Ruger Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
SR9 chamber issues. (peening)

ok, i have around 1000 rounds through her, she is starting to show some pretty bad wear to me. im not sure exactly the right word to call it though. on the barrel, the front of the chamber on the outside to be exact, were the chamber block hits the inside of the slide when the pistol is fired, there is some "smashing" of the outside of the chamber.



 

·
/Brownster/Blk Dynamite
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
That's what mine looks like. I've got about 2000 rds through mine.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,779 Posts
Seems most SR9s get that "peening" effect on that area.See what other SR9ers around here have to say.
 

·
/Brownster/Blk Dynamite
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
If it helps I haven't had any issue with firing and I'm sure mine looked like that 1000 rds ago
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
just wanted to make sure it was not a defect, Ruger has great customer service but i wanted to get yalls opinions before i called them up. There is not any noticeable change when i fire it. Ive got a buddy that can clean it up and get the "peening" smoothed down. Yall think like thats the way to go rather than calling Ruger and seeing what they say?

and im sorry if this is a double post, but i couldnt find anything on it without knowing the proper term.

Thanks guys!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,779 Posts
just wanted to make sure it was not a defect, Ruger has great customer service but i wanted to get yalls opinions before i called them up. There is not any noticeable change when i fire it. Ive got a buddy that can clean it up and get the "peening" smoothed down. Yall think like thats the way to go rather than calling Ruger and seeing what they say?

and im sorry if this is a double post, but i couldnt find anything on it without knowing the proper term.

Thanks guys!
Hey Parkis i think its normal but wait and see if anyone else chimes in with there experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
ok, i have around 1000 rounds through her, she is starting to show some pretty bad wear to me. im not sure exactly the right word to call it though. on the barrel, the front of the chamber on the outside to be exact, were the chamber block hits the inside of the slide when the pistol is fired, there is some "smashing" of the outside of the chamber.
That is pretty minor, and if it bothers you, gently remove it with a small/fine file. All you need to do is break the sharp edge away from the slide (away from the muzzle end of the barrel), don't push material towards the slide.

After many, many thousands of rounds, this is barrel peening that concerned me more. http://rugerforum.net/ruger-pistols/46885-different-kind-barrel-peening.html Taken care of by the always great Ruger CS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
To me the outside of your chamber looks a little bit rough but probably nothing to major.

Here is mine with around 1100 rounds through it. (sorry for the bad cellphone pix)



I have heard of SR9's having peening problems but mine looks close to new. I am very adamant about cleaning it and I am also a habitual over luber don't know if that has anything to do with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
I have a little over 1000 rounds on my SR9. At my last cleaning after range, started to notice slight peening. I used a diamond file and gently smoothed out rough surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Guys, please don't take this the wrong way, but you all seem so accepting of this peening issues.

I had a barrel peening issue on a Colt 1991 that came after merely 150 rounds. I consulted with the experts in the 1911 forum and everybody there said that peening on the barrel is a SERIOUS ISSUE that has to be taken up with the manufacturer.

The reasons given to me were so myriad my head spun. Mistiming, wrong barrel heating treatment, wrong heat treating of the slides metal, etc. etc. etc. were some of the causes that I can remember as reasons given.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,736 Posts
I have more than 2000 rounds thru my SR9c. After a few hundred rounds I took a file to my barrel in the area where a small amount of peening was happening. It hasn't come back.

I would carefully remove it and watch to see if it comes back. Removing the peening gets rid of a sharp surface that can do damage.

The barrel in an SR series is doing a lot of moving as a round is being fired.

There wil be some wear as metal to metal contact is made. There will be some break in wear, it's a mass produced firearm, not a hand built/fitted device.


==============
Added info.

I've run less than 20 +p rounds (Gold Dots, as I recall I keep very accurate records, I could look it up) thru my SR9c so the post later in this thread that claims all peening is do to firing to many "hot" loads doesn't hold true in my case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Peening is a Red Line Thingy

Here comes a response that's sure to get someone's Irish up, but it must be said.

The SR series of Rugers, like all Rugers are, first, last, and always, made of the toughest metal in the industry, and will not only meet, but typically exceed SAAMI and military standards. With but a few exceptions they note, all their guns are made to shoot any ammo. Nobody is more astute than Ruger when it comes to metallurgy, and it's likely that nobody makes more gun parts for competitive guns under contract than Ruger's Pine Tree Castings division. If the manual states that you may fire whatever industry standard ammo is made in the world for that gun, you may safely feel free to carry on to your hearts content and shoot such as might come your way in the way of industry approved factory or mil spec ammo. But now comes Exhibit A, with photos, and testimony from Ruger owners of peening. Ah, yes, peening. "Where did that come from!"

Now I'll deliver the bomb: Having said all that, any military or police armorer is aware that he is an armorer for one very silly reason... Guns can take just so much abuse before they show their age. :rolleyes: Back shortly before I became an armorer in the early 70s, cops fired a box of 158 grain Lubaloy maybe (emphasis on the maybe) once a year. It was only after I began training officers with higher pressure ammo that wheels started to come off the tomato cart, and a need was shown to have a logistical support for repair. After consulting with S&W, who was besieged with the same issue from all compass points, I was sent for two weeks at Springfield (and Ruger, Remington, etc.,) to learn how to fix problems the Chiefs had never budgeted for in previous decades. A simple factoid reared up. Shooting lots of ammo is to a gun what driving lots of miles is to a car. One car can go 300,000 miles and be far better off than the same model next door that has less than 60,000. It's not the use; it's the ABuse.

But that does not imply that such guns are weak or lacking in any way. It matters not how many rounds are fired, provided pressures are reasonable. I'll say that again. It matters not how many rounds are fired in a pistol, provided pressures are reasonable. It is typically the case that the amplitude dial is turned up just a bit further than is necessary for the task. If you have a department or military armorer at your beck and call, it's one thing. If you're shooting your own hardware, sans a support liaison, a different approach is perhaps a very worthy consideration. After all, if you're not a tax funded arm of government in a fashionable uniform, you've got to save your money to give it to the tax funded arm of government so he can have it for his fashionable uniform. :D

The classic example is the Model 29 S&W .44 Magnum. Smith introduced the gun having no clue that Clint Eastwood would hit the silver screen with Dirty Harry advertising the "most powerful handgun in the world, punk". Before the sequel came out, Model 29's were being stuffed with a steady diet of Remington 240 grain jacketed factory loads and shot with copious quantities of such fodder, and Smith & Wesson suddenly had to answer thousands of complaints about how their guns were suffering chronic cylinder endshake, bent center pins, closed cylinder gaps, and rattling grips. Their guns didn't blow up, but were corresponding to the kick in the ribs they were being subjected to, and were hollering; "someone please have mercy!" Mercy was not given, and countless of those fine guns ended up as loose as old pail handles. Someone at Sales and R&D at S&W figured wrongly that the guns would be treated to .44 Specials for target shooting, and the full-house loads kept for an occasional shot at deer. All they had done, after all, was to lengthen the old .44 Special chamber and give extra attention to metallurgy to satisfy a few die hard Elmer Keith fans, but had no clue that guys would use them to show off their studliness to swooning gals giggling behind the barn and at the local clubs. I don't imagine too many gals fell over fainting, but there surely was a stampede of hysterical Model 29 owners who were suddenly writing impassioned letters to Skeeter Skelton, looking for answers to why their wheelgun wasn't winning Oscars. There was nothing wrong with the gun, per se. It just wasn't made for a market that thought that every shot had to be "the most powerful handgun in the world, punk". It was made to be the most powerful, but not to be fed such a steady diet as was unmercifully cycled through them.

Just because a gun can be fed NATO or +P+ specification ammunition, certainly doesn't imply that it won't get older sooner. Failure to invoke this simple fact won't delay the aging process.

On the same score, used gun racks are full of extremely loose over-under shotguns that were fed steady diets of high velocity sporting clays loads over a period of just four or five years. The rules permitted it, and the guns were made to shoot it, so their owners enthusiastically pumped the handles of their MECs with top-end Lyman loads, and thought their guns would last forever. Your car passes extreme acceleration and braking tests, but you wouldn't launch your car like a missile and stop it with 75 feet of rubber every time and expect it to last any longer than a race car lasts on the Indy 500.

What am I saying? Simply, upon examining the photos, my educated assessment is that something on the order of high octane fuel has been at work, often, and repeatedly. You can do this, and it can be fixed, but the simpler solution is to refer to a rule that is called in legal terms, the "prudent man" approach. It's not how many rounds that a gun has fired; it's what kind of rounds. I'm a former professional Police Instructor, and remain an avid competitive and recreational shooter. Nobody puts more lead downrange than people like me. But, my guns are as mechanically perfect as the day they were new. And no gun that I shoot is shot more frequently than my 9mm SR9c. Same with my buddy. Thousands of shots, and as they say in Brooklyn... poifect. Not a wrinkle. Metallurgy is not a variable at Ruger. They use the same recipes from one gun to another. My gun is the same metal as your gun, as the next, and so forth. Neither is mass production an issue. Guns are either headspaced, or they're not. No gun gets two inches further down the line that doesn't pass headspace tests according to relevant ammunition specs.

Don't get me wrong. I don't load powder puff loads by any stretch of the imagination. But the difference between lashing out at your gun or kissing it can be measured in half to one grain of powder, or saving the Power Pistol and Accurate #7 for hunting expeditions, and bulking up powder in the target shooting spectrum.

As to NATO ammo that is so popular, you have to remember one subtle fact. It's made for expendable guns, and is quite destructive if used over an extended period of time. Ever notice how ejected brass goes into sub-orbit and comes down with mashed mouths and barely readable head stamps? There's some serious pressure being expended, quite apart from your civilian variety., and it's not the most efficient use of power, because it's not generally getting more than another 75 to 100 fps above SAAMI loads. That's the nature of internal pressure at the top end. Large increases in pressure yield very modest increases in velocity. But, that's not an issue with military folks. They want that 75 fps, and that's that. If it were only another 25 fps, they'd take it, because their priorities are not ours.

The General Staff at NATO are not in the least interested in "longevity" of anything they issue. When a gun (fighter jet, bomber, tank, aircraft carrier, soldier, sailor) is put in service, it is called upon to be used as an expendable item. Everything they issue is backed by the full value of your tax Dollar and a logistical command to keep things running and replaced when it's burned out. I imagine a comical conversation between a gun manufacturer and some Ordnance General officer that goes like this...

(General) "Hey good buddy, what sort of pressure can that there ACME pistol of yers handle if we were to buy some? Uh-huh, you say about 96,000 c.u.p. in the test cabinet before it goes pop? Uh-huh."

(ACME) "Yes, Sir, but they will lock up and start failing long before that."

(General) "Well, I don't want any to lock up, but give me 500,000 at the start failing pressure level. I've got good Armorers in the field and we'll keep your contract going for spare parts! Yee hah! We'll be nailing them insurgents for sure!"

My first advice is to go to Staples and get an EASY button. Lay off the bargain NATO ammo in the O.D. can. And, whatever you do, don't alter springs; especially recoil springs, unless you know exactly what you are doing. An over-driven recoil spring can absolutely wreck a gun. Whatever springs are placed into a gun by Ruger is precisely the correct spring. If you find yourself needing a stiffer one, a thought should jump into your head... "This ammo is stiffer than the factory designed it for." Act accordingly. Nothing has cracked and destroyed more 1911s than the slamming that results from being kicked around by a high intensity recoil spring. The factory 16 pounder wasn't arrived at by some dream JMB had, but so often, people stick springs in guns because they heard that they should if their ejecting brass is landing in the parking lot.

No no no, NO. The landing in the parking lot thingy is related to the peening thingy. And the eardrum thingy.

That same spring culture has spread to SR9s and other guns, too. Lots of aftermarket springs out there that have been ruining lots of guns.

Whenever I see numbers like a 1,000 or even 5,000 rounds associated with a gun that's worn, I immediately know one thing. The ammo is hot, or some issue related to slide timing is way off. The reason is compelling. First of all, one round or a million is no reason for wearing a gun out or peening anything. A quality gun cannot wear out from shooting. But excessive pressures or poor slide cycling from bad ammo or springs can and most certainly will put some hurt on it, just as sure as hitting it with a hammer over and over. As Sarah Palin might say, It's a red line thingy. Nobody reading this would even consider running his truck 100 miles with the tach straddling the red line, but many wouldn't even blink at asking their favorite gun to do just that.

I am quite certain that as soon as I hit the Submit Reply button, I'll hear rebuttals from those who absolutely shoot nothing but ammo that wouldn't go through an old set of underwear. All anecdotal claims to the contrary, 'tis not the sub-underwear-penetrating loads that wreak havoc on anyone's guns. My SR9c has far more ammo through it than any claims I've seen on this blog, and there's not a hint of any more wear than some scuffing of the matte finish on the barrel chamber. And every one of the shots has been top drawer 9mm, and although I've fired at least 1,000 headstamped NATO in it, I intentionally keep the throttle back for most of my shooting, below NATO or +P+.

And then, there's a vast unknown when it comes to home brewed ammo, and most guns that suffer peening can trace their lineage back to ammo that has no pedigree of any kind, and be well beyond any published data, for nothing more than a change of brass or primers. Most of my ammo is home brewed, but I keep the lid on and never expect my guns to stand up to a constant admix of red-lined recipes.

As to the correct approach to fixing the gun, you should never take a file to metal that supports the breech. There's a cardinal rule that I learned way back in 1974 at Smith & Wesson: Once filed away, it's gone. Astutely learned Armorers peen metal back where it came from, before whipping out their trusty pillar file, and then they file with deft and cautioned strokes, calling on angels to guide them. Having said that; you're not trained to do such work, and whatever you do is subject to a very nebulous adventure where you may find yourself suddenly in The Twilight Zone. Moreover, the Customer Service people at Ruger will do whatever it takes to restore the gun to newness of life, and it'll be done correctly. If there's an issue with regard to defective product, you'll be doing your fellow shooters a very gracious service to let Ruger set their knowledgeable consultants at work to study the problem so that all might benefit. If you spread newspapers on your kitchen table and do it yourself, you've helped nobody except yourself... provided that you can.

In short, I would recommend absolutely no solution outside of Ruger's CS. I know it may sound like heresy to many, but repairing guns is not the same as repairing a rocking chair. Guns are made from blueprints that specify measurements expressed in thousandths, and you don't have access to such privy information. If a hundred people on this site have "successfully repaired" their SRs by filing or ignoring an obvious sign of stress, that's 100 too many. Until Ruger CS goes out of service for good, there's absolutely no reason to discuss alternative measures.

But, there is reason to get an EASY button and back off on the obvious signs of stress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Here are pictures of the peening I noticed after reading about the issue on this form. These were taken after a couple hundred rounds and I now have over 3000 rounds through it and it hasn't gotten worse. I have NEVER put any rounds through it other than the cheap Winchester and Remington target ammo from Wally World.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thanks GunBlue. ill give ruger a hollar tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I bought my SR9 right after they came out. The barrel peened so bad that it would hang up inside the slide. This was after only a couple of hundred rounds. I sent it back to Ruger for repair. It was sent back to me with a new barrel. I fired hundreds and hundreds of rounds with no more peening. It appeared to me that my original barrel was not hardened. There were a lot of similar complaints on the earlier SR9's when the were first introduced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
I had the same "peening" issue with my SR9 (no hang-ups though). I called Ruger, they emailed me a shipping label, I never sent it in. I had researched it a little and decided to file it off, and if it was to peen again I would send it in. I haven't had any issues since. I'm sure they would have sent me a new barrel, as they would you should you send it in. I filed it off then polished the exposed barrel to a mirrior finish with a dremel and polishing compound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
I have the same peening on my sr9. around 3000 rds of reloads thourgh it some were on the hot side. the peening is not very bad seeing the amount of rds fired. I will not file any metal from that area. but I will keep an eye on it. if it gets worse I will give ruger cs a call.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top