scopes, the design of which uses mirrors in place of lenses so you can get a much better image at higher powers at a lower cost. You can also spend a lot on these as the absolute best birding scopes are Cassegrain designs. Here is a great article on them and their good and bad points http://www.betterviewdesired.com/Catadioptric-or-Mirror-Scopes.php.

Excerpt from link above.
"
The Distance Factor
The major advantage of mirror optics, as noted at the top of this article, is compactness . . . the ability to build a large aperture, long focal length instrument into a very small package. Large aperture and long focal length equal better high power performance. Even the (discontinued) little Bausch and Lomb 8080 Cat, with an 80mm mirror and a focal length of 800mm, provides quite good performance at 100 power. Reaching 100x with most refractor spotting scopes, with their much shorter focal length objectives, would require an eyepiece with such a short focal length that your eye would be all but in contact with the glass, and, even then, it is doubtful you would see much useful detail in the image. Both the C5 and the Questar have focal lengths of over 1200mm and enough light gathering ability to provide fairly bright images at high powers. 100 power is no strain for either of them, and the C5, in particular, yields very good images, even in subdued light, at 150x. When distance is a major factor, there is simply nothing to match a good Cat equipped with the proper eyepieces (unless, of course, you are willing to carry a big, long focal length astronomical refractor out into the field with you)."
 

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Wuchak, you sure do know your optics. If I ever have a question on scopes I am coming to you.
 

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I didn't want to sink a lot of money at the time as I was doing more shotgun sports than riflles. I did a mail order in 2004 and I think I kept it to around $200.

I got a Winchester scope with a hard case that held the tripod.

Is 60 mm objective lens, 30-120 magnification.

If I were to buy another one, I would get the angled view. I see more people using them as you don't have to bend down as much if you want it nearby and don't want to fully stand.

Dana
 

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+ 1 on getting the angled eyepiece. I like my Nikon Earth and Sky, but wish it had the angled ocular for bench work.

BD
 

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I've had good luck with my Leupold "Sequoia" 20-60X80mm spotting scope. Decent optics and eye relief for the money ($337.00 new) and carries Leupold's worry-free warranty.
I use a spotting scope mainly for high-power rifle shooting (out to 600 yards at Camp Perry where you're looking mostly for changes in mirage) and know that a sturdy, well-made/designed stand is about as important as the scope is for clear images. Finally, I'm also a strong proponent of the angled eyepiece.
 
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