Ruger Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my Ruger SA1911 for 8 years now and love the gun,and it's the most accurate handgun I own. That said, it seems that pulling the slide back is getting to be a real challenge. Yes, I am getting older and don't have the strength I used to have, but was wondering........ can the spring be be changed to lighten up the slide pull? and if so, will that change the accuracy?
 

·
Corps Commander NGV
Joined
·
7,118 Posts
You can put in a lighter spring, but then you run the risk of battering the frame due to the increase in slide velocity. If you will be using target loads you will be fine. Avoid +P ammo with any reduced power spring. If you set up for target ammo with a light spring even hardball can hurt your pistol.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
17,807 Posts
My SR1911 came with a 18.5 lb recoil spring, which is typically used for +P loads. The standard 1911 recoil spring is 16 lbs and is intended for normal factory loads. With a 16 lb recoil spring, it feels notably lighter when you operate the slide. You can buy 16 lb recoil springs from Midway USA, Brownell's, or many other on-line sources for $10 or less. They should be replaced about every 500 to 1000 rounds, depending on the power of the loads used.

To avoid having to pull the slide back repeatedly, here's a tip, (which by the way is the intended way to operate a 1911): When loading for the first time in a shooting session, secure an empty magazine in the 1911 then pull the slide back until it locks, then remove the empty magazine. From that point on, let the gun work for you instead of you working for the gun. By that I mean .... with the slide locked back, insert the first loaded magazine, charge the chamber, and shoot until the magazine is empty and the slide locks back automatically. Push the magazine release button and eject the spent magazine. Replace the magazine with a loaded magazine then chamber the first round by pressing down on the slide lock. Repeat the same drill until you finish the shooting session. If your 1911 is operating the way it should, there should be no need to operate the slide more than once per shooting session .... no matter how many rounds you fire.

The only exception to this recommended procedure is when you have some sort of jam. The safest way to clear a jam starts by removing the magazine, no matter if it is empty or partly full, then pull the slide back and manually lock it to the rear by pushing up on the slide lock when the slide is fully in the rear position. Normally this will clear a jam and allow you to continue shooting after reinserting a loaded magazine.

Try to avoid inserting a magazine with the slide forward. The top round in the magazine will push against the bottom of the slide and make it difficult to overcome the magazine's spring tension to latch the magazine in place. This can damage the magazine or magazine latch and of course you have to operate the slide each time you load. It can also damage the top round, which can make the 1911 fail to feed, plus a damaged bullet will fly goofy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,076 Posts
My SR1911 came with a 18.5 lb recoil spring, which is typically used for +P loads. The standard 1911 recoil spring is 16 lbs and is intended for normal factory loads. With a 16 lb recoil spring, it feels notably lighter when you operate the slide. You can buy 16 lb recoil springs from Midway USA, Brownell's, or many other on-line sources for $10 or less. They should be replaced about every 500 to 1000 rounds, depending on the power of the loads used.

To avoid having to pull the slide back repeatedly, here's a tip, (which by the way is the intended way to operate a 1911): When loading for the first time in a shooting session, secure an empty magazine in the 1911 then pull the slide back until it locks, then remove the empty magazine. From that point on, let the gun work for you instead of you working for the gun. By that I mean .... with the slide locked back, insert the first loaded magazine, charge the chamber, and shoot until the magazine is empty and the slide locks back automatically. Push the magazine release button and eject the spent magazine. Replace the magazine with a loaded magazine then chamber the first round by pressing down on the slide lock. Repeat the same drill until you finish the shooting session. If your 1911 is operating the way it should, there should be no need to operate the slide more than once per shooting session .... no matter how many rounds you fire.

The only exception to this recommended procedure is when you have some sort of jam. The safest way to clear a jam starts by removing the magazine, no matter if it is empty or partly full, then pull the slide back and manually lock it to the rear by pushing up on the slide lock when the slide is fully in the rear position. Normally this will clear a jam and allow you to continue shooting after reinserting a loaded magazine.

Try to avoid inserting a magazine with the slide forward. The top round in the magazine will push against the bottom of the slide and make it difficult to overcome the magazine's spring tension to latch the magazine in place. This can damage the magazine or magazine latch and of course you have to operate the slide each time you load. It can also damage the top round, which can make the 1911 fail to feed, plus a damaged bullet will fly goofy.
All I can add is +1 to that ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,810 Posts
My SR1911 came with a 18.5 lb recoil spring, which is typically used for +P loads. The standard 1911 recoil spring is 16 lbs and is intended for normal factory loads. With a 16 lb recoil spring, it feels notably lighter when you operate the slide. You can buy 16 lb recoil springs from Midway USA, Brownell's, or many other on-line sources for $10 or less. They should be replaced about every 500 to 1000 rounds, depending on the power of the loads used.

To avoid having to pull the slide back repeatedly, here's a tip, (which by the way is the intended way to operate a 1911): When loading for the first time in a shooting session, secure an empty magazine in the 1911 then pull the slide back until it locks, then remove the empty magazine. From that point on, let the gun work for you instead of you working for the gun. By that I mean .... with the slide locked back, insert the first loaded magazine, charge the chamber, and shoot until the magazine is empty and the slide locks back automatically. Push the magazine release button and eject the spent magazine. Replace the magazine with a loaded magazine then chamber the first round by pressing down on the slide lock. Repeat the same drill until you finish the shooting session. If your 1911 is operating the way it should, there should be no need to operate the slide more than once per shooting session .... no matter how many rounds you fire.

The only exception to this recommended procedure is when you have some sort of jam. The safest way to clear a jam starts by removing the magazine, no matter if it is empty or partly full, then pull the slide back and manually lock it to the rear by pushing up on the slide lock when the slide is fully in the rear position. Normally this will clear a jam and allow you to continue shooting after reinserting a loaded magazine.

Try to avoid inserting a magazine with the slide forward. The top round in the magazine will push against the bottom of the slide and make it difficult to overcome the magazine's spring tension to latch the magazine in place. This can damage the magazine or magazine latch and of course you have to operate the slide each time you load. It can also damage the top round, which can make the 1911 fail to feed, plus a damaged bullet will fly goofy.
Thanks Iowegan...as usual, your response(s) cover the subject matter completely, concisely, and provides an eye-opening education to us all! Greatly appreciated sir!
Good question from the OP as well...we all deal with changes in our physical abilities as we gracefully grow older!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,076 Posts
Thanks Iowegan...as usual, your response(s) cover the subject matter completely, concisely, and provides an eye-opening education to us all! Greatly appreciated sir!
Good question from the OP as well...we all deal with changes in our physical abilities as we gracefully grow older!
What the hell are you talking about? I ain't growing old gracefully, I'm going kicking and fighting till the all mighty spirit above says otherwise ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Change your racking technique.

Instead of pulling the slide over the frame, hold the slide stationary, and push the frame under the slide. You'll find it easier to rack the gun because your muscles pushing the frame are stronger.


Technique will make a big difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,076 Posts
Change your racking technique.

Instead of pulling the slide over the frame, hold the slide stationary, and push the frame under the slide. You'll find it easier to rack the gun because your muscles pushing the frame are stronger.


Technique will make a big difference.
I do a combination of both methods ... works well for me ...
 
  • Like
Reactions: jj63

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,810 Posts
Change your racking technique.
Instead of pulling the slide over the frame, hold the slide stationary, and push the frame under the slide. You'll find it easier to rack the gun because your muscles pushing the frame are stronger.
Technique will make a big difference.
I've seen 3 videos recently that recommended that method for anyone having difficulty racking a slide.
The two key safety elements is to keep the booger finger off the trigger until you're ready to shoot and to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction at all times!
 
  • Like
Reactions: rmichael63

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
My Mom carried a P95 as her concealed handgun.
At 85 she fell and tore some ligaments in her wrist, which then made racking the slide difficult.

Stopped by to visit her one day and clean her pistol, the discussion turned to the racking of the slide issue.

She stated that it was no longer an issue because someone had shown her how to rack the slide.

Ok, show me. (Pistol was clean and empty.)

She took the pistol, placed the front site against the door jam, put a little weight against it, and racked the slide.

The method did work.

A week or two later, I "traded" her a new LCR in .38 Special for her P95.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,810 Posts
My Mom carried a P95 as her concealed handgun.
At 85 she fell and tore some ligaments in her wrist, which then made racking the slide difficult.
Stopped by to visit her one day and clean her pistol, the discussion turned to the racking of the slide issue.
She stated that it was no longer an issue because someone had shown her how to rack the slide.
Ok, show me. (Pistol was clean and empty.)
She took the pistol, placed the front site against the door jam, put a little weight against it, and racked the slide.
The method did work.
A week or two later, I "traded" her a new LCR in .38 Special for her P95.
Where there's a will, there's a way...good for her!
Gotta love an older, yet very reliable, pistol that shoots very well...
I have a couple of P-95's.....great shooting pistols!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top