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Discussion Starter #1
Folks,

It seems I've exhausted my efforts digging through posts to see if the stainless steel upgrade (with a stiffer spring, I am just shooting factory loads) is worth it.

Assembled Stainless Steel Guide Rod for Ruger SR9c/40c :: SR9c and SR40c Performance Parts :: Ruger? Performance :: Galloway Precision

I've understand the whole plastic vs. stainless, but it does not seem that there has been any resolution on the effectiveness (or not) of helping to reduce muzzle flip/recoil. Seems to be a mixed bag at best.

Being no engineer, my caveman thoughts would be that a stiffer spring could help to soften the recoil if the spring absorbs more, but would love input.

A brisk 10 degrees here in Michigan. Bundle up!
 

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Well, I can't speak for the Ruger pistol, but I can speak for a Kel Tec P-11. When I ordered a steel guide rod for the one I used to own, I believe it improved the function of the gun. It seemed to improve the first round (manually loaded) accuracy. I just kept the polymer one as a backup.

Personally, I still prefer a part like that made of steel over plastic, but I don't have any real proof that it is "better".
 

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If you are spending the money just for added weight, the relatively miniscule weight is not going to make any noticeable difference in recoil at all. Physics says it has to make a difference, but in actuality it is so slight, it is not noticed.

A couple months ago, I won a steak dinner bet with 2 hard core IDPA/USPSA shooters because they could not tell if I had put polymer or steel guide rods in their guns. And they were looking hard for any difference in feel and recoil.

The problem with changing the recoil spring weight, is that you affect cycle timing. That is the reason that most people that reload experiment with different spring weights when they load with higher or lower charges than usual of the ammo makers.

You might be able to get away with a couple pounds heavier without it affecting the timing enough to cause jams (unless of course you start shooting heavier loads)

Something cheaper that you might try to help with recoil that does not affect performance is Pachmayr slip on grip for the SR40C.

I have baseball mitt size hands and there was no way I could hold mine without an extra something to grab hold to, and in addition to making it comfortable in my hand, the slip on grip also absorbed a lot of the kick of the compact. Enough to make a very noticeable difference.

And they are only about $13 on ebay for the model #05177 grip.

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Doc,

I appreciate the insight. I happened to reach out to the horses mouth myself to see what the verdict was...(noting the have to sell products to stay in business!) Ill look into the grip.

*Response to my email in quotes asking about the product*

"No disadvantage to the 20lb at all, that's the weight we recommend for the .40S&W. It will definitely help with muzzle rise and felt recoil.

---
Brandyn Langston

Lead Gunsmith"
 

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That makes sense as the factory weight is 18#.

So it makes sense that 2 pounds should be fine.

Just to clarify, when I said no difference felt, I was talking about the plastic vs stainless issue you brought up.

I would be interested in your results of going to the 20# spring.

So it might be helpful to others too if in a follow up post, you report any differences that you notice

Doc
 

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I bought a stainless guide rod for my SR9c from Galloway...and honestly there was no perceivable (to me at least) difference between it and the plastic manufacturer part. I really only got it because I thought it looked better :)

There is no real pressure on the plastic itself, it is just there to hold the spring so you don't have to fight to get the spring back in the slide. That is my impression at least.

I did get the same spring weight though. But I would think that a stiffer spring would help with recoil a bit too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Doc,

This is what I was getting off of the product sight for the guide rod....

My reading said the compacts both have a 16lbs....?

Thanks!

SR questions:

-Guide rod spring rates?
The compacts both come stock with 16lb, we recommend the 14lb only for light handloads only, 18lb is the high in for 9mm and 20lb for the 40.
The full size pistols both now ship with 18lb, we recommend the 20lb for the 9mm and 22lb for the 40 models, the 15lb spring is for light hand loads only
 

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Well here is something interesting.

I just got off the phone with Ruger and spoke to a supervising technician.

He said because the 2 compacts use a dual spring assembly that there is no one tension weight measure for the recoil springs.

They just plain do not have that specification at all.

Makes me wonder

A) the source of the weight measures that I got for it several years ago when I got the gun

and

B) If the gun manufacturer themself say that there is no measure for it, how Gallaway came up with it.

It is things like this that will bug me until I solve it.. which is silly because it is such an insignificant thing.

Either it will work or it won't and Galloway will refund/replace at their cost if something they say will work does not.

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Doc,

You are the MAN! Thanks for going the extra step on that one. I, like you, probably get too technical on things that do not warrant such detail. But that is an interest fact....

I am leaning toward picking it up for a "why the heck not" factor. Doesn't seem to do any adverse damage per se to the gun, and there MIGHT be a modest benefit.

Ill report back if I go with the upped spring weight.

Also, taking your advice and shopping for some grip sleeves. Around $11...not too bad!
 
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